Jeremy Irons at ‘Trashed’ Screening in Kingston

Jeremy Irons attended a screening of his film Trashed, at the Tiffin Boys School in Kingston Upon Thames, Surrey, UK, on Friday 18 October 2013.  He participated in a Q&A session, after the film.

The screening was organised and hosted by Zac Goldsmith, MP for Richmond Park and North Kingston.

Photo via @qcrescent on Twitter

Photo via @qcrescent on Twitter

Photo via @nicjnic on Twitter

Photo via @nicjnic on Twitter

Photo via @BlueFoxCAFH on Twittter

Photo via @BlueFoxCAFH on Twittter

Photo via @GreenUponThames on Twitter

Photo via @GreenUponThames on Twitter

Photo via @kewgreen on Twitter

Photo via @kewgreen on Twitter

Photo via @ChristineElmer on Twitter

Photo via @ChristineElmer on Twitter

Photo via @qcrescent on Twitter

Photo via @qcrescent on Twitter

Photo via @GreenUponThames on Twittter

Photo via @GreenUponThames on Twittter

Photo via @tabacaria on Twitter

Photo via @tabacaria on Twitter

Jeremy Irons to attend ‘Trashed’ screening in Kingston, Surrey

Jeremy Irons will be at the Tiffin Boys’ School in Kingston-on-Thames, Surrey,  on Friday 18 October 2013, at 7:30pm, for a special showing of Trashed

trashed 4 image

He will be taking questions from the audience after the film.

Address: Tiffin School, Queen Elizabeth Rd, Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey KT2 6RL, United Kingdom

The event will be hosted by north Kingston and Richmond Park MP Zac Goldsmith.

The event is free but tickets will be allocated on a first come first served basis.

To reserve a seat, email zac@zacgoldsmith.com

Read the press release on Zac Goldsmith’s website.

Jeremy Irons at the World Actors Forum

Jeremy Irons was in Dublin, Ireland at the Gate Theatre on Saturday 15 June 2013, to participate in the World Actors Forum. Trashed was screened at the WAF and, afterward, Jeremy was interviewed by Joseph O’Connor.

On the same day, Jeremy Irons was present at University College Dublin, to see Sinead Cusack receive an Honorary Doctorate Degree.

WAF 4

The World Actors Forum 2013 from ALONG CAME A SPIDER on Vimeo.

Photo via @IrishFilmmakers on Twitter

Photo via @IrishFilmmakers on Twitter

Photo via Conor Furlong on Instagram

Photo via Conor Furlong on Instagram

Photo via @SticksStonesIRL on Twitter

Photo via @SticksStonesIRL on Twitter

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Jeremy Irons Attends Taormina Film Festival

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Scroll down for videos.

ROME — Italy’s Taormina Film Festival featured a mix of international blockbusters, smaller dramas and comedies in its famous Teatro Antico venue, with a list of Hollywood A-Listers on tap, as the 59-year-old festival continues its return to good health after a “near-death” experience last year.

taormina venue

The festival ran from June 15-22 in Taormina, Italy.

Trashed was screened on Wednesday, June 19 at 10:00 in the Convention Center – Hall A. Jeremy Irons was part of a Tao Class held on Wednesday, June 19 at 11.45 at the Hall A of the Convention Center.

Jeremy Irons was a recipient of the Taormina Arte Award. Here’s what the festival’s website has to say about Jeremy and the award (translated from Italian):

“Taormina Arte Award – Jeremy Irons
It ‘an interpreter of natural elegance, often also enjoys coloring and embellishing the prestigious cinematic tradition of British actors who wear the clothes of the “bad” with a pronounced English accent (even in a western like Appaloosa) or return to the origins of its training at the Old Vic appearing in reductions to Shakespeare as The Merchant of Venice. And ‘the most respected performers in English, starring theatrical films (like Callas Forever, Australia, The House of the Spirits), but also original and insightful studies of the author (Cronenberg’s Dead Ringers, Bertolucci’s Stealing Beauty, The French Lieutenant’s Woman of Reisz), but it will be in Taormina not only to speak of himself, of his excellent filmography, his acting style that blends technical and introspective fragility, authority and underground emotional outbursts, but mostly as a writer, producer and observer Trashed of Candida Brady, a film that takes in hand the risks to the food chain and the environment caused by pollution of air, land and sea. Looking at most of the planet, from Iceland to Indonesia, we discover surprising truth about imminent threats that surround us and our health, like the microplastic: plastic remnants infinitely small that fill the seas and, consequently, the fish, including those that end up on our tables. In Trashed, the actor takes us on a fascinating and disturbing to discover the devastating impact of human waste, more and more toxic than in the past. Also for his commitment, as well as the extraordinary career, the Festival pays homage to him with the Taormina Arte Award. ”

Jeremy Irons in Italy – June 2013

Jeremy Irons attended a press conference in Firenze (Florence), Italy, ahead of the Festival of Writers, where he read from Machiavelli’s The Prince and some works of Vladimir Nabokov, including Lolita.

He also introduced a screening of Trashed in Florence, Italy at the Odeon Cinema and participated in a panel discussion of the issues discussed in the film.

