Jeremy Irons in Cotswold Life Magazine

Jeremy Irons is featured in the August 2015 issue of Cotswold Life magazine, in an article by Katie Jarvis, with photos by Antony Thompson.

A physical copy of the issue can be purchased online HERE for £3.99.  The issue is also available to purchase and download in digital format, for a lower price.

All images and text ©Cotswold Life and Antony Thompson at Thousand Word Media.

Click on the images below for larger views:

Jeremy Irons Reads TS Eliot’s ‘Four Quartets’

BBC Radio 4 iPlayer – link to the original recording

Click below to listen to the full audio:

Audio property of BBC Radio. No copyright infringement intended.

The text of ‘Four Quartets’ may be found HERE.

Jeremy Irons reads Four Quartets by T.S.Eliot.

Four Quartets is the culminating achievement of T.S. Eliot’s career as a poet. While containing some of the most musical and unforgettable passages in twentieth-century poetry, its four parts, ‘Burnt Norton’, ‘East Coker’, ‘The Dry Salvages’ and ‘Little Gidding’, present a rigorous meditation on the spiritual, philosophical and personal themes which preoccupied the author. It was the way in which a private voice was heard to speak for the concerns of an entire generation, in the midst of war and doubt, that confirmed it as an enduring masterpiece.

With an introduction by Michael Symmons Roberts, Lord David Alton and Gail McDonald.

jeremy irons four quartets bbc radio 4

Jeremy Irons at the 2013 Hay Festival

Jeremy Irons read Four Quartets by TS Eliot on Saturday 1 June.  He introduced a screening of Trashed and also was a part of the Poetry of the Great War readings on Sunday 2 June.

__________________________________________________________________________________________

Click HERE for audio of Jeremy Irons, Sinead Cusack and Rupert Evans reading The Poetry of the Great War. The actors read Josephine Hart’s programme featuring the work of Owen, Yeats, Sassoon and many others. Introduced by Francine Stock.
__________________________________________________________________________________________

Jeremy Irons on his love for TS Eliot – from The Telegraph

__________________________________________________________________________________

Here are some photos and feedback from the weekend (Click on the thumbnails for larger images):

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Photos and more from the US/UK Exchange

Photo by Ben Carpenter

Photo by Ben Carpenter

Photo by Ben Carpenter

At the Old Vic New Voices US/UK Exchange launch on 23 February, Jeremy Irons read from TS Eliot’s Four Quartets .

Many thanks to Corinne Furness, who attended the launch, for this account of the event:

“Jeremy Irons was introduced at the event as representing the T S Eliot foundation (who are sponsoring the exchange) who had asked him to read some of Eliot’s work. He was clean shaven and had his trousers tucked into a pair of boots!

Before he did the reading he told a story about going to New York for the first time: He was filming on a boat on the way back from New York but it meant he had a few days in New York. He was walking down Madison Avenue and asked someone where Fifth Avenue was – the man replied ‘what do you think I am – an information bureau?’ which he thought was a brilliant line (Only Jeremy got the punch line of that wrong to start with saying ‘what do you think I am – an employment agency?’ and then joked that he was thinking ahead of himself). He then said he went into a shop and there was a man talking as he bought a cigar and all that Jeremy could think was ‘everyone here talks like they’re in a movie’ and, subsequently, that for a long time whenever he had to do an American accent he thought he sounded like he was in a movie and that there was something disingenuous about it.

He then went on to say that he’d read Eliot’s poetry before with Eliot’s widow Valerie and that he ‘must have done something right’ as they seemed to like it. He then read from the first section of Four Quartets (‘Burnt Norton’, part 3) before saying that he had to leave to go rehearse!”

According to the Old Vic New Voices twitter feed, over 400 people were in attendance at the launch.

Share