Jeremy Irons at the World Actors Forum

Jeremy Irons was in Dublin, Ireland at the Gate Theatre on Saturday 15 June 2013, to participate in the World Actors Forum. Trashed was screened at the WAF and, afterward, Jeremy was interviewed by Joseph O’Connor.

On the same day, Jeremy Irons was present at University College Dublin, to see Sinead Cusack receive an Honorary Doctorate Degree.

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The World Actors Forum 2013 from ALONG CAME A SPIDER on Vimeo.

Photo via @IrishFilmmakers on Twitter

Photo via @IrishFilmmakers on Twitter

Photo via Conor Furlong on Instagram

Photo via Conor Furlong on Instagram

Photo via @SticksStonesIRL on Twitter

Photo via @SticksStonesIRL on Twitter

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Jeremy Irons in Italy – June 2013

Jeremy Irons attended a press conference in Firenze (Florence), Italy, ahead of the Festival of Writers, where he read from Machiavelli’s The Prince and some works of Vladimir Nabokov, including Lolita.

He also introduced a screening of Trashed in Florence, Italy at the Odeon Cinema and participated in a panel discussion of the issues discussed in the film.

Fantastic album of photos by Francesca Battilani of Jeremy at the Trashed screening.

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Jeremy Irons at the 2013 Hay Festival

Jeremy Irons read Four Quartets by TS Eliot on Saturday 1 June.  He introduced a screening of Trashed and also was a part of the Poetry of the Great War readings on Sunday 2 June.

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Click HERE for audio of Jeremy Irons, Sinead Cusack and Rupert Evans reading The Poetry of the Great War. The actors read Josephine Hart’s programme featuring the work of Owen, Yeats, Sassoon and many others. Introduced by Francine Stock.
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Jeremy Irons on his love for TS Eliot – from The Telegraph

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Here are some photos and feedback from the weekend (Click on the thumbnails for larger images):

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Jeremy Irons on CBS Sunday Morning

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Jeremy Irons talks trash

In the 1995 movie “Die Hard: With a Vengeance,” Jeremy Irons was pure evil as an urbane and elegant bad guy.

As Simon Gruber, he terrorized pre-9/11 New York City, practically in the shadow of the still-intact World Trade Center towers.

Scary stuff . . . but it’s nothing compared to Jeremy Irons’ latest film.

In the new documentary “Trashed,” Irons shows us the terrifying possibility of a future world buried in its own garbage.

“After doing the documentary, how conscious are you, when you walk down the street, of trash?” asked Smith.

“Well, I mean, this part of New York is wonderful, there’s no trash in sight,” Irons said. “And I think it’s a case of out of sight, out of mind.”

“We throw it away and it’s gone?”

“That’s right. It’s clean, it’s lovely, it’s not something we have to worry about. But where does it go?”

Where, indeed? In Indonesia, garbage goes in the nearest river, and eventually out to sea. Worldwide, according to the film, Americans could recycle 90 percent of the waste we generate, but right now we only recycle a third of that — and some of our trash eventually finds its way back into us — such as plastics leeching into our food supply.

It’s weird to see an Oscar-winning actor rooting through trash cans in New York City’s nicest neighborhood, but for Irons, garbage has become, well, personal.

He pulled out one object: “Now this is recyclable, this is great, but it’s half full, so it’s wasted food. Coconut water: Fantastic for you, 100% pure, and it’s thrown away half-full. We waste a huge amount of the food we buy.”

“You have no hesitation to just pick through the trash, Jeremy?” Smith asked.

“No, it’s rubbish. That’s all it is. It’s just dirt. A bit of dirt before you die is good.”

“Celebrities get asked to be involved in a lot of different causes; what was it about trash that made you say, ‘I have to do something’?” asked Smith.

“I wanted to make a documentary about something which I thought was important and which was curable,” he said. “It’s not rocket science. It takes a little effort, it takes a little thought. It takes a little education. I think most people want to do what is right. But they need a bit of organization.

