Home Is Anywhere Jeremy Irons Drapes His Scarf – New York Times

Home Is Anywhere Jeremy Irons Drapes His Scarf

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Jeremy Irons at his suite in the Lowell Hotel in New York. The actor is on tour to promote his latest movie, “The Man Who Knew Infinity.” Credit An Rong Xu for The New York Times

Jeremy Irons owns a pied-à-terre in London, a house in Oxfordshire and a 15th-century castle in Cork, Ireland, painted a color that complaining neighbors have called pink.

“They got their knickers in a twist about it, but it’s not pink,” Mr. Irons said during a recent stay in New York. “It’s the color of fresh seaweed, and it blends with the sea that surrounds it.”

To judge by his woebegone look, Mr. Irons hasn’t spent much time on that property in the last year. A hectic schedule of movie work and promotion has taken him all over the world, and he was to decamp the next morning for Washington, to preside over a screening at the White House of his latest film, “The Man Who Knew Infinity.”

Considering all the travel on behalf of the movie, in which he plays the Cambridge math professor G. H. Hardy, Mr. Irons ought to have felt uprooted. Not a chance, he said. The actor, 68, makes it his business, his passion, really, to trick out the hotel suite or rented house assigned to him with all the comforts of a caravan. Home, he will tell you, is wherever he happens to be.

“I used to travel with a lot of scarves, which I bought in Hong Kong, Chinese scarves,” he said. “They were wonderfully embroidered. And I’d just drape them over everything.”

His cyclone publicity tour, undertaken in part with Oscar gold in mind, has forced him to pack lightly. At the Lowell Hotel on the Upper East Side, where he talked over bourbon (Eagle Rare) and licorice-flavored cigarettes, he easily made do with the imitation heritage furnishings: damask-covered chairs, cushy divans and a cherry wood desk. Mr. Irons, who seemed to be roughing it in a weathered coat and Spanish boots, looked stately enough, if a little out of place.

So did the guitar propped at the foot of a chair. And Smudge, Mr. Irons’s affable Jack Russell/bichon frisé, who goes wherever Mr. Irons goes. No coy mistress, Smudge sprang from her bed when called into the room to pose for a photograph.

“Sorry, Smudge, sorry for this indignity,” Mr. Irons said. “Chin up; that’s good. Try and look at the gallery. Keep your head up — like that!”

A director manqué, and something of an aesthete, he traded antiques as a youth to put himself through drama school. He still has a mystical attachment to inanimate objects, among them an aged barrel chair he once picked up in Bristol — a commode, in fact, that he covered with a fancy cushion. There is also a prize BMW motorcycle he rides at home, even to rehearsals.

“I talk to it,” he said. “I have to apologize to it when I’ve been away or riding someone else’s bike.”

His spiritual proclivities date from his boyhood on the Isle of Wight, where his father was an accountant. Mr. Irons, a Catholic, believed — still does, in fact — in the power of good works. He once helped run a parish in South London, visiting sick and elderly parishioners, playing the church organ and running the youth club.

There were heady distractions. On evenings off, Mr. Irons cycled to the West End, guitar strapped to his back. “Every now and again, some little bird perched near the street would start talking to you,” he said. His troubadour look was, he discovered, “a wonderful way to attract girls.” Up until then, he recalled, “Girls lived in a dream world in my head.”

At his all-male public school, Mr. Irons played in a rock group called the Four Pillars of Wisdom. The bass player had some success with the female fans, Mr. Irons recalled, gazing fixedly at the carpet. “I, on the other hand, hadn’t even talked to a girl,” he said. “I had no skills at all in that area.”

It’s hard to fathom, given that Mr. Irons has seemingly never let his near-40-year marriage to the Irish actress Sinead Cusack undercut his reputation as a rake, one who has been linked in the tabloids with more than a few leading ladies. But it was an apparently chastened Mr. Irons who told a reporter this year that straying is not good for one’s mental health.

Sure, he enjoys a few vices: “I don’t like rules, and break as many as I can,” he said. “To me, it’s an exciting way to run one’s life.”

As a boy, he once thought of joining the circus. “I wandered round one night to the back of the tents and discovered that most of the circus workers appeared to sleep in booths, sort of four berths to a booth,” he said. “I thought, ‘I’m too middle class for this.’”

The theater seemed a luxury by contrast. “I loved the fact that we could get up at 10 o’clock and we went to bed at 2, so we were out of sync with everybody else,” he said. “I loved the smells, I loved the attitude, I loved the fact that some of my colleagues were quite insecure as people, which made them quite open.”

The bohemian life suits him. He clearly relates to the long-ago time when actors “didn’t have the vote and we could be imprisoned easily. We were disreputable,” he went on, seeming to relish the notion. “We were vagabonds and rogues.”

The rogue in him waxed skeptical about the state of American politics. “I watched all of the debates, and I was enormously depressed,” he said. After criticizing the president-elect, he intercepted a look from his longtime publicist, Sally Fisher, who sat vigilant on a sofa nearby. “She doesn’t want me to talk politics,” he said.

