First Look: Max Irons in ‘The White Queen’

Max Irons will next be seen in the STARZ original series ‘The White Queen’ airing this August on STARZ.

Jeremy Irons on ‘5 Para a Meia-Noite’

Jeremy Irons was on the Portuguese television programme “5 Para a Meia-Noite” on 26 March 2013. Jeremy was presented with a bottle of port from 1948, the year he was born. Also on the programme was his Night Train to Lisbon co-star Nicolau Breyner.

Watch the video of the programme HERE.

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Jeremy Irons to Attend Energy for Tomorrow Conference

PROGRAM ADDITION – APRIL 24 EVENING
(THE EVE OF THE CONFERENCE)

There will be a screening of the documentary “Trashed” on the eve of the conference. Seats are limited and the screening will be open to the public. Confirmed conference participants will get priority. The screening will be followed by a conversation with the executive producer, Jeremy Irons.

The screening will be held on 7 pm, Wednesday, April 24 at Florence Gould Hall, 55 East 59th Street. No audio recording or photography will be allowed.

Public tickets can be purchased here: http://www.nytimes.com/marketing/screening/index.html

Confirmed speakers:
Jeremy Irons, actor and executive producer, “Trashed”
in conversation with David Carr, media and culture columnist, The New York Times

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On April 25th –

10:40 – 11 a.m.
COLUMNIST CONVERSATION
Jeremy Irons, actor and executive producer, “Trashed”
in conversation with Andrew Revkin, Op-Ed columnist and author, Dot Earth blog, The New York Times

*Please note, there is a screening of “Trashed” on the eve of the conference. Seats are limited and the screening will be open to the public. Confirmed conference participants will get priority.

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Official press release from The New York Times Company:

Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Sec. Shaun Donovan and Jeremy Irons Join Lineup for New York Times Energy for Tomorrow Conference April 25

NEW YORK, March 11, 2013 – The New York Times today announced that New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg will deliver a keynote address at its second annual Energy for Tomorrow conference on Thursday, April 25, at TheTimesCenter.  Mayor Bloomberg will address the conference’s theme of building sustainable cities and the question of what we, as global citizens, want from our cities.

Shaun Donovan, U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, will join New York Times Op-Ed columnist Thomas Friedman in conversation to discuss the Obama administration’s vision for city development as our urban populations grow worldwide.

Jeremy Irons, Academy Award-winning actor and activist, will also speak at the conference about solutions for better waste management and his documentary, “Trashed,” which looks at the challenges posed by waste to the environment and how we can enact change for a cleaner world. 

Confirmed conference attendees will be invited to a special screening of “Trashed” with free admission on the eve of the conference, Wednesday, April 24.  A talk with executive producer Jeremy Irons and New York Times media and culture columnist David Carr will follow the screening.

Additional New York Times speakers and moderators at Energy for Tomorrow will include Op-Ed columnists Mark Bittman, Bill Keller and Joe Nocera; DealBook founder and columnist Andrew Ross Sorkin; energy and environmental issues reporter John Broder; architecture critic Michael Kimmelman; Op-Ed writer for the Dot Earth blog Andrew Revkin; and international environment correspondent Elisabeth Rosenthal.

Energy for Tomorrow is by invitation only and will be available to the public via live stream, which is free to view, at www.NYTEnergyforTomorrow.com.

The conference will open at 8:00 a.m. with a New York Times newsroom panel breakfast session that explores the issues of climate change, now at the top of the political agenda.

The New York Times Energy for Tomorrow conference series brings together thought leaders from across energy and environment industries to discuss the most urgent and important issues at hand and to explore different ways of fueling our evolving, global economy.

BlackBerry joins The New York Times as presenting sponsor of the 2013 Energy for Tomorrow conference.

To request an invitation to attend and to learn more about the conference, visit www.NYTEnergyforTomorrow.com.

About The New York Times Company

The New York Times Company (NYSE:NYT), a leading global, multimedia news and information company with 2012 revenues of $2.0 billion, includes The New York Times, the International Herald Tribune, The Boston Globe, NYTimes.com, BostonGlobe.com, Boston.com and related properties. The Company’s core purpose is to enhance society by creating, collecting and distributing high-quality news and information.

