Jeremy Irons Named Chancellor of Bath Spa University

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Bath Spa University has announced that Jeremy Irons has accepted the position of Chancellor. It is the first time in its history that the University will have a Chancellor.

Photograph: Jeremy Irons

The news was announced by Vice-Chancellor of Bath Spa University, Professor Christina Slade who said:

“Creativity is at the heart of Bath Spa University. Through his vast experience in the arts Jeremy Irons will bring unique insight to Bath Spa University and influence our vision to be the leading university for creativity, culture and enterprise.

“I look forward to working closely with Mr Irons in his new role and the opportunities this new relationship will afford the University.”

Jeremy Irons has a long and illustrious career in film, television and theatre. He trained at the Old Vic Theatre School in Bristol and first performed on stage in 1969. He has appeared in numerous productions in both the West End of London and on Broadway winning a Tony Award for Best Actor for his role in The Real Thing in 1984.

His performance in TV series Brideshead Revisited resulted in his first Golden Globe Award for Best Actor and he won a further Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actor and an Emmy Award for his performance in Elizabeth I.

His numerous film credits include Kafka, Dead Ringers, Lolita, The Man in the Iron Mask, The Lion King, Die Hard with a Vengeance, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice and Reversal of Fortune for which he won the Academy Award for Best Actor.

Speaking about his appointment, Jeremy Irons said:

“I am delighted and honoured to have been elected the first Chancellor of Bath Spa University. I look forward to playing a part in the University’s growing success and international renown.

“Being a believer in the importance of integrated education I am delighted to see the education and research happening at Bath Spa moving in this direction. Having been educated at Sherborne, trained and apprenticed at the Bristol Old Vic including a run at the Theatre Royal Bath it feels right for me to accept this role.

“I hope that my international visibility will be a further aid in attracting students from both this country and overseas. I look forward to my tenure.”

The Chancellor is the ceremonial figurehead of the university and plays an important ambassadorial role for the University.

An investiture ceremony will take place in the autumn when Jeremy Irons will formally be installed as Chancellor of Bath Spa University.

Jeremy Irons Attends ‘Peter Sellers: Behind the Camera’ Exhibition

Jeremy Irons, his dog Smudge, and Sinead Cusack attended the VIP private view of the photo exhibition Peter Sellers: Behind the Camera, on 27 October, at 19 Beauchamp Place. The photos are being auctioned to benefit the British Heart Foundation. A photo of Sinead is among those on display.

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Jeremy Irons to Pay Homage to T.S. Eliot at Wilton’s Music Hall

From The London Library

The London Library announced today that Jeremy Irons, Simon Russell Beale, Fiona Shaw, and Ben Whishaw will be taking centre stage in the Library’s special celebration of T.S. Eliot on 21st October 2015.

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Taking place at Wilton’s Music Hall – one of the country’s most atmospheric theatres – the single performance promises to be a unique tribute to one of the world’s best known writers.

Philip Spedding, Development Director at The London Library said, “Jeremy Irons, Simon Russell Beale, Fiona Shaw, and Ben Whishaw are intimately associated with some of the most powerful recent performances of Eliot’s work. We are delighted that they are coming together for what promises to be a memorable tribute to a genuinely great writer”.

The evening of readings is looking to include extracts from a range of T.S. Eliot’s work including The Love Song of J. Alfred PrufrockFour QuartetsThe Waste LandThe Hollow Men and Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats.

With tickets on sale to the public, alongside an invited audience of special guests, all proceeds from the evening at Wilton’s Music Hall will go to support The London Library, a charity which is one of the world’s largest independent lending libraries and will be celebrating its 175th year in 2016.

Tickets for this special fundraising evening are £55 (£45 for London Library members). The performance will take place at 7.30pm on 21st October at Wilton’s Music Hall, 1 Graces Alley, London E1 8JB. To book, telephone Wilton’s (020 7702 2789) or visit www.wiltons.org.uk.

For further information contact: Julian Lloyd, Head of Communications, The London Library; Julian.lloyd@londonlibrary.co.uk

Jeremy Irons at Royal Ascot 2015

Jeremy Irons and Sinead Cusack attended Ladies Day at Royal Ascot in Ascot, Berkshire, on Thursday 18 June 2015.

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Jeremy Irons Attends Lots of Charity Remarkable Dinner

Jeremy Irons attended the lotsofcharity.com Remarkable Dinner at the St. Pancras Renaissance Hotel on April 29, 2015 in London, England.

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Video of Jeremy arriving at the event:

http://www.gettyimages.in/detail/video/jeremy-irons-at-lots-of-charity-event-at-st-pancras-news-footage/471846680

Jeremy Irons Attends ‘Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty’ Opening

Jeremy Irons and Sinead Cusack attend the Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty VIP private view at the Victoria and Albert Museum on March 14, 2015 in London, England.

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Jeremy Irons Attends Liberatum Gala in London

LONDON, ENGLAND – NOVEMBER 17:  Jeremy Irons attended the Liberatum Cultural Honour for Francis Ford Coppola at The Bulgari Hotel on November 17, 2014 in London, England. (Most photos by David M. Benett/Getty Images)

Read more in the Daily Mail

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Jeremy Irons to Give Masterclass for Associated Studios

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A WORKSHOP WITH THE LEGENDARY ACTOR JEREMY IRONS – Monday Evening 10th Feb 2014

We are delighted that Jeremy Irons is coming in to give a masterclass on Monday 10th February from 7pm-9.30pm at our new venue St. Alban’s Fulham.

