Jeremy Irons Attends Taormina Film Festival

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Scroll down for videos.

ROME — Italy’s Taormina Film Festival featured a mix of international blockbusters, smaller dramas and comedies in its famous Teatro Antico venue, with a list of Hollywood A-Listers on tap, as the 59-year-old festival continues its return to good health after a “near-death” experience last year.

taormina venue

The festival ran from June 15-22 in Taormina, Italy.

Trashed was screened on Wednesday, June 19 at 10:00 in the Convention Center – Hall A. Jeremy Irons was part of a Tao Class held on Wednesday, June 19 at 11.45 at the Hall A of the Convention Center.

Jeremy Irons was a recipient of the Taormina Arte Award. Here’s what the festival’s website has to say about Jeremy and the award (translated from Italian):

“Taormina Arte Award – Jeremy Irons
It ‘an interpreter of natural elegance, often also enjoys coloring and embellishing the prestigious cinematic tradition of British actors who wear the clothes of the “bad” with a pronounced English accent (even in a western like Appaloosa) or return to the origins of its training at the Old Vic appearing in reductions to Shakespeare as The Merchant of Venice. And ‘the most respected performers in English, starring theatrical films (like Callas Forever, Australia, The House of the Spirits), but also original and insightful studies of the author (Cronenberg’s Dead Ringers, Bertolucci’s Stealing Beauty, The French Lieutenant’s Woman of Reisz), but it will be in Taormina not only to speak of himself, of his excellent filmography, his acting style that blends technical and introspective fragility, authority and underground emotional outbursts, but mostly as a writer, producer and observer Trashed of Candida Brady, a film that takes in hand the risks to the food chain and the environment caused by pollution of air, land and sea. Looking at most of the planet, from Iceland to Indonesia, we discover surprising truth about imminent threats that surround us and our health, like the microplastic: plastic remnants infinitely small that fill the seas and, consequently, the fish, including those that end up on our tables. In Trashed, the actor takes us on a fascinating and disturbing to discover the devastating impact of human waste, more and more toxic than in the past. Also for his commitment, as well as the extraordinary career, the Festival pays homage to him with the Taormina Arte Award. ”

Jeremy Irons on ‘Dame Edna Live at the Palace’ from 2003

Jeremy Irons Interviewed by Scott Feinberg with Audio

From The Hollywood Reporter and Scott Feinberg’s Blog “The Race”

[Follow Scott Feinberg on Twitter @ScottFeinberg and @THR_TheRace]

  • jeremy_irons_interview_podcast.mp3
jeremy_irons_2011_H.jpg
 photo from Roadside Attractions

On Thursday morning, I had the privilege of speaking for about 30 minutes with the great London-based stage and screen actor Jeremy Irons, just minutes after his name was announced as a best actor (in a TV drama) Golden Globe nominee for his work on the critically-acclaimed Showtime series The Borgias.

Irons, 63, has already won just about every acting award that exists: an Oscar, a Golden Globe, a SAG Award, an Emmy, a Tony, an Annie, and prizes from all of the major critics groups, including the Los Angeles Film Critics Association, New York Film Critics Circle, and National Society of Film Critics. He mentions during our chat that he recently loaned his inimitable voice to a recorded reading of T.S. Eliot‘s The Waste Land, which could, hypothetically, earn him a Grammy, as well, which would make him just the 11th member of the elite EGOT club!

But, as Irons notes during our conversation, it is neither a desire for awards, nor a fondness for fame, nor even a particular passion for acting (he’s appeared in only 40 movies since his big screen debut 30 years ago) that keeps him in the game at this point in his life. Instead, it is a deep connection that he feels to certain characters that he reads, as well as a need for the creative companionship of other actors, that periodically draws him away from his various homes and hobbies and back into the fray.

The most memorable of his film roles include a lovestruck victorian in Karel Reisz‘s The French Lieutenant’s Woman (1981); a Jesuit missionary in Roland Joffe‘s The Mission (1986); a pair of twisted twins in David Cronenberg‘s Dead Ringers (1988); a murder suspect in Steven Soderbergh‘s Kafka (1991); a shady spouse in Barbet Schroeder‘s Reversal of Fortune (1991); a Machiavellian lion in Roger Allers and Rob Minkoff‘s The Lion King (1994); a child predator in Adrian Lyne‘s Lolita (1997); a cheating/cheated-upon husband in Istvan Szabo‘s Being Julia (2004); and a debtor in Michael Radford‘s The Merchant of Venice (2004).

And now comes another: the slithery corporate titan John Tuld — which sounds to me a lot like Dick Fuld, the disgraced former chair of Lehman Brothers — in first-time filmmaker J.C. Chandor‘s timely Wall Street drama Margin Call. The star-studded indie that debuted at Sundance in Jan. was released on Oct. 21 and has been very warmly received by critics and VOD consumers. Irons only enters the film in its third act, but he absolutely dominates it during every subsequent moment in which he appears onscreen. Consequently, he is receiving his loudest awards buzz in years and could — despite being passed over by the BFCA, SAG, and HFPA last week (probably because he’s part of such a large and impressive ensemble from which it is hard to single out only one or two individuals) — earn his first invitation to the Academy Awards since he won the best actor Oscar 21 years ago.

Irons and I discussed all of the above — and more — during our time together, and I hope that you’ll tune in to our conversation at the top of this post.