Jeremy Irons at the World Actors Forum

Jeremy Irons was in Dublin, Ireland at the Gate Theatre on Saturday 15 June 2013, to participate in the World Actors Forum. Trashed was screened at the WAF and, afterward, Jeremy was interviewed by Joseph O’Connor.

On the same day, Jeremy Irons was present at University College Dublin, to see Sinead Cusack receive an Honorary Doctorate Degree.

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The World Actors Forum 2013 from ALONG CAME A SPIDER on Vimeo.

Photo via @IrishFilmmakers on Twitter

Photo via @IrishFilmmakers on Twitter

Photo via Conor Furlong on Instagram

Photo via Conor Furlong on Instagram

Photo via @SticksStonesIRL on Twitter

Photo via @SticksStonesIRL on Twitter

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Jeremy Irons Attends Taormina Film Festival

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ROME — Italy’s Taormina Film Festival featured a mix of international blockbusters, smaller dramas and comedies in its famous Teatro Antico venue, with a list of Hollywood A-Listers on tap, as the 59-year-old festival continues its return to good health after a “near-death” experience last year.

taormina venue

The festival ran from June 15-22 in Taormina, Italy.

Trashed was screened on Wednesday, June 19 at 10:00 in the Convention Center – Hall A. Jeremy Irons was part of a Tao Class held on Wednesday, June 19 at 11.45 at the Hall A of the Convention Center.

Jeremy Irons was a recipient of the Taormina Arte Award. Here’s what the festival’s website has to say about Jeremy and the award (translated from Italian):

“Taormina Arte Award – Jeremy Irons
It ‘an interpreter of natural elegance, often also enjoys coloring and embellishing the prestigious cinematic tradition of British actors who wear the clothes of the “bad” with a pronounced English accent (even in a western like Appaloosa) or return to the origins of its training at the Old Vic appearing in reductions to Shakespeare as The Merchant of Venice. And ‘the most respected performers in English, starring theatrical films (like Callas Forever, Australia, The House of the Spirits), but also original and insightful studies of the author (Cronenberg’s Dead Ringers, Bertolucci’s Stealing Beauty, The French Lieutenant’s Woman of Reisz), but it will be in Taormina not only to speak of himself, of his excellent filmography, his acting style that blends technical and introspective fragility, authority and underground emotional outbursts, but mostly as a writer, producer and observer Trashed of Candida Brady, a film that takes in hand the risks to the food chain and the environment caused by pollution of air, land and sea. Looking at most of the planet, from Iceland to Indonesia, we discover surprising truth about imminent threats that surround us and our health, like the microplastic: plastic remnants infinitely small that fill the seas and, consequently, the fish, including those that end up on our tables. In Trashed, the actor takes us on a fascinating and disturbing to discover the devastating impact of human waste, more and more toxic than in the past. Also for his commitment, as well as the extraordinary career, the Festival pays homage to him with the Taormina Arte Award. ”

Jeremy Irons in Italy – June 2013

Jeremy Irons attended a press conference in Firenze (Florence), Italy, ahead of the Festival of Writers, where he read from Machiavelli’s The Prince and some works of Vladimir Nabokov, including Lolita.

He also introduced a screening of Trashed in Florence, Italy at the Odeon Cinema and participated in a panel discussion of the issues discussed in the film.

Fantastic album of photos by Francesca Battilani of Jeremy at the Trashed screening.

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Jeremy Irons at the 2013 Hay Festival

Jeremy Irons read Four Quartets by TS Eliot on Saturday 1 June.  He introduced a screening of Trashed and also was a part of the Poetry of the Great War readings on Sunday 2 June.

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Click HERE for audio of Jeremy Irons, Sinead Cusack and Rupert Evans reading The Poetry of the Great War. The actors read Josephine Hart’s programme featuring the work of Owen, Yeats, Sassoon and many others. Introduced by Francine Stock.
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Jeremy Irons on his love for TS Eliot – from The Telegraph

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Here are some photos and feedback from the weekend (Click on the thumbnails for larger images):

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Jeremy Irons at New York Times Energy for Tomorrow Conference

Jeremy Irons was a featured speaker at the New York Times Energy for Tomorrow Conference in New York City on Thursday, April 25, 2013.  He was interviewed by New York Times columnist Andrew Revkin about the film Trashed.

The New York Times Energy for Tomorrow conference featured Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s Food Waste Challenge announcement, where the Mayor talked for the first time about the City program with more than 100 restaurants to reduce organic waste sent to landfills; and a talk with Academy Award-winner Jeremy Irons on his documentary, “Trashed,” and the steps we can take in our daily lives to reduce waste.