“We make everybody wear seatbelts now. That was a bore, wasn’t it? But we do it, and we don’t think about it anymore. Very simple to do the same with how we deal with our garbage.”

It might not be easy to picture Jeremy Irons as a garbage activist: From his breakout role in 1981’s “The French Lieutenant’s Woman,” he has been in more than 40 movies, at least as many plays, and has won just about every acting award there is.

“I’ve been very lucky,” he said.

“You have a slew of awards that would say you got some talent,” Smith suggested.

“Yeah, if awards mean that. Yeah. Yeah.”

“You don’t think they mean much?”

“I do. I do. And I really don’t want to denigrate them. I think awards are fantastic. I don’t let them go to my head. I always, when I start a new piece of work, I still feel like a plumber, but I don’t know how to do it. I just sort of feel out of my depths — I’m not very good at plumbing!”

Well, he’s good at something. Born in England in 1948, Jeremy John Irons trained as a stage actor before breaking into film.

He’s been married to actress Sinead Cusack since 1978, with whom he has two sons. But on-screen he hasn’t always been such a devoted husband.

In 1990’s “Reversal of Fortune,” Irons was cast as socialite Claus von Bulow, accused of trying to kill his rich wife by giving her an overdose of insulin.

“Did you love getting in Claus von Bulow’s head?” Smith asked.

“I was slightly embarrassed,” Irons said, “and in fact fought off playing him for a while, because he was alive and I thought there was something tasteless about pretending to be someone who was still alive. And so I fought against it. Finally it was Glenn Close who persuaded me. She said, ‘If you don’t play him someone else will play him. You know, come on. Have a crack at it. It’s interesting.'”

Glenn Close was right: the performance earned him the Oscar for Best Actor.

Irons’ Claus von Bulow is a saint compared with his current role in the Showtime series, “The Borgias.” Irons is Pope Alexander VI, a man of many passions.

Off-screen, you might say Irons has become the unofficial pope of recycling — and, in what may be his most important role yet, an elegant and refined voice of caution.

Are we doomed?, Smith asked “I don’t believe we’re doomed because I believe that human nature is extraordinary,” Irons said. ” I think we will be brought to our senses eventually. I think things may have to get worse. I think, I hope we will be brought to our senses. We’re on a highway to a very expensive and unhealthy future if we do nothing.”

“And gloomy future,” Smith added.

“Well, the sun will still shine,” Irons replied.

‘Trashed’ Screening for Parliament

Trashed was screened for Members of Parliament at Portcullis House on Thursday 7 February 2013.

Trashed documentary highlights wastefulness – from resource.co.uk

Trashed documentary shown at House of Commons review from letsrecycle.com

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Photo via @FreegleBrighton on Twitter

Photo via Trashed Film on facebook

Photo via Trashed Film on facebook

Photo via Trashed Film on facebook

Photo via Trashed Film on facebook

Photo via Candida Brady on Twitter

Photo via Candida Brady on Twitter

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‘Trashed’ DVD Release Date

Trashed will be released on DVD (Region 2) on April 22, 2013.

Pre-order your copy from Amazon.co.uk

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Product details:

Actors: Jeremy Irons
Directors: Candida Brady
Format: PAL, Widescreen
Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe)
Number of discs: 1
Studio: Blenheim Films
DVD Release Date: 22 April 2013
Run Time: 97 minutes

Review
TRASHED– 5 stars – New York Daily News – Jeremy Irons takes us through a tour of the world s grotesque garbage consumption and failure to dispose of its trash, which inspires horrified reactions from both him and us. This is appalling , our Oscar-winning guide says, sitting on a debris-strewn beach in Lebanon. Seem bleak? It s supposed to, as director Candida Brady uses a thriller-ish tone to show the state of the planet. And if facts about 150 years of plastics, dioxins and dangerous castoffs don t jolt you, a visit to a hospital for malformed children will. Yet for all the poisonous truths in Trashed, there are also solid grass-roots solutions that, as presented, feel do-able and politically digestible. That helps, because everything Irons finds puts you off food. Crucial viewing for realists and alarmists both. —http://www.laweekly.com/movies/trashed-1494726/