Fantastic album of photos by Francesca Battilani of Jeremy at the Trashed screening.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Jeremy Irons on CBS Sunday Morning

Source

Irons_garbage_244x183

Jeremy Irons talks trash

In the 1995 movie “Die Hard: With a Vengeance,” Jeremy Irons was pure evil as an urbane and elegant bad guy.

As Simon Gruber, he terrorized pre-9/11 New York City, practically in the shadow of the still-intact World Trade Center towers.

Scary stuff . . . but it’s nothing compared to Jeremy Irons’ latest film.

In the new documentary “Trashed,” Irons shows us the terrifying possibility of a future world buried in its own garbage.

“After doing the documentary, how conscious are you, when you walk down the street, of trash?” asked Smith.

“Well, I mean, this part of New York is wonderful, there’s no trash in sight,” Irons said. “And I think it’s a case of out of sight, out of mind.”

“We throw it away and it’s gone?”

“That’s right. It’s clean, it’s lovely, it’s not something we have to worry about. But where does it go?”

Where, indeed? In Indonesia, garbage goes in the nearest river, and eventually out to sea. Worldwide, according to the film, Americans could recycle 90 percent of the waste we generate, but right now we only recycle a third of that — and some of our trash eventually finds its way back into us — such as plastics leeching into our food supply.

It’s weird to see an Oscar-winning actor rooting through trash cans in New York City’s nicest neighborhood, but for Irons, garbage has become, well, personal.

He pulled out one object: “Now this is recyclable, this is great, but it’s half full, so it’s wasted food. Coconut water: Fantastic for you, 100% pure, and it’s thrown away half-full. We waste a huge amount of the food we buy.”

“You have no hesitation to just pick through the trash, Jeremy?” Smith asked.

“No, it’s rubbish. That’s all it is. It’s just dirt. A bit of dirt before you die is good.”

“Celebrities get asked to be involved in a lot of different causes; what was it about trash that made you say, ‘I have to do something’?” asked Smith.

“I wanted to make a documentary about something which I thought was important and which was curable,” he said. “It’s not rocket science. It takes a little effort, it takes a little thought. It takes a little education. I think most people want to do what is right. But they need a bit of organization.

“We make everybody wear seatbelts now. That was a bore, wasn’t it? But we do it, and we don’t think about it anymore. Very simple to do the same with how we deal with our garbage.”

It might not be easy to picture Jeremy Irons as a garbage activist: From his breakout role in 1981’s “The French Lieutenant’s Woman,” he has been in more than 40 movies, at least as many plays, and has won just about every acting award there is.

“I’ve been very lucky,” he said.

“You have a slew of awards that would say you got some talent,” Smith suggested.

“Yeah, if awards mean that. Yeah. Yeah.”

“You don’t think they mean much?”

“I do. I do. And I really don’t want to denigrate them. I think awards are fantastic. I don’t let them go to my head. I always, when I start a new piece of work, I still feel like a plumber, but I don’t know how to do it. I just sort of feel out of my depths — I’m not very good at plumbing!”

Well, he’s good at something. Born in England in 1948, Jeremy John Irons trained as a stage actor before breaking into film.

He’s been married to actress Sinead Cusack since 1978, with whom he has two sons. But on-screen he hasn’t always been such a devoted husband.

In 1990’s “Reversal of Fortune,” Irons was cast as socialite Claus von Bulow, accused of trying to kill his rich wife by giving her an overdose of insulin.

“Did you love getting in Claus von Bulow’s head?” Smith asked.

“I was slightly embarrassed,” Irons said, “and in fact fought off playing him for a while, because he was alive and I thought there was something tasteless about pretending to be someone who was still alive. And so I fought against it. Finally it was Glenn Close who persuaded me. She said, ‘If you don’t play him someone else will play him. You know, come on. Have a crack at it. It’s interesting.'”

Glenn Close was right: the performance earned him the Oscar for Best Actor.

Irons’ Claus von Bulow is a saint compared with his current role in the Showtime series, “The Borgias.” Irons is Pope Alexander VI, a man of many passions.

Off-screen, you might say Irons has become the unofficial pope of recycling — and, in what may be his most important role yet, an elegant and refined voice of caution.

Are we doomed?, Smith asked “I don’t believe we’re doomed because I believe that human nature is extraordinary,” Irons said. ” I think we will be brought to our senses eventually. I think things may have to get worse. I think, I hope we will be brought to our senses. We’re on a highway to a very expensive and unhealthy future if we do nothing.”

“And gloomy future,” Smith added.

“Well, the sun will still shine,” Irons replied.

Jeremy Irons at New York Times Energy for Tomorrow Conference

Jeremy Irons was a featured speaker at the New York Times Energy for Tomorrow Conference in New York City on Thursday, April 25, 2013.  He was interviewed by New York Times columnist Andrew Revkin about the film Trashed.

The New York Times Energy for Tomorrow conference featured Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s Food Waste Challenge announcement, where the Mayor talked for the first time about the City program with more than 100 restaurants to reduce organic waste sent to landfills; and a talk with Academy Award-winner Jeremy Irons on his documentary, “Trashed,” and the steps we can take in our daily lives to reduce waste.

You can watch the entire conference, broken up by panel, on demand at www.NYTEnergyforTomorrow.com.

Visit Andrew Revkin’s Dot Earth blog to see video of Jeremy at the conference and read more from Andrew Revkin.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.