He may like talking issues, but not his inner workings. “I remember going for some therapy a long time ago,” he said. “The therapist, she’d keep asking these questions. I thought: ‘That’s none of your business. I don’t want you tell you that.’ And after about two seconds, she said, ‘I don’t think you’re ready for this.’”

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Jeremy Irons and the Music of Ales Velas

ACTOR JEREMY IRONS ENJOYING THE MUSIC OF ALES VELAS IN NEW YORK

Actor/director Jeremy Irons remembers being in Lima, Perú, about thirty years ago. Though this is his first encounter with some Peruvian repertoire.

This was filmed in Bear Mountain State Park in Peekskill, NY on Tuesday 30 July 2013.

After recording what is to be part of a PBS series about motorcycle routes in the U.S. Golden Globe & Academy Award winner (best actor) Jeremy Irons joins Pasache Music to talk about his visit to Perú about thirty years ago and producer Oscar Pasache decided to improvise and sing Volvamos A Ser Novios (Félix Pasache) as a way to proudly share one of his father’s masterpieces, part of a rich Peruvian repertoire of waltzes.

https://www.facebook.com/video/embed?video_id=10153094508435187

Jeremy Irons BMW Motorrad Hungary Technical Session

Jeremy Irons participated in rider training technical sessions with BMW Motorrad in Hungary. Jeremy completed the basic level of the BMW Motorrad Rider Training course at Kiskunlacháza Airport in Hungary.

Check out this great video:

Jeremy Irons Attends TRIC Awards

Jeremy Irons and his wife, Sinead Cusack, were in attendance for the TRIC (Television and Radio Industries Club) Awards on Tuesday 12 March 2013, at the at Grosvenor House on Park Lane, London.

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Jeremy Irons in ‘Cigar Aficionado’ Magazine

Jeremy Irons is featured in the March/April 2013 issue of Cigar Aficionado magazine.

This magazine is a must own for any Jeremy Irons fan. Be sure to buy a copy at your local news stand, book seller or cigar store.

Here are scans and photographs of the magazine. Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the images and read the text.

All images © Cigar Aficionado Magazine [Text by Marshall Fine – Portraits by Jim Wright] No copyright infringement intended.

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Jeremy Irons in Transylvania

Jeremy Irons was recently in Transylvania. An art group from Tatabanya (Hungarian city), whose photographers met him in Transylvania, captured him enjoying some local cuisine and beverage.

Jeremy Irons in Motorrevü Online – Interview and Photos

Interview – Motorrevü Hungary – Jeremy Irons

2012-09-20, Written by: Ivan Zomborácz, Catherine Burner , Pictures: Peter Kőhalmi
Source

Gallery at the bottom of this post. Click on the photos for full size.

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Translated from Hungarian

Though being an Oscar-winning actor, he arrived without bodyguards, only his make-up artist was sitting behind him in the saddle. He wore simple canvas pants, leather boots and a shirt ripped at his elbow. For someone with such a strong presence, he doesn’t need a fuss around him – as he arrived, the air thickened around him, Mr. Irons has a presence of weight. Although it was the first time we’d first met, he greeted me as an old friend.

MR: You have not started riding too early. What made you start riding at 30?

Mr. Irons: I think I started to be interested in motorbikes because of my brother. He had a BSA He advised me not to sit on the motorbike until I had driven a car for at least 10 years. You need this amount of time to learn how other drivers behave, one of whom may be your murderer one day. You need to get used to how to get around in the safety of four wheels. I took my brother’s advice, so I committed my first mistakes driving a car. By the time I was 30, I knew that I was not invincible, that I could die. It is missing from young people.

MR: Almost at the same time that you started to ride, you settled your family life, and started up your acting career. What happened to you at age 30, that brought about so many changes in your life? Do you see a relationship between these?

I: I think it’s just a coincidence. If someone learns to be an actor, he spends his twenties with learning the profession and starts building his career. By the time he crosses 30, he’s picked up a lot of knowledge and begun to attract attention. So the really interesting things start happening for people in their 30s and 40s when they are still full of ambition and energy. At that time I lived in London, and was driving a little Honda 50. But it was enough for me. I remember once we went on a Christmas shopping trip, behind me my wife and our newborn baby, and our dog, and all the presents we bought. We looked like the Chinese. I was once in China, and I saw how they drive the motorbike there. Ladder, and anything that you can pack up on their bikes. So, there I was in London and I looked like them.

MR: When did you feel like leaving the Chinese feeling behind and move up a category?

I: When I passed 40, I stopped for a few years, until I moved to the countryside and reminded myself that I always ​​promised myself a bigger bike. So I bought my first BMW, second hand. It was a RT100’s, which I really loved. I remember when I bought it, I did not even know how to start it at first. In addition, I wanted to go to London that evening to pick up a friend for dinner and watch a movie. So I called her and told her to wear pants because I would be with a bike. But when I got there, she appeared in a long black skirt that was cut up high at one side and left her entire left leg free as she sat up on the motor. I thought immediately that it was worth it.