This is appalling, says the actor Jeremy Irons, surveying a reeking mountain of consumer waste fouling a once glorious beach in Lebanon. That spoiled shoreline is only one of many revolting sights in Trashed, Candida Brady s down-and-dirty documentary about our inability to neutralize safely much of what we throw away. Taking us on a global tour of escalating rubbish and toxic disposal options, Ms. Brady rubs our faces in the poisonous consequences of littering the planet with substances that, like bedbugs and French mimes, are almost impossible to get rid of. But if we must talk trash, Mr. Irons assisted by a scientist or two and Vangelis’s doomy score is an inspired choice of guide. Soothing and sensitive, his liquid gaze alighting on oozing landfills and belching incinerators, he moves through the film with a tragic dignity that belies his whimsical neckwear and jaunty hats. Every sterile whale and plastic-choked turtle is a dagger in his heart (and will be in yours too), to say nothing of the farmers ruined by chemically contaminated livestock. By the time Mr. Irons visits a Vietnamese hospital for children with severe birth defects the legacy of Agent Orange that plastic water bottle in your hand will feel as dangerous as a Molotov cocktail. –www.nytimes.com

The world is in a heap of trouble — make that heaps: giant, toxic mountains of garbage that endanger our oceans, marine life, the atmosphere and humanity in general — without an end in sight. That is, unless citizens, industry and governments get deadly serious about such solutions as mass recycling, composting, plastics reduction and more. Such is the global crisis that’s vividly, relentlessly detailed in the vital documentary starring dulcet-voiced zero waste advocate, actor Jeremy Irons. Guided by writer-director Candida Brady, Irons (genial, studious) travels the globe visiting some of the most egregious, noxious examples of trash disposal and waste mismanagement; vast, open-air garbage dumps in Lebanon and Indonesia that infect its waterways and coastlines are particularly horrendous. It’s not a pretty picture, to say the least, with a stop in Vietnam to examine birth defects linked to wartime Agent Orange spraying proving a deeply grim offshoot of the film’s central thrust. Then there’s the garbage calamity’s most insidious culprit: non-recycled, non-biodegradable plastic. The movie, as have other eco-documentaries, chillingly examines how endless bits of the toxic material routinely flood our oceans, harm its inhabitants and find their way into the fish we eat. Scientists, doctors and academics weigh in as well, though flipside input from corporate interests and government policymakers would have added welcome dimension to this crucial discussion. —www.latimes.com/entertainment/movies/moviesnow/la-et-mn-trashed-capsule-20121214,0,7515915.story

Jeremy Irons to Attend ‘Trashed’ Preview Screening at 92Y for thoughtgallery.org

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Jeremy Irons – Trashed Preview Screening

Jeremy Irons - Trashed Preview Screening

Date/Time
12/11/2012 – 7:15 PM
From $38

Location
92nd Street Y, 1395 Lexington Ave.
212-415-5500
Official site/reserve tickets

The Oscar-winning star of such films as Reversal of FortuneThe French Lieutenant’s WomanThe MissionLolitaDead Ringers and the TV series “The Borgias,” Jeremy Irons is also a producer, director, and activist. He will join Reel Pieces moderator Annette Insdorf for an onstage discussion after a selection of clips from his movies and a preview of Trashed, which premiered at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival and will be released Dec. 14 in New York.

Irons is the executive producer of this powerful documentary, a wake-up call about global waste. Irons investigates and reveals the extensive pollution of land, water and air around the globe-a threat to the food chain and to future generations. While Irons is outraged, the film also features images of paradoxical beauty as well as a score by the renowned composer Vangelis.

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Reel Pieces – Jeremy Irons, with a Preview of “Trashed” (Candida Brady, Director, 2012, 97 minutes)

The Oscar-winning star of such films as Reversal of Fortune, The French Lieutenant’s Woman, The Mission, Lolita, Dead Ringers and the TV series The Borgias,  Jeremy Irons is also a producer, director and activist.