Address:
St. Alban’s Fulham
2 Margravine Road
London W6 8HJ
Tube: Baron’s Court

What to prepare:

There are places available for 4 participants, two men and two women who need to read/learn the first scene from Harold Pinter’s Betrayal. This will be followed by a Q&A.

Please note that it can be nerve racking to work on ones skills in front of an audience. Last time we had Jeremy in a few of the participating actors did get excellent opportunities as a result of the workshop, however one or two did feel very nervous and vulnerable in the presence of an audience. Most of our workshops have no audience, however there is so much to learn from this it is an opportunity not to be missed. If you want to participate be prepared to fail before succeeding and come with an attitude of working publicly, rather than performing publicly.

1977
Scene One: Pub. 1977. Spring.
Emma and Jerry meet for the first time in two years. For 7 years they had an affair and a secret flat, and Jerry says no-one else knew. Now Emma is having an affair with Casey, an author whose agent is Jerry and whose publisher is Robert, Emma’s husband. Emma says she found out last night that Robert has betrayed her with other women for years, and admits she revealed her affair with Jerry.
In 1977 Emma is 38, Jerry and Robert are 40. I think this scene is just a two-hander.

Cost:
Participants: £50 (4 places)
Observers £10

To apply please e-mail info@associatedstudios.co.uk with a CV and a photo

Jeremy Irons in Paul McCartney’s ‘Queenie Eye’ Video

Jeremy Irons makes an appearance in Paul McCartney’s video for ‘Queenie Eye’ a song from McCartney’s 2013 album NEW.

Here’s the video which premiered on VEVO on 24 October 2013:

Here’s a behind-the-scenes video about the filming of ‘Queenie Eye’:

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Max Irons in DuJour Magazine

Max Irons is featured in the August 2013 issue of DuJour Magazine.

Culture
Irons In The Fire

With The White Queen, Max Irons emerges as the clear successor to an acting dynasty

By Adam Rathe
Photographed by Annelise Howard Phillips
Styled by Paul Frederick

SOURCE

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Strange things happen when Max Irons sleeps.

“I’ve been having the most vivid dreams, involving all real people, really clear and believable dreams,” the 27-year-old actor says, staring intently to make it clear he’s serious. “Some nice, some not.”

Blame melatonin for what’s going on at night with the jet-lagged actor, who’s on a jaunt to New York from his home in London. His other dreams, however, the ones that are coming true, can only be attributed to hard work—and more than a pinch of good luck.

In August, the period dramaThe White Queen (adapted from the Philippa Gregory novel) will debut on Starz, beaming Irons’ fetching mug into millions of homes. Following that is an Antonio Vivaldi biopic with Irons as the Italian composer, and Posh, a look at an Oxford secret society, from An Education director Lone Scherfig. Indeed, Irons seems poised to become that most dreamed-about thing: a serious, successful actor.

“It wasn’t a calculated step,” Irons, who starred in Twilight creator Stephanie Meyer’s The Host earlier this year, says. “I was recently up for a large part in a franchise, a very well-established franchise, and I said, ‘I can’t do it.’ No matter how you spin it to me, it was a version of the two parts I played before [in Red Riding Hood and The Host]. I’m very grateful these films got my foot in the door, but if I do it again, I’ll want to quit acting.”

Enter Edward IV, the first king of England to come from the House of York. “When this came along, it felt like a different direction,” Irons says of his role in The White Queen. “It was this really fascinating piece of English history. And there’s development of the character: You meet when he’s 22 and young and powerful and you see him—I don’t mean to spoil anything—on his deathbed. It felt like something I could get my teeth into.”

It certainly is. During the series’ first season, Irons’ Edward—who, like the actor, was known for his height and good looks—progresses from the tenderfoot monarch whose reign, beginning in 1461, was bloodied by the War of the Roses to a seasoned king presiding over a peaceful land until his untimely death at the age of 41. Along the way, the series’ titular regent, who is Edward’s wife (played by Swedish stunner Rebecca Ferguson), complicates matters as a powerbroker in her own right.

To untangle the story’s knotty web of ancient aristocrats, Irons had his work cut out for him. “There is, relatively speaking, not much information on this particular king,” Irons says. “I had to go into a bookshop and track down his journey. What I love to research is what everyone was up to. You know it was very conniving, backstabbing way of life. People were constantly after you, so consequently you’ve got to know what everyone in the room was up to.”

That feeling probably isn’t too unfamiliar to Irons, who, as the son of actors Jeremy Irons and Sinead Cusack, has grown up in the public eye. Irons says while he can ride the Tube and go where he likes virtually undetected, it still isn’t easy following in the footsteps of prominent parents. “I became an actor at 17, and whether or not I like to acknowledge it on a conscious level, my parents are very successful actors—there is no way around it, ” he says. “Which is difficult for a son because you want to impress your family and I’ve realized I never truly will. I’ll never amaze them.”

Although stardom might be old hat for his family, Irons is still wide-eyed enough to appreciate the experience. “I have to do it for me, I have to amaze myself,” he says. “I’m on sets surrounded by people on horses, people in armor and they’re all following me because I’m the king. This is an amazing moment; I’m not letting this moment drift by and then trying to amaze someone later by reporting back. I’m living life, I’m living the life I’ve created.”

Indeed, the decisions that Irons is making now will shape what he hopes will be a decades-long career. And if Edward IV can teach him anything, it must just be how to survive life as a movie star.

“He was cheeky and charming and dangerous,” Irons says of the young king, “but he could get away with it.”