MR: Have you stuck to BMW?

I: I loved the RT100. When I heard that they would stop the complete production and adjust to a new model, a boxer engine, I bought one of the last RTs on the market. I use it to this day. Unfortunately, in the last 22 years I only put 87 thousand miles on it. I like it because it is so reliable, and because … it is not a computer. It’s so simple. If there is a problem, there’s a good chance it is the carburetor that I can adjust. Of course, it has no ABS, but I have never had a need of it. I evaluate the road on the basis of the abilities of the machine. Its wheels are a bit narrow, but still I love it.

MR: You have been in Hungary many times, you did hiking too. Do you have a favourite motorcycle route? And what would you recommend for the Hungarian bikers in Europe, that they shouldn’t miss?

I: Unfortunately, due to my work, I do not have much time to hike. But there is a section in the mountains, at the old capital city, Esztergom. I love that route. But I know there are a lot of good routes here. Once I headed east, but I found that area too flat. I could not yet get to the south. I know that there are a lot of good routes in Hungary, but you should not ask my advice. I love Slovenia. There are beautiful roads there, once I went down to the sea on little serpentine.

MR: Do you prefer travelling alone or with a passenger?

I: With a passenger, because I think the most interesting part of the ride, when you stop, talk, relax and explore. It is just the opposite of when you only drive and concentrate and go on. Of course, that also has its own beauty, but then you stop at one point. To smoke a cigarette, drink a cup of coffee while browsing around. And it’s very good to have someone there with you, with whom you can share the experience.

MR: What do you think of the Hungarian transport morals?

I: When driving in town, you musn’t forget that people can be tired, crapulent, or nervous because they are late, or they are simply old, and it can have thousands of other reasons why they may not notice the rider. Then the madness of young people on their scooters! However, I do not think that Hungary is more dangerous than any other country in the world. Every country has its own particularities. In Italy, for example, everyone is driving fast, but exactly for this reason, they concentrate more, even if they drive on the other side of the road sometimes. You can’t do anything about it, you need to get used to it. Budapest is not more dangerous than anywhere else, where you need to pay attention to a lot of people. For example, at each overtaking I try to see where comes an intersection, where one could suddenly turn on you without signalling.

MR: Is the Guggenheim motorcycle club still operating whom you are a founding member of?

I: It’s having a rest now, but we’d like to organize a trip in the memory of Dennis Hopper. Organizing is a problem though, since I have been very busy in the last 18 months. So, it’s on ice now. Where was the last tour? Spain, perhaps, 1.5 years ago, when the rest of them toured the Basque Country. Unfortunately, I could not be with them. So the heart of the club is still beating. Gently.

MR: When it comes to motorcycle clubs, what do you think of the classic motorcycle clubs? Do you attend some?

I: I do not like motor clubs. I mean, for me, riding is about to get a break from people. You may take your loved ones or a very small team with you, but big companies are not for me. There are enough people in my life, I do not like to ride with more than two or three, because with them you can still disappear. I do not like noisily letting the world know, I’m here.

MR: In 1995, your license was withdrawn for fast driving. Does speed still attract you?

I: I like to go fast, as fast as is safely possible. This is variable. I’m trying to remember also, where the cameras are and trying to drive safely. I believe that it is much safer to go a pace that is allowed by the motorcycle and the road, than to balance at the edge of the speed limit all the time. So much easier to concentrate and enjoy the journey, which is the point of the whole thing. You can’t feel this in a car. You have to concentrate on a motor, see where the rocks are, and the water flows, and what the road and other drivers let you do. Personally, I’m trying to slow down when I see a camera. And I do not compete. Some people go nuts, when they see that someone gain on them. There are many sides to this, but I think I am a careful and conscientious driver. But fast, too.

MR: One of your sons is following your path in acting, have you infected either of them with motorcycling?

I: No. I gave them the same advice that I got back then. Wait with the motor until you had driven a car for at least 10 years. My older son has been driving since he was 18, so he could even change now. It would make sense, too, since he lives in London. Interestingly, my younger son is not interested at all in riding. He drives, too, but only got the driver’s license at the age of 24 in America. He’s simply not attracted to the idea. Although when he was little, he drove a quad on our farm, he jumped with that everywhere. As I would not advise anyone to be an actor, I would not say to buy a motorcycle. Or buy, but be aware of the dangers. Because there are. Though nothing more than in the case of horse riding (which I also like very much). But the motor riding, just like horse riding and anything else that is exciting, carries potential risks. Therefore, be sure you are very good at them. So, you have to be careful with such an advice. One day the sign will come anyway that you are ready and you can go and buy your bike and start up on the thing.

MR: You live in a medieval castle that you restored. Do old engines attract you in the same way as old buildings?

I: I like looking at them. I really liked the exhibition that was organized by the Guggenheim Museum, but I’m not obsessed with technology. I think I like motorbikes, because they give me freedom. I am interested how reliable they are, how well they work, how nice they look, but I am not crazy obsessed with them. What I enjoy in bikes is what they do to my life.