Behind the Scenes of ‘The Correspondence’

Video from

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Video screencaps…




Jeremy Irons Reads ‘Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats’

Airing on Christmas Day 2015, Jeremy Irons read from TS Eliot’s Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats, on BBC Radio 4.

Click below to listen to Part 1:

Click below to listen to Part 2:

Screen Shot 2015-12-14 at 12.31.25 PM

Text from the BBC:

On Christmas Day 1937 , nearly two years before book publication, five of T.S Eliot’s Practical Cats poems were broadcast as readings by Geoffrey Tandy on BBC Radio . The Radio Times wrote’ For some time past Mr Eliot has been amusing and instructing the offspring of some of his friends in verse on the subject of cats. These poems are not the kind that have been usually associated with his name’.

Over 75 years later, one of our greatest actors, Oscar- winning Jeremy Irons re-visits the original five poems along with the further ten which make up the Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats .

In this treat for Christmas day you will find familiar much-loved characters including Growltiger, Mungojerrie , Rumpleteaser, Old Deutoronomy, Mr Mistoffelees, Macavity Gus and Skimbleshanks . These are cats who are notorious , lurk in shadows, baffle Scotland yard, dance by the light of the moon and who must not be woken . They are found on trains, in the theatre, in the high street. They juggle, sleep, conjure, are curious and bore but they all show another side of one of our most important British poets .

T.S Eliot ‘s poems have been enjoyed by many in the musical Cats, but here we return to the poems without any music and celebrate the inventiveness in the original words. Following on from his powerful readings of The Waste land , Four Quartets and The Love song of J. Alfred Prufrock for BBC Radio 4 Jeremy Irons continues his radio journey through the works of T.S Eliot with the cats .

The Naming of Cats
Skimbleshanks The Railway Cat
Growltiger’s Last Stand
The Rum Tum Tugger
The Song of the Jellicles
Mungojerrie and Rumpelteazer
Old Deuteronomy
Of the Awefull Battle of the Pekes and the Pollicles
Mr Mistoffelees
Macavity:The Mystery Cat

Gus:The Theatre Cat
The Old Gumbie Cat
Bustopher Jones:The Cat about Town
Cat Morgan introduces himself
The Ad-dressing of Cats.

Directed in Salford by Susan Roberts.

Assassin’s Creed Abstergo Website Launch

Scroll down for an audio clip from Jeremy Irons as Alan Rikkin.


20th Century Fox has revealed the first banner for the upcoming Assassin’s Creed movie, which is set to hit theaters on 21 December 2016.


In addition, the viral marketing for the film has kicked off with the launch of the Abstergo website.  Follow on Twitter @AssassinsMovie

The film’s official social accounts also revealed an image of Abstergo CEO Alan Rikkin’s business card featuring a number that fans can call which seemingly reveals when to expect the trailer for the film.
If you call the number(s) on the business card, you hear the following message:
Assassin’s Creed stars Michael Fassbender, Marion Cotillard, Jeremy Irons and Brendan Gleeson. The film is directed by Justin Kurzel.

Jeremy Irons at Associated Studios Christmas Concert

Jeremy Irons was a part of the Associated Studios Christmas Concert on Thursday 10 December 2015, at the Actors Church, Covent Garden, London.

Jeremy read “Letter 1” from Letters to a Young Poet by Rainer Maria Rilke.

Listen to audio of Jeremy’s reading (headphones recommended) and read along with the text below this audio player:

February 17, 1903

Dear Sir,

Your letter arrived just a few days ago. I want to thank you for the great confidence you have placed in me. That is all I can do. I cannot discuss your verses; for any attempt at criticism would be foreign to me. Nothing touches a work of art so little as words of criticism: they always result in more or less fortunate misunderstandings. Things aren’t all so tangible and sayable as people would usually have us believe; most experiences are unsayable, they happen in a space that no word has ever entered, and more unsay able than all other things are works of art, those mysterious existences, whose life endures beside our own small, transitory life.

With this note as a preface, may I just tell you that your verses have no style of their own, although they do have silent and hidden beginnings of something personal. I feel this most clearly in the last poem, “My Soul.” There, some thing of your own is trying to become word and melody. And in the lovely poem “To Leopardi” a kind of kinship with that great, solitary figure does perhaps appear. Nevertheless, the poems are not yet anything in themselves, not yet any thing independent, even the last one and the one to Leopardi. Your kind letter, which accompanied them managed to make clear to me various faults that I felt in reading your verses, though I am not able to name them specifically.

