Jeremy Irons to Attend ‘Trashed’ Preview Screening at 92Y for thoughtgallery.org

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Jeremy Irons – Trashed Preview Screening

Jeremy Irons - Trashed Preview Screening

Date/Time
12/11/2012 – 7:15 PM
From $38

Location
92nd Street Y, 1395 Lexington Ave.
212-415-5500
Official site/reserve tickets

The Oscar-winning star of such films as Reversal of FortuneThe French Lieutenant’s WomanThe MissionLolitaDead Ringers and the TV series “The Borgias,” Jeremy Irons is also a producer, director, and activist. He will join Reel Pieces moderator Annette Insdorf for an onstage discussion after a selection of clips from his movies and a preview of Trashed, which premiered at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival and will be released Dec. 14 in New York.

Irons is the executive producer of this powerful documentary, a wake-up call about global waste. Irons investigates and reveals the extensive pollution of land, water and air around the globe-a threat to the food chain and to future generations. While Irons is outraged, the film also features images of paradoxical beauty as well as a score by the renowned composer Vangelis.

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Reel Pieces – Jeremy Irons, with a Preview of “Trashed” (Candida Brady, Director, 2012, 97 minutes)

The Oscar-winning star of such films as Reversal of Fortune, The French Lieutenant’s Woman, The Mission, Lolita, Dead Ringers and the TV series The Borgias,  Jeremy Irons is also a producer, director and activist.

Jeremy Irons in Motorrevü Online – Interview and Photos

Interview – Motorrevü Hungary – Jeremy Irons

2012-09-20, Written by: Ivan Zomborácz, Catherine Burner , Pictures: Peter Kőhalmi
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Gallery at the bottom of this post. Click on the photos for full size.

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Translated from Hungarian

Though being an Oscar-winning actor, he arrived without bodyguards, only his make-up artist was sitting behind him in the saddle. He wore simple canvas pants, leather boots and a shirt ripped at his elbow. For someone with such a strong presence, he doesn’t need a fuss around him – as he arrived, the air thickened around him, Mr. Irons has a presence of weight. Although it was the first time we’d first met, he greeted me as an old friend.

MR: You have not started riding too early. What made you start riding at 30?

Mr. Irons: I think I started to be interested in motorbikes because of my brother. He had a BSA He advised me not to sit on the motorbike until I had driven a car for at least 10 years. You need this amount of time to learn how other drivers behave, one of whom may be your murderer one day. You need to get used to how to get around in the safety of four wheels. I took my brother’s advice, so I committed my first mistakes driving a car. By the time I was 30, I knew that I was not invincible, that I could die. It is missing from young people.

MR: Almost at the same time that you started to ride, you settled your family life, and started up your acting career. What happened to you at age 30, that brought about so many changes in your life? Do you see a relationship between these?

I: I think it’s just a coincidence. If someone learns to be an actor, he spends his twenties with learning the profession and starts building his career. By the time he crosses 30, he’s picked up a lot of knowledge and begun to attract attention. So the really interesting things start happening for people in their 30s and 40s when they are still full of ambition and energy. At that time I lived in London, and was driving a little Honda 50. But it was enough for me. I remember once we went on a Christmas shopping trip, behind me my wife and our newborn baby, and our dog, and all the presents we bought. We looked like the Chinese. I was once in China, and I saw how they drive the motorbike there. Ladder, and anything that you can pack up on their bikes. So, there I was in London and I looked like them.

MR: When did you feel like leaving the Chinese feeling behind and move up a category?

I: When I passed 40, I stopped for a few years, until I moved to the countryside and reminded myself that I always ​​promised myself a bigger bike. So I bought my first BMW, second hand. It was a RT100’s, which I really loved. I remember when I bought it, I did not even know how to start it at first. In addition, I wanted to go to London that evening to pick up a friend for dinner and watch a movie. So I called her and told her to wear pants because I would be with a bike. But when I got there, she appeared in a long black skirt that was cut up high at one side and left her entire left leg free as she sat up on the motor. I thought immediately that it was worth it.

MR: Have you stuck to BMW?

I: I loved the RT100. When I heard that they would stop the complete production and adjust to a new model, a boxer engine, I bought