Max Irons on dynasties and The White Queen – The Times

Max Irons is featured in The Times from Thursday 15 August 2013.

The full article is for Times subscribers only and can be found HERE.

However, the text of the article can be read on the photos below. Click to enlarge them to full size:

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Jeremy Irons Interviewed by Scott Feinberg with Audio

From The Hollywood Reporter and Scott Feinberg’s Blog “The Race”

[Follow Scott Feinberg on Twitter @ScottFeinberg and @THR_TheRace]

  • jeremy_irons_interview_podcast.mp3
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 photo from Roadside Attractions

On Thursday morning, I had the privilege of speaking for about 30 minutes with the great London-based stage and screen actor Jeremy Irons, just minutes after his name was announced as a best actor (in a TV drama) Golden Globe nominee for his work on the critically-acclaimed Showtime series The Borgias.

Irons, 63, has already won just about every acting award that exists: an Oscar, a Golden Globe, a SAG Award, an Emmy, a Tony, an Annie, and prizes from all of the major critics groups, including the Los Angeles Film Critics Association, New York Film Critics Circle, and National Society of Film Critics. He mentions during our chat that he recently loaned his inimitable voice to a recorded reading of T.S. Eliot‘s The Waste Land, which could, hypothetically, earn him a Grammy, as well, which would make him just the 11th member of the elite EGOT club!

But, as Irons notes during our conversation, it is neither a desire for awards, nor a fondness for fame, nor even a particular passion for acting (he’s appeared in only 40 movies since his big screen debut 30 years ago) that keeps him in the game at this point in his life. Instead, it is a deep connection that he feels to certain characters that he reads, as well as a need for the creative companionship of other actors, that periodically draws him away from his various homes and hobbies and back into the fray.

The most memorable of his film roles include a lovestruck victorian in Karel Reisz‘s The French Lieutenant’s Woman (1981); a Jesuit missionary in Roland Joffe‘s The Mission (1986); a pair of twisted twins in David Cronenberg‘s Dead Ringers (1988); a murder suspect in Steven Soderbergh‘s Kafka (1991); a shady spouse in Barbet Schroeder‘s Reversal of Fortune (1991); a Machiavellian lion in Roger Allers and Rob Minkoff‘s The Lion King (1994); a child predator in Adrian Lyne‘s Lolita (1997); a cheating/cheated-upon husband in Istvan Szabo‘s Being Julia (2004); and a debtor in Michael Radford‘s The Merchant of Venice (2004).

And now comes another: the slithery corporate titan John Tuld — which sounds to me a lot like Dick Fuld, the disgraced former chair of Lehman Brothers — in first-time filmmaker J.C. Chandor‘s timely Wall Street drama Margin Call. The star-studded indie that debuted at Sundance in Jan. was released on Oct. 21 and has been very warmly received by critics and VOD consumers. Irons only enters the film in its third act, but he absolutely dominates it during every subsequent moment in which he appears onscreen. Consequently, he is receiving his loudest awards buzz in years and could — despite being passed over by the BFCA, SAG, and HFPA last week (probably because he’s part of such a large and impressive ensemble from which it is hard to single out only one or two individuals) — earn his first invitation to the Academy Awards since he won the best actor Oscar 21 years ago.

Irons and I discussed all of the above — and more — during our time together, and I hope that you’ll tune in to our conversation at the top of this post.

Jeremy Irons Interviewed for Hungarian TV

Jeremy Irons was interviewed by Nava Aniko at Korda Studios in Etyek, Hungary, recently. The 40-minute interview will be broadcast on Hungarian TV on 22 December at 20:10.

All photos by Zirig Árpåd

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In the interview, Jeremy not only spoke about movies and Hollywood, but about his worldview. He does not consider himself a politician and he does not believe in the death penalty. Jeremy also tells his view of how Budapest has changed over the years.

Also in the interview:
– he’s not into politics, and doesn’t believe in any kind of ‘-ism’
– he doesn’t attend services at the Anglican church – “my wife and kids are Catholics”
– Doesn’t believe in death penalty – “because it doesn’t stop criminality”
– why he believes in love – “God is love, and it means to me that love is the answer for everything”
– what he thinks about power, money and fame – “it means more people know me than how many I know”
– what’s his advice to his son Max – “go until you find what makes you happy”

The British actor starred in Istvan Szabo’s Being Julia in 2004, which was filmed partly in Budapest.

Irons conducts the conversation in Hungarian as well, announcing in the interview Merry Christmas greetings to all in Hungarian.