You can watch the entire conference, broken up by panel, on demand at www.NYTEnergyforTomorrow.com.

Visit Andrew Revkin’s Dot Earth blog to see video of Jeremy at the conference and read more from Andrew Revkin.

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‘Trashed’ Screenings at Documentary Edge Festival NZ

Trashed will be screened as part of the Documentary Edge Festival in New Zealand.

documentary edge festival logo

Times and locations are as follows:

Sunday 14 April  6:45 pm at the Q Theatre in Auckland, New Zealand  BOOK TICKETS

Friday 19 April 1:15 pm at the Q Theatre in Auckland,New Zealand  BOOK TICKETS

Sunday 12 May 6:30 pm at the Reading Cinemas Courtenay in Wellington, New Zealand

Friday 17 May 1:45 pm at the Reading Cinemas Courtenay in Wellington, New Zealand

 

 

Jeremy Irons at the EU Commission

Brussels, Belgium. 7th March 2013 — British actor Jeremy Irons participated in a talk about plastic waste at the EU Commission. Jeremy was invited by EU Commissioner Januz Potonik to talk about plastic waste in the world. He added his voice to an EU campaign to ban non-recylable plastics, including plastic bags.

 

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From The New Age

British actor Jeremy Irons brought a rare touch of glamour to the European Union’s headquarters in Brussels on Thursday to talk about an issue close to his heart: Trash disposal.

“I refuse to call it waste. ‘Waste’ is a verb, it is what we do. We are wasting our resources,” he said.

His appearance at the European Commission, the bloc’s executive, was in support of a drive to find ways of reducing the mountains of plastic rubbish generated annually, much of which ends up in the world’s oceans.

“What I’ve tried to do is glamourize trash,” Irons said, conceding that it was not an issue that won many votes.

Irons dismissed the tendency to shelve recycling as a matter to be dealt with after resolving more pressing issues, such as the economic crisis.

He said it didn’t take much effort for people to separate their rubbish, adding, “It doesn’t cost me anything to put out my separate bins and I get rather a pleasure out of it.”

The actor said: “We can make money out of recycling,” adding that it also generated jobs.

He referred to the 12 million euros (15.6 million dollars) that Ireland had made by introducing a 15-cent charge on plastic bags, which he said had also reduced the use of new bags by 92 per cent.

Irons said that by contrast his country, Britain, was doing “spectacularly little” on recycling, failing for example to tax plastic bags – “a symbol of waste.”

He said disorganization and vested interests – specifically those of the companies earning money off rubbish disposal and incineration – stood in the way of progress towards better trash management.

Ultimately, however, Irons said it was up to individuals to bring about change – by refusing to buy plastic water bottles, reusing and repairing old goods or by composting, as he did.

“I’m just a bloke,” the actor said. “There are a lot of blokes and women around in the world,” adding that it was their behaviour that would help bring about change.

“Politicians will therefore, in their normal fashion, be able to follow the current mood,” he added.

Last year, Irons produced and featured in a documentary film, Trashed, highlighting the issue of rubbish disposal and the need for more recycling.

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Getting Trashed with Jeremy Irons – from the Wall Street Journal

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Jeremy Irons to Attend ‘Trashed’ Screening in Brussels, Belgium

Source

LOGO CE_Vertical_EN_quadri

The event:

What: 12.30 Joint press conference by European Commissioner for Environment, Janez Potočnik and Jeremy Irons, Narrator and Executive Producer the documentary film Trashed.

The launch will be followed by the projection of the film Trashed in the European Parliament.

When: Thursday 7th March 2013

Where: Berlaymont Press Room, in Brussels
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The news:

The European Commission is publishing a Green Paper on plastic waste to launch a structured discussion about how to make plastic products more sustainable throughout their life cycle and reduce the impact of plastic waste on the environment. The current EU environmental legislation doesn’t specifically address the particular challenges posed by plastic waste. The Green Paper aims to collect facts and stakeholders’ views on the impacts of plastic waste and a way of mitigating them through a European strategy. The consultation consists of 26 questions and will last until end of May 2013. The result will feed into further policy action in 2014 as part of a broader waste policy review, which will look in particular at the existing targets for waste recovery and landfill as well as an ex-post evaluation of five directives covering various waste streams.