Contact: Stephanie Yera, 212-556-1957, stephanie.yera@nytimes.com

This press release can be downloaded from www.nytco.com.

Jeremy Irons at the Soldiering On Awards 2013

Jeremy Irons attended and presented an award at the 2013 Soldiering On Awards at the Park Plaza Hotel in London on 23 March. Jeremy presented the Canine Award to Allen Parton and his fantastic dog EJ.  Allen Parton is the founder of Hounds for Heroes.

Jeremy Irons, Lizzie Miller,Soldering On Chairman Sqn Ldr Tal Lambert MBE and Allen and EJ Parton

Jeremy Irons, Lizzie Miller,Soldering On Chairman Sqn Ldr Tal Lambert MBE and Allen and EJ Parton

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Via @ShowbizSimonW on Twitter

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Photo via Paul Wooding on yfrog

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Via @OliviaMeeLDN on Twitter

Allen Parton, founder of Hounds for Heroes, with his dog EJ

Allen Parton, founder of Hounds for Heroes, with his dog EJ

Jeremy Irons – Lisbon, Portugal Premiere of ‘Night Train to Lisbon’

Jeremy Irons was in Portugal to promote his recent film Night Train to Lisbon and to attend the premiere in Lisbon.

LISBON – The Mayor of Lisbon, Antonio Costa, was present at the press conference at the Cinemate Zon Audio on March 19 at 18:00 to mark the national premiere of the film “Night Train to Lisbon”, the held at King’s Hall in Rossio Station. Also in attendance were director Bille August, actors Jeremy Irons, Martina Gedeck, Beatriz Batarda, Nicholas Breyner and Marco D’Almeida, as well as the author of the book, Pascal Mercier.

6-minute Exclusive Video Interview from CARAS TV Portugal Jeremy Irons is interviewed and is also shown at a photo shoot.

Photos by Goncalo Rosa da Silva of Jeremy Irons walking through the Alfama area of Lisbon, Portugal can be seen HERE and HERE.

 

 

Video – Interview with Sic Noticias

Video – Press Conference and Behind the Scenes of Filming Night Train to Lisbon

Video – Jeremy Irons interviewed by TVI24

16-minute Audio Interview with Nicholau Breyner and Jeremy Irons from RTP

Video – Jeremy Irons at the Premiere of Night Train to Lisbon from RTP Noticias

Video interview with Jeremy Irons from Lisbon, Portugal

PDF Print Format interview with Jeremy Irons in Lisbon (entirely in Portuguese)

Video from the Press Conference for Night Train to Lisbon

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NTTL portugal 42 photo via Citroen Portugal on Flickr

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Antestreia do filme 'Comboio Nocturno para Lisboa'

Antestreia do filme 'Comboio Nocturno para Lisboa'

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Jeremy Irons Photographed by Monika Hofler

Jeremy Irons was photographed for The New York Times Style Magazine, in Budapest, Hungary, by Monika Hofler.

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Jeremy Irons – Migros Magazine Interview

Original interview in German

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Published in issue 11-MM
11th March 2013
Author – Ralf Kaminski

British actor Jeremy Irons (64) is among the very biggest stars of international cinema. Since his breakthrough in 1981 with the TV, “Brideshead Revisited” and the movies with “The French Lieutenant’s Woman,” he is constantly present in movies and television. His specialty are shady characters, whether it be the 40-year-old literature professor who falls in “Lolita” (1997) for precocious 12-year-olds, or the ruthless bank boss in “Margin Call” (2011), the financial crisis in the largest provides a way to rake in more money.

Irons has been married since 1978, with the Irish actress Sinéad Cusack, they have two grown sons, one of whom, Max, is also an actor. The couple lives partly in Oxfordshire (UK), and partly in a self-renovated Irish castle in West Cork. In the coming weeks, Jeremy Irons is seen in three ways: first as a teacher Raimund Gregorius in Bille August’s “Night Train to Lisbon ‘, based on the novel by the Swiss author Pascal Mercier (in cinemas from March 7). Once head of the family of a witch clan in fantasy film “Beautiful Creatures” (in cinemas from April 3). And finally, also known as Rodrigo Borgia, Pope Alexander VI. in the TV series “The Borgias” (the third season running in the U.S. on April 14 on).

