‘An Actor Prepares’ First Trailer and Screencaps

The first trailer for An Actor Prepares, starring Jeremy Irons and Jack Huston, has been released.

Jeremy Irons portrays a famous, hard-drinking actor who suffers a heart attack and is forced to drive across the country to make it in time for the wedding of his daughter, played by Mamie Gummer. His only hope of making the wedding lies with his estranged son, played by Jack Huston, is a devoted husband and professor who couldn’t be more different from his father. As the two set out on their adventure, they become closer and realize they are more alike than they thought.

“Jeremy Irons and Jack Huston make a hilarious father and son duo in this delightful comedy,” said Laura Florence, VP of sales and marketing for Gravitas Ventures.

Gravitas Ventures plans to release An Actor Prepares in theaters and on demand on Aug. 31.

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Click on the link below to view the trailer:

https://variety.com/2018/film/news/jeremy-irons-jack-huston-an-actor-prepares-1202852004/&jwsource=cl
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Click on the images in the gallery to view them full sized:
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Jeremy Irons – Masters of Tradition Festival 2018

Jeremy Irons is participating in this year’s Masters of Tradition Festival in Bantry, County Cork, Ireland. On Sunday 26 August at 15.30 at the Maritime Hotel will be Martin Hayes in conversation with Jeremy Irons. Tickets are on sale now for €30.

To book, go to bit.ly/2l5GHqc

Learn more about the entire 2018 Masters of Tradition Festival HERE.

Join us for this special event where we hear one of the world’s finest fiddlers and Artistic Director of Masters of Tradition, Martin Hayes, chat to the Oscar-winning actor Jeremy Irons.

The two will discuss various influences and topics such as music, performance, presence, and the similarities between music and acting. The event will be interspersed with musical demonstrations and references. ‘The great fiddler Martin Hayes speaks with the soul of a poet. A remarkable artiste, the only one of his type.’ Sunday Independent, Ireland

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Jeremy Irons – ‘Awakening in the West’ Clip

Jeremy Irons reflects on “just sitting” and giving the mind a rest so we can pass a better time in this life.

This is a preview clip from the documentary feature film (Awakening in the West) coming in 2018 – a StillnessSpeaks production (https://www.stillnessspeaks.com)

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Jeremy Irons at Irish Rep Gala 2018

Irish Repertory Theatre celebrated their annual gala with Alan Jay Lerner: A Centennial Celebration, this season’s Gala Benefit production, June 4 at The Town Hall.

The evening honored the contributions of Irish Rep board member Tina Santi Flaherty and featured performances by Jeremy Irons, Steven Bogardus, John Cullum, John Cudia, Melissa Errico, James Barbour and more.

Instagram Stories Video of Jeremy Singing at Rehearsal

 

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Jeremy Irons at BAM Gala 2018

On Wednesday 30th May 2018, BAM honoured Darren Aronofsky, Jeremy Irons, and Nora Ann Wallace & Jack Nusbaum for their commitment and generous contributions to the arts.

6:30PM – Cocktails & BAM Art Auction
7:30PM – Dinner & Program
Brooklyn Cruise Terminal / 72 Bowne Street / Red Hook

9PM – After Party & Auction Closing
Pioneer Works / 159 Pioneer Street / Red Hook

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Jeremy Irons – 7 Questions – TIME Magazine

From the June 4, 2018 issue of TIME Magazine (with Prince Harry and Meghan Markle on the cover)…

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Click on the image below to view it full-sized:

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The Love Song of Jeremy Irons – New York Times

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Click on the image below to view it full-sized:

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Audiobook Review:

Jeremy Irons Breathes New Life Into ‘The Poems of T.S. Eliot’

by Lyndall Gordon

THE POEMS OF T.S. ELIOT
By T.S. Eliot
Read by Jeremy Irons
3 Hours, 41 Minutes. Faber & Faber.

There is no definitive voice for reading T. S. Eliot. His own manner, with its proper enunciations, can’t be placed. He was always from somewhere else. In his native St. Louis, his family looked to ancestral New England; at Harvard, he came from a “border state.” As a newcomer to London, teaching schoolboys in Highgate, he was “the American master.” He discarded his American accent without ever coming to sound unquestionably English. I wish it were possible to consult Professor Higgins: Can there be a neutral delivery, devoid of geographical cadence? The recordings of Eliot’s poems try for transparency; lasting content takes precedence over any one reader at a single point in time.

Eliot is the master of the unsaid. Irons’s sensitivity to Prufrock’s hesitation on the brink of utterance allows the poetry to bring out a prophetic impulse without sounding entirely absurd: “Do I dare / Disturb the universe?”

Like other great readers of Eliot (among them John Gielgud and Alec Guinness), Irons combines the velvet with emotionally alert variations in pace. With the line “It is impossible to say just what I mean!,” he speeds up the frustration seething beneath Prufrock’s genteel front, complete with formal necktie. Irons makes a bold decision to let loose the speaker’s longing, to the point of a sigh, and he is wonderfully suggestive in the variations on “Shantih shantih shantih” echoing on at the end of “The Waste Land.” I used to wonder if “the peace which passeth understanding,” Eliot’s note to this word, was building or fading. The poet’s own deadpan reading did not provide an answer, but Irons comes down on uncertainty with three different intonations. His final, stretched-out “Shantih” injects a strange intimacy following a thunderous “DA,” announcing rain — water as a sign of the spiritual fertility that Eliot longed for all his life.

Irons voices an Eliot who craves, desires and suffers more openly than in the sober accents of Gielgud and Guinness. Their recordings, completed during the poet’s lifetime, perhaps felt the impress of Eliot’s neutrality. Yet for them, and for Irons too, the poet appears one of us, which is to say that in all these recordings Eliot becomes more English than I think he really was. Irons glides smoothly over a barrage of judgments in “Marina,” “Death” being embodied in “Those who sit in the sty of contentment” and in “Those who suffer the ecstasy of the animals.” Here is an annihilation of the flesh worthy of his Puritan forebear Andrew Eliott of Salem, a juror in the witchcraft trials.

Instead, Irons lends himself to what coexists with the voice of judgment: what is hesitant, what feels unattainable and the struggles of a flawed being in “Four Quartets.” A high point is when Eileen Atkins joins Irons in the best “Waste Land” reading ever in terms of interpretation and play of voices. Listen especially to the repartee of a man and a woman caged together in a hellish union. Their emotional duo and the naturalness that Irons brings to Eliot make this set of CDs a special gift.

 

Lyndall Gordon is the author of “The Imperfect Life of T.S. Eliot,” and, most recently, “Outsiders: Five Women Writers Who Changed the World.”