Click on the thumbnails for larger images:

Jeremy Irons in NY Times T Magazine – Hungarian Rhapsody

Hungarian Rhapsody

Culture, Travel   By KATHRYN BRANCH| September 20, 2011, 6:26 pm

Original article HERE

Photo by Monika Höfler

A rich film tradition and low production costs have long brought stars to Budapest, among them Jeremy Irons, 63, pictured here on the shores of the Danube River. Irons made “Nijinski,” his first movie in the capital, in 1980, and returned to make “M. Butterfly,” “Being Julia” and Showtime’s “The Borgias.” When not on set, Irons explores the city’s “wonderful crumbling faded beauty” on his motorcycle. “It’s very hard to find the soul of a city,” he says, but he suggests starting at the Dohany Street Synagogue (011-36-1-413-5500), the Hungarian State Opera (right; opera.hu) and the Western Railway Station (Terez korut at Nyugati ter), designed by the Eiffel Company of Paris. Irons also recommends Cafe Kor (011-36-1-311-0053; cafekor.com), Pomo D’Oro (011-36-1-302-6473; pomodorobudapest.com) and Nobu (noburestaurants.com/budapest), inside the Kempinski Hotel (011-36-1-429-3777; kempinski.com), where he usually stays.

Max Irons in Wonderland Magazine

Thank you to http://community.livejournal.com/chardwickefans/39360.html for these fantastic scans!

Max Irons is featured in the February/March 2011 issue of Wonderland magazine,  interviewed about Red Riding Hood:

Click on any image for a larger view:

Max Irons the next Robert Pattinson?

BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat has chosen Max Irons as one of the upcoming Brit actors who could follow in Robert Pattinson’s footsteps.

Who is the next Robert Pattinson?

Thursday, 13 May 2010

By Frances Cronin  – Newsbeat entertainment reporter

We know most of us all love Robert Pattinson but let’s face it he’s super busy at the moment and there’s a lot of buzz in Hollywood about upcoming Brit actors that could follow in his footsteps.

There are currently nearly a dozen films aimed at under 25s in the works in Hollywood and it seems Brit actors are in the running for quite a few of them. We’ve picked out the Brit stars of the future who could be set to take on Robert Pattinson’s mantle.

Max Irons, aged 25.

Max Irons

Max Irons has a famous dad but says that can be a disadvantage at times.

Twilight director Catherine Hardwicke made a star of R-Patz and now she’s chosen Brit Max Irons to star in her new fairytale film The Girl With the Red Riding Hood. Max will star alongside Amanda Seyfried, who has to fend off her village from a werewolf.

He has had roles in films Being Julia and Dorian Gray and he’s been a Burberry model (does that fashion range know how to spot talent or what?)  Max has good acting heritage. He’s part of two acting families, the son of top actors Jeremy Irons and Sinead Cusack.

He admits it can be awkward getting help from his dad: “People often ask you, ‘Does he mentor you?’ It’s funny that because it’s a bit like a father teaching you to drive, it’s kind of unhelpful even though they’re trying their best and it’s hard to take. But in terms of him warning me about the industry it’s always been very helpful.”

“When I made it clear that I wanted to do it [act], he said, ‘Just because I’ve been successful don’t necessarily assume it’ll be the same for you because it is, quite literally, one of the hardest businesses to succeed in’.”
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Read the full BBC Radio 1 Newsbeat article.

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Jeremy Irons to portray Archibald McIndoe in new film

A possible upcoming film project for Jeremy Irons that of Reconstruction of Warriors, based on the book of the same name by E.R. Mayhew, about pioneering New Zealand plastic surgeon, Archibald McIndoe, who worked for the Royal Air Force during World War II. He greatly improved the treatment and rehabilitation of badly burned Spitfire pilots.

All of the details are not confirmed about the project but, according to various sites on the Internet, a screenplay has been written by Ireland-based writer Steven Goldsmith. Goldsmith was hired by Kevin Byron Murphy of Titian Red Pictures. The movie would be shot in Budapest, Hungary and in Ireland.

Likely director for the project is Lajos Koltai, a cinematographer and director who frequently works with Istvan Szabo. Lajos Koltai was the cinematographer for Jeremy’s movie Being Julia. Koltai’s American film directorial debut was for Evening, starring Claire Danes, Toni Collette, Vanessa Redgrave and Meryl Streep.

Click here to read more about Sir Archibald McIndoe

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Sir Archibald McIndoe

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McIndoe and his patients

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Sir Archibald McIndoe and his patients - the Guinea Pigs

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