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“It’s great fun to play people who reinvent themselves for their own rules”

The British film star Jeremy Irons plays the main role in the film adaptation of Pascal Mercier’s “Night Train to Lisbon”. Before the premiere in Bern, he spoke to the Migros magazine about shooting, his other projects and his penchant for shady characters.

A world star you meet not every day. And British actor Jeremy Irons (64) has a reputation during filming is not always easy to be because of a certain tendency towards perfectionism. The slight nervousness turns out to be unfounded. Irons is not only extremely friendly, he is also very relaxed. Middle of a conversation, he gets up, fishes a tobacco package from his overcoat pocket, rolls a cigarette and walked with it to the balcony door of the hotel room as he continues to answer questions. He then puffing contentedly out into the icy Bern air, behind him on the wall of the room large a Non smoking signs …
Jeremy Irons, in the next few weeks you will be featured in three completely different roles. As a somewhat conservative Latin teacher in “Night Train to Lisbon”, as scheming Pope in the third season of “The Borgias” and as head of the family of a witch clan in “Beautiful Creatures.” How do you choose your roles?

Always for very different reasons. “Night Train” has attracted me in many ways. I like director Bille August, we have worked together before and then also shot in Lisbon, a great city. And I liked the book extraordinary, as I read it then. It seemed, however, that it would be difficult to film because it is so much revolves around ideas and philosophical questions. But if someone hinkriegt then Bille August. So I thought that might be a very nice five weeks, and so it was.
“The Borgias” is a rare excursions into your television, you can delay the first left?

Not really. Nowadays fewer and fewer films are being shot out of the way I like to do: movies, which are directed more to a smaller audience, but still cost quite a bit. More and more writers wander therefore from the television, where he produced many great quality series currently. Neil Jordan, whom I admire very much, did that too, after he had tried once before about ten years ago to make a movie out of the material. And he asked me if I would take on the lead role. It was one of these projects, as I like them, and it’s a really great role. So I said yes and am now engaged in five months.
That’s quite a time commitment, it was therefore already in collisions with other projects?

Until now. Or if so, then my agent told me nothing about it (laughs). So far it has been successful, so to work around.
“Beautiful Creatures” seems to be a relatively unusual choice of roles …

It’s not a movie I would see myself in the movies. But I had not worked for some time for a major Hollywood studio, and I know that this strip as part of “Twilight” are very popular. The figure has wit and a couple of nice scenes. So I thought, why not?
You sometimes take roles because they pay well?

I did that about three times in my life, and it’s been a while. “Dungeons & Dragons” is an example, and then there was a film in which I played someone with a white face … I do not come just for the title …
“The Time Machine”?

Exactly. I’ve done both while I renovated our little castle in Ireland. Since it was very useful to get a good fee.
When was the last time you have to audition for a role?

Phew, that was long ago. After drama school for roles in the theater, or about the age of 22. Nowadays, I get offers and decide what I want or do not want.
There are times that you absolutely want to have a role, but do not get it?

It happens, but the last time is also a long time ago. I would have loved to have had Robert Redford’s role in “Out of Africa”, the director Sydney Pollack unconvinced. He and Redford were good friends.
The presentation of “Night Train to Lisbon” discussed many philosophical questions, and religion is a recurring theme. Are you a believer?

These questions were the reason that I was attracted by the project. I’m quite a spiritual person, I believe in a whole lot. But I’m not one to like to hear about a group or club. My wife and my children are Catholic, and I myself was baptized Protestant. But religion is not such a big issue in the family. Whenever we go to church at Christmas and Easter, then a Catholic with us in the area. It is a kind of center for a very widely dispersed community, and follow whatever is completely there. It is always very nice. This church is like the glue that holds together the people.
About 20 years ago, have you ever filmed with Bille August in Lisbon. How he has changed since then, as the city?