The background:

Once in the environment, particularly in the marine environment, plastic waste can persist for hundreds of years. Up to 10 million tons of litter, mostly plastic, end up in the world’s oceans and seas annually, turning them into the world’s biggest plastic dump. The presence of plastic residues, even in the most remote areas of world seas and shores shows that there is a price to pay for unhampered proliferation of plastic waste. Conventional plastic also contains a large number, and sometimes a large proportion of chemical additives which can be carcinogenic, provoke other toxic reactions or act as endocrine disruptors.

‘Trashed’ Screening for Parliament

Trashed was screened for Members of Parliament at Portcullis House on Thursday 7 February 2013.

Trashed documentary highlights wastefulness – from resource.co.uk

Trashed documentary shown at House of Commons review from letsrecycle.com

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Photo via @FreegleBrighton on Twitter

Photo via Trashed Film on facebook

Photo via Trashed Film on facebook

Photo via Trashed Film on facebook

Photo via Trashed Film on facebook

Photo via Candida Brady on Twitter

Photo via Candida Brady on Twitter

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‘Trashed’ DVD Release Date

Trashed will be released on DVD (Region 2) on April 22, 2013.

Pre-order your copy from Amazon.co.uk

trashed film logo 2

Product details:

Actors: Jeremy Irons
Directors: Candida Brady
Format: PAL, Widescreen
Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe)
Number of discs: 1
Studio: Blenheim Films
DVD Release Date: 22 April 2013
Run Time: 97 minutes

Review
TRASHED– 5 stars – New York Daily News – Jeremy Irons takes us through a tour of the world s grotesque garbage consumption and failure to dispose of its trash, which inspires horrified reactions from both him and us. This is appalling , our Oscar-winning guide says, sitting on a debris-strewn beach in Lebanon. Seem bleak? It s supposed to, as director Candida Brady uses a thriller-ish tone to show the state of the planet. And if facts about 150 years of plastics, dioxins and dangerous castoffs don t jolt you, a visit to a hospital for malformed children will. Yet for all the poisonous truths in Trashed, there are also solid grass-roots solutions that, as presented, feel do-able and politically digestible. That helps, because everything Irons finds puts you off food. Crucial viewing for realists and alarmists both. —http://www.laweekly.com/movies/trashed-1494726/

This is appalling, says the actor Jeremy Irons, surveying a reeking mountain of consumer waste fouling a once glorious beach in Lebanon. That spoiled shoreline is only one of many revolting sights in Trashed, Candida Brady s down-and-dirty documentary about our inability to neutralize safely much of what we throw away. Taking us on a global tour of escalating rubbish and toxic disposal options, Ms. Brady rubs our faces in the poisonous consequences of littering the planet with substances that, like bedbugs and French mimes, are almost impossible to get rid of. But if we must talk trash, Mr. Irons assisted by a scientist or two and Vangelis’s doomy score is an inspired choice of guide. Soothing and sensitive, his liquid gaze alighting on oozing landfills and belching incinerators, he moves through the film with a tragic dignity that belies his whimsical neckwear and jaunty hats. Every sterile whale and plastic-choked turtle is a dagger in his heart (and will be in yours too), to say nothing of the farmers ruined by chemically contaminated livestock. By the time Mr. Irons visits a Vietnamese hospital for children with severe birth defects the legacy of Agent Orange that plastic water bottle in your hand will feel as dangerous as a Molotov cocktail. –www.nytimes.com

The world is in a heap of trouble — make that heaps: giant, toxic mountains of garbage that endanger our oceans, marine life, the atmosphere and humanity in general — without an end in sight. That is, unless citizens, industry and governments get deadly serious about such solutions as mass recycling, composting, plastics reduction and more. Such is the global crisis that’s vividly, relentlessly detailed in the vital documentary starring dulcet-voiced zero waste advocate, actor Jeremy Irons. Guided by writer-director Candida Brady, Irons (genial, studious) travels the globe visiting some of the most egregious, noxious examples of trash disposal and waste mismanagement; vast, open-air garbage dumps in Lebanon and Indonesia that infect its waterways and coastlines are particularly horrendous. It’s not a pretty picture, to say the least, with a stop in Vietnam to examine birth defects linked to wartime Agent Orange spraying proving a deeply grim offshoot of the film’s central thrust. Then there’s the garbage calamity’s most insidious culprit: non-recycled, non-biodegradable plastic. The movie, as have other eco-documentaries, chillingly examines how endless bits of the toxic material routinely flood our oceans, harm its inhabitants and find their way into the fish we eat. Scientists, doctors and academics weigh in as well, though flipside input from corporate interests and government policymakers would have added welcome dimension to this crucial discussion. —www.latimes.com/entertainment/movies/moviesnow/la-et-mn-trashed-capsule-20121214,0,7515915.story