You ask whether your verses are any good. You ask me. You have asked others before this. You send them to magazines. You compare them with other poems, and you are upset when certain editors reject your work. Now (since you have said you want my advice) I beg you to stop doing that sort of thing. You are looking outside, and that is what you should most avoid right now. No one can advise or help you – no one. There is only one thing you should do. Go into yourself. Find out the reason that commands you to write; see whether it has spread its roots into the very depths of your heart; confess to yourself whether you would have to die if you were forbidden to write. This most of all: ask yourself in the most silent hour of your night: must I write? Dig into yourself for a deep answer. And if this answer rings out in assent, if you meet this solemn question with a strong, simple “I must”, then build your life in accordance with this necessity; your whole life, even into its humblest and most indifferent hour, must become a sign and witness to this impulse. Then come close to Nature. Then, as if no one had ever tried before, try to say what you see and feel and love and lose. Don’t write love poems; avoid those forms that are too facile and ordinary: they are the hardest to work with, and it takes a great, fully ripened power to create something individual where good, even glorious, traditions exist in abundance. So rescue yourself from these general themes and write about what your everyday life offers you; describe your sorrows and desires, the thoughts that pass through your mind and your belief in some kind of beauty Describe all these with heartfelt, silent, humble sincerity and, when you express yourself, use the Things around you, the images from your dreams, and the objects that you remember. If your everyday life seems poor, don’t blame it; blame yourself; admit to yourself that you are not enough of a poet to call forth its riches; because for the creator there is no poverty and no poor, indifferent place. And even if you found yourself in some prison, whose walls let in none of the world’s sound – wouldn’t you still have your childhood, that jewel beyond all price, that treasure house of memories? Turn your attention to it. Try to raise up the sunken feelings of this enormous past; your personality will grow stronger, your solitude will expand and become a place where you can live in the twilight, where the noise of other people passes by, far in the distance. And if out of , this turning within, out of this immersion in your own world, poems come, then you will not think of asking anyone whether they are good or not. Nor will you try to interest magazines in these works: for you will see them as your dear natural possession, a piece of your life, a voice from it. A work of art is good if it has arisen out of necessity. That is the only way one can judge it. So, dear Sir, I can’t give you any advice but this: to go into yourself and see how deep the place is from which your life flows; at its source you will find the answer to, the question of whether you must create. Accept that answer, just as it is given to you, without trying to interpret it. Perhaps you will discover that you are called to be an artist. Then take that destiny upon yourself, and bear it, its burden and its greatness, without ever asking what reward might come from outside. For the creator must be a world for himself and must find everything in himself and in Nature, to whom his whole life is devoted.

But after this descent into yourself and into your solitude, perhaps you will have to renounce becoming a poet (if, as I have said, one feels one could live without writing, then one shouldn’t write at all). Nevertheless, even then, this self searching that I ask of you will not have been for nothing. Your life will still find its own paths from there, and that they may be good, rich, and wide is what I wish for you, more than I can say.

What else can I tell you? It seems to me that everything has its proper emphasis; and finally I want to add just one more bit of advice: to keep growing, silently and earnestly, through your whole development; you couldn’t disturb it any more violently than by looking outside and waiting for outside answers to questions that only your innermost feeling, in your quietest hour, can perhaps answer.

It was a pleasure for me to find in your letter the name of Professor Horacek; I have great reverence for that kind, learned man, and a gratitude that has lasted through the years. Will you please tell him how I feel; it is very good of him to still think of me, and I appreciate it.

The poem that you entrusted me with, I am sending back to you. And I thank you once more for your questions and sincere trust, of which, by answering as honestly as I can, I have tried to make myself a little worthier than I, as a stranger, really am.

Yours very truly,

Rainer Maria Rilke


Jeremy Irons Attends ICAP Charity Day 2015

Jeremy Irons participated in ICAP Charity Day 2015.  Jeremy raised funds for

From the ICAP Charity Day Facebook Page: Since its creation, ICAP has always given money to charity. In 1993, when the firm had grown to around 100 people in London, it was decided to do something on a larger and more innovative scale; something that would make a significant difference to charities. The idea of ICAP Charity Day was born; a day on which all revenues and commissions are given away to just a few charities, meaning each would receive a large amount of money which would really make a difference to their operations. This gave the firm and its customers a unique way of contributing to society, especially in view of its position in the financial world.  This method of giving is very different from the normal way that companies choose to give to charity by donating money out of their profits. At ICAP, the brokers themselves are giving away their own commissions to charity, as well as the company giving away its revenues.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

‘The Correspondence’ Trailer

Here’s the newly released trailer for The Correspondence, directed by Giuseppe Tornatore and starring Jeremy Irons and Olga Kurylenko.

Screencaps and stills gallery: