Jeremy Irons Attends T.S. Eliot Festival at Little Gidding

Jeremy Irons was at Little Gidding Church in Huntingdon, England, on Sunday 9 July 2017.  He read the poem Little Gidding.  

Thank you to Simon Kershaw, Carry Akroyd and the TS Eliot Society for the photos.

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Jeremy Irons Recording Entire T.S. Eliot Canon for BBC Radio

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Jeremy Irons recording entire TS Eliot canon, July 2016

Following his acclaimed recordings of The Waste Land, Four Quartets, Prufrock and the Practical Cats,  Jeremy Irons is in the process of recording the remaining TS Eliot poems for BBC Radio 4, in order to complete his readings of the poet’s entire canon.

This was revealed at the TS Eliot Festival 2016 by Jeremy Howe, Commissioning Editor for Drama and Fiction for BBC Radio 4. Howe has been responsible for commissioning Irons’s readings to date, and was discussing the recordings and their qualities before the Festival audience.

Howe also revealed that he is considering a way in which all of the recordings might then be broadcast in chronological sequence, in a major single broadcast event which would reflect Eliot’s development throughout his poetic career.

Jeremy Irons to Pay Homage to T.S. Eliot at Wilton’s Music Hall

From The London Library

The London Library announced today that Jeremy Irons, Simon Russell Beale, Fiona Shaw, and Ben Whishaw will be taking centre stage in the Library’s special celebration of T.S. Eliot on 21st October 2015.

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Taking place at Wilton’s Music Hall – one of the country’s most atmospheric theatres – the single performance promises to be a unique tribute to one of the world’s best known writers.

Philip Spedding, Development Director at The London Library said, “Jeremy Irons, Simon Russell Beale, Fiona Shaw, and Ben Whishaw are intimately associated with some of the most powerful recent performances of Eliot’s work. We are delighted that they are coming together for what promises to be a memorable tribute to a genuinely great writer”.

The evening of readings is looking to include extracts from a range of T.S. Eliot’s work including The Love Song of J. Alfred PrufrockFour QuartetsThe Waste LandThe Hollow Men and Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats.

With tickets on sale to the public, alongside an invited audience of special guests, all proceeds from the evening at Wilton’s Music Hall will go to support The London Library, a charity which is one of the world’s largest independent lending libraries and will be celebrating its 175th year in 2016.

Tickets for this special fundraising evening are £55 (£45 for London Library members). The performance will take place at 7.30pm on 21st October at Wilton’s Music Hall, 1 Graces Alley, London E1 8JB. To book, telephone Wilton’s (020 7702 2789) or visit www.wiltons.org.uk.

For further information contact: Julian Lloyd, Head of Communications, The London Library; Julian.lloyd@londonlibrary.co.uk

Jeremy Irons in Cotswold Life Magazine

Jeremy Irons is featured in the August 2015 issue of Cotswold Life magazine, in an article by Katie Jarvis, with photos by Antony Thompson.

A physical copy of the issue can be purchased online HERE for £3.99.  The issue is also available to purchase and download in digital format, for a lower price.

All images and text ©Cotswold Life and Antony Thompson at Thousand Word Media.

Click on the images below for larger views:

Jeremy Irons Reads TS Eliot’s ‘Four Quartets’

BBC Radio 4 iPlayer – link to the original recording

Click below to listen to the full audio:

Audio property of BBC Radio. No copyright infringement intended.

The text of ‘Four Quartets’ may be found HERE.

Jeremy Irons reads Four Quartets by T.S.Eliot.

Four Quartets is the culminating achievement of T.S. Eliot’s career as a poet. While containing some of the most musical and unforgettable passages in twentieth-century poetry, its four parts, ‘Burnt Norton’, ‘East Coker’, ‘The Dry Salvages’ and ‘Little Gidding’, present a rigorous meditation on the spiritual, philosophical and personal themes which preoccupied the author. It was the way in which a private voice was heard to speak for the concerns of an entire generation, in the midst of war and doubt, that confirmed it as an enduring masterpiece.

With an introduction by Michael Symmons Roberts, Lord David Alton and Gail McDonald.

jeremy irons four quartets bbc radio 4

Jeremy Irons at the 2013 Hay Festival

Jeremy Irons read Four Quartets by TS Eliot on Saturday 1 June.  He introduced a screening of Trashed and also was a part of the Poetry of the Great War readings on Sunday 2 June.

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Click HERE for audio of Jeremy Irons, Sinead Cusack and Rupert Evans reading The Poetry of the Great War. The actors read Josephine Hart’s programme featuring the work of Owen, Yeats, Sassoon and many others. Introduced by Francine Stock.
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Jeremy Irons on his love for TS Eliot – from The Telegraph

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Here are some photos and feedback from the weekend (Click on the thumbnails for larger images):

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Photos and more from the US/UK Exchange

Photo by Ben Carpenter

Photo by Ben Carpenter

Photo by Ben Carpenter

At the Old Vic New Voices US/UK Exchange launch on 23 February, Jeremy Irons read from TS Eliot’s Four Quartets .

Many thanks to Corinne Furness, who attended the launch, for this account of the event:

“Jeremy Irons was introduced at the event as representing the T S Eliot foundation (who are sponsoring the exchange) who had asked him to read some of Eliot’s work. He was clean shaven and had his trousers tucked into a pair of boots!

Before he did the reading he told a story about going to New York for the first time: He was filming on a boat on the way back from New York but it meant he had a few days in New York. He was walking down Madison Avenue and asked someone where Fifth Avenue was – the man replied ‘what do you think I am – an information bureau?’ which he thought was a brilliant line (Only Jeremy got the punch line of that wrong to start with saying ‘what do you think I am – an employment agency?’ and then joked that he was thinking ahead of himself). He then said he went into a shop and there was a man talking as he bought a cigar and all that Jeremy could think was ‘everyone here talks like they’re in a movie’ and, subsequently, that for a long time whenever he had to do an American accent he thought he sounded like he was in a movie and that there was something disingenuous about it.

He then went on to say that he’d read Eliot’s poetry before with Eliot’s widow Valerie and that he ‘must have done something right’ as they seemed to like it. He then read from the first section of Four Quartets (‘Burnt Norton’, part 3) before saying that he had to leave to go rehearse!”

According to the Old Vic New Voices twitter feed, over 400 people were in attendance at the launch.

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