‘Their Finest’ to Premiere at TIFF 2016

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“…Jeremy Irons turns up for a delicious cameo…”

Their Finest will have its World Premiere at the 2016 Toronto International Film Festival.

It will screen on Sunday, September 11, at Roy Thomson Hall at 3:30pm. (Gala Presentation)

Additional screenings include:

Monday, September 12th at The Princess of Wales Theatre at 3:00pm

Tuesday. September 13th at Sciotabank Theatre Cinema 01 at 9:30am (Press & Industry)

Wednesday, September 14h at Sciotabank Theatre Cinema 02 at 9:45am (Press & Industry)

Saturday, September 17th at the Visa Screening Room at the Elgin Theatre at 11:45am

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Danish filmmaker Lone Scherfig (An Education, The Riot Club) directs a sterling British cast — including Gemma Arterton, Bill Nighy, Jack Huston and Richard E. Grant — in this period comedy-drama about a group of filmmakers struggling to make an inspirational film to boost morale during the Blitz of London in World War II.

Director Lone Scherfig (An Education) returns to the Festival with this rousing romantic comedy set in Britain’s wartime film industry. Featuring a cast teeming with some of the UK’s most charismatic comedic actors, Bill Nighy and Richard E. Grant among them, Their Finest is about boosting morale in a period of national — and personal — crisis.

Catrin Cole (Gemma Arterton, who also appears at the Festival in Orphan and The Girl With All the Gifts) is a “slop” scriptwriter, charged with bringing a female perspective to war films produced by the British Ministry of Information’s Film Division. Her current project is a feature inspired by stories of British civilians rescuing soldiers after the retreat at Dunkirk. Catrin’s artist husband looks down on her job, despite the fact that it’s paying the rent. At least lead scenarist Tom Buckley (Sam Claflin) appreciates her efforts.

While on location in Devon, Catrin begins to come into her own and earn the respect of her peers. She’s the only crewperson that Ambrose Hilliard (Nighy), a past-his-prime yet nonetheless pompous actor, will talk to.

Based on the novel Their Finest Hour and a Half by Lissa Evans, the film pops with witty banter and flows with lovely period detail. The characters are uniformly textured and the performances nuanced. Nighy is perfectly cast in his endearingly withering role, and Jeremy Irons turns up for a delicious cameo. It is, however, Arterton’s show. She brings subtlety, intelligence, and a range of beautifully gauged emotions to Catrin, whose path to self-renewal is an inspiring example of a talented woman forging her place in the world.

Jeremy Irons Stars in ‘Their Finest’

Jeremy Irons has a small role, as the Secretary of War, in the film Their Finest, directed by Lone Scherfig. The film is based on the 2009 novel Their Finest Hour and a Half by Lissa Evans.

The film will have a Gala Presentation at the 2016 Toronto International Film Festival.

TIFF runs from 8th to 18th September. The exact dates, times and locations of the Gala Presentations will be released on 23rd August.

[No confirmation yet on whether Jeremy will be in attendance at TIFF this year.]

Jeremy filmed his role in Their Finest, at the end of September 2015, in Wales.

Read more about the film on IMDb

Read more at the TIFF website.

Their-Finest-Hour-And-A-HalfScreen Shot 2016-08-17 at 11.02.46 PMtheirfinest1

Max Irons in The Times – Wednesday 10 September 2014

Max Irons was interviewed by The Times (London) for an article in the Times 2 supplement on Wednesday 10 September 2014.

Click on the photos below to enlarge them and read the article text:

Max in The Times Wednesday 10 September 2014 Part 1 Max in The Times Wednesday 10 September 2014 Part 2

 

 

Max Irons at TIFF 2014

Max Irons and some of the cast of The Riot Club, including Sam Claflin, Douglas Booth and Holliday Grainger, were at the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival on 6 September, for the Red Carpet Gala Premiere of the film. The cast walked the red carpet, spoke to the press, signed a few autographs and posed for photos and then were introduced before the film screening at Roy Thomson Hall.