He has not changed one bit. More children he has, but that’s it already. I also believe that I have not changed that much. Nevertheless, everything was new, because it was about a whole different story. And we turned in another corner of the city, especially in the old city – beautiful, especially because it crumbles a bit to himself.
Did Bille August? Much freedom left in the interpretation of the figure, or he knew exactly what he wanted?

He knows very well what he wants. But he also looks for the people that he knows that they bring him. If you do something that does not fit him, he says that too. Which is good. A director is a kind of sounding board that you need as an actor. The hope is that you hit the right note, but can never be sure, because you do not even see or hear. Since it needs someone who helps in fine-tuning. This of course requires that you trust the taste of the director what I do at Bille.
But that was it different?

Oh yes, I will not mention names here but.
And then you rebel?

It is often only realized when you see the finished film. During filming, I thought: Well, but that can not be justified. Then I saw the movie and thought, oh no, all wrong, we should do it the way I wanted it.
You have enjoyed your short visit in Bern during filming last year, I have read. How well do you know Switzerland?

Not very good, unfortunately. I go once in a while skiing in St. Moritz, and now by the way again after that visit here in Bern. But that’s it for now.
“The Borgias” You’re yes then for television, is somehow different?

Not at all. It’s like being on a movie set, even a bit more luxurious, we have more time and better equipment. But that’s just because it’s a quality series. I have friends in the U.S. turn the soaps, which sounds much less pleasant.
Rodrigo Borgia is a very complex character, a ruthless schemer. And yet you play it so that you like him, and hopes that its work plans.

A very interesting character. I read a lot about him, a lot of research, and has opened up a very wide spectrum character, I can work with. The popes after him have hated him, and their interpretation of it has come to dominate. This has ruined the reputation of the Borgia family rather, with all the stories of incest, for example. I am convinced that this is a caricature, and how I interpret it too. I’m looking for the nuances, the contradictions that we all have within us. We behave sometimes good and sometimes bad.
They like to play these kinds of characters, right? About in “Lolita” …

This role interpretation have taken me some really bad.
You played the seducer of a 12-year-olds to “nice”?

I was asked: How could you do that? My answer: people who do bad things are not necessarily bad.
However, you seem to play the bad guys like to correct: “The Time Machine,” “Die Hard with a Vengeance” …

Oh yes. Why are bad guys bad? Because they do not follow the rules, they find their own way, outside the conventions of society. It’s great fun to play people who invent their own rules. And it gives the audience the opportunity to watch people who behave like they normally can not, but secretly would probably also like.
You once said that you are particularly proud of “Dead Ringers,” “Lolita” and “The Mission”. Does that still?

In “Lolita” I could not really show all that I can, it is certainly my most complete film. On the other two I’m still proud, though I’m never as good as I would have liked.
“Lolita” was a risky role, you smoke, you ride a motorcycle – you obviously like to flirt with danger.

In fact. Risks brings enrichment to life. I’ve also never regretted. If something does not work out as hoped, then I say to myself, okay, but it seemed to make sense, as I have decided to make it so. So, what the heck. Do not regret, but just keep going. I try not to look back, not forward, but to live in the moment.
They always say that it had to do with smoking, that you have such a great voice. But I know some smokers, and none has such a voice! How do you do that?

(Laughs) I have no idea. She just is. Good genes! And of course it’s great to have something that stands out.
Is it true that on a film set can sometimes be difficult because you are a perfectionist like that?

That was probably one way, but I’ve put it behind me. Today I am much more relaxed and try to have a good time especially. If all fun and relaxed, it increases the chance that they will do a good job.
Your wife and your sons are indeed also worked as an actor. Look at each of your films to give advice and criticize?

That’s what we do. However, the movie business has changed dramatically since the time when we started. This makes it difficult for us, a young actor to give career advice. But it is important to know what we think of his work. The same goes for me and my wife when it comes to our films.
Has your wife ever really criticized heavily for one of your works?

Oh yes, and how. I once played some time ago in London theater. She looked at the dress rehearsal and then said: “Thou art really bad in the play” (laughs)
Very often, you do not look likely. All are constantly traveling somewhere and making films. Is not it hard sometimes?

Oh, because we have become accustomed, it was ever thus. We meet when we can. Our sons both live in London. And if we are spending time together, we enjoy it even more.