[All photos by www.jeremyirons.net]

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Getty Images links to more photos:

The Riot Club” Premiere – Arrivals – 2014 Toronto International Film Festival

The Riot Club” Premiere – Red Carpet – 2014 Toronto International Film Festival

Variety Studio Presented By Moroccanoil At Holt Renfrew – Day 2 – 2014 Toronto International Film Festival

2014 Toronto International Film Festival Portraits

The Riot Club” Premiere – Arrivals – 2014 Toronto International Film Festival

Post Premiere Party for “The Riot Club” Sponsored By Hugo Boss And GQ

2014 Toronto International Film Festival Portraits – Day 4

2014 Toronto International Film Festival – Guess Portrait Studio – Day 4

Max Irons in ‘The Sunday Times’

Max Irons is interviewed in The Sunday Times Culture section for 31 August 2014.

Click on the images to view them full sized and read the text of the article.

Max Sunday Times 1 Max Sunday Times 2

Max Irons in DuJour Magazine

Max Irons is featured in the August 2013 issue of DuJour Magazine.

Culture
Irons In The Fire

With The White Queen, Max Irons emerges as the clear successor to an acting dynasty

By Adam Rathe
Photographed by Annelise Howard Phillips
Styled by Paul Frederick

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Strange things happen when Max Irons sleeps.

“I’ve been having the most vivid dreams, involving all real people, really clear and believable dreams,” the 27-year-old actor says, staring intently to make it clear he’s serious. “Some nice, some not.”

Blame melatonin for what’s going on at night with the jet-lagged actor, who’s on a jaunt to New York from his home in London. His other dreams, however, the ones that are coming true, can only be attributed to hard work—and more than a pinch of good luck.

In August, the period dramaThe White Queen (adapted from the Philippa Gregory novel) will debut on Starz, beaming Irons’ fetching mug into millions of homes. Following that is an Antonio Vivaldi biopic with Irons as the Italian composer, and Posh, a look at an Oxford secret society, from An Education director Lone Scherfig. Indeed, Irons seems poised to become that most dreamed-about thing: a serious, successful actor.

“It wasn’t a calculated step,” Irons, who starred in Twilight creator Stephanie Meyer’s The Host earlier this year, says. “I was recently up for a large part in a franchise, a very well-established franchise, and I said, ‘I can’t do it.’ No matter how you spin it to me, it was a version of the two parts I played before [in Red Riding Hood and The Host]. I’m very grateful these films got my foot in the door, but if I do it again, I’ll want to quit acting.”

Enter Edward IV, the first king of England to come from the House of York. “When this came along, it felt like a different direction,” Irons says of his role in The White Queen. “It was this really fascinating piece of English history. And there’s development of the character: You meet when he’s 22 and young and powerful and you see him—I don’t mean to spoil anything—on his deathbed. It felt like something I could get my teeth into.”

It certainly is. During the series’ first season, Irons’ Edward—who, like the actor, was known for his height and good looks—progresses from the tenderfoot monarch whose reign, beginning in 1461, was bloodied by the War of the Roses to a seasoned king presiding over a peaceful land until his untimely death at the age of 41. Along the way, the series’ titular regent, who is Edward’s wife (played by Swedish stunner Rebecca Ferguson), complicates matters as a powerbroker in her own right.

To untangle the story’s knotty web of ancient aristocrats, Irons had his work cut out for him. “There is, relatively speaking, not much information on this particular king,” Irons says. “I had to go into a bookshop and track down his journey. What I love to research is what everyone was up to. You know it was very conniving, backstabbing way of life. People were constantly after you, so consequently you’ve got to know what everyone in the room was up to.”

That feeling probably isn’t too unfamiliar to Irons, who, as the son of actors Jeremy Irons and Sinead Cusack, has grown up in the public eye. Irons says while he can ride the Tube and go where he likes virtually undetected, it still isn’t easy following in the footsteps of prominent parents. “I became an actor at 17, and whether or not I like to acknowledge it on a conscious level, my parents are very successful actors—there is no way around it, ” he says. “Which is difficult for a son because you want to impress your family and I’ve realized I never truly will. I’ll never amaze them.”

Although stardom might be old hat for his family, Irons is still wide-eyed enough to appreciate the experience. “I have to do it for me, I have to amaze myself,” he says. “I’m on sets surrounded by people on horses, people in armor and they’re all following me because I’m the king. This is an amazing moment; I’m not letting this moment drift by and then trying to amaze someone later by reporting back. I’m living life, I’m living the life I’ve created.”

Indeed, the decisions that Irons is making now will shape what he hopes will be a decades-long career. And if Edward IV can teach him anything, it must just be how to survive life as a movie star.

“He was cheeky and charming and dangerous,” Irons says of the young king, “but he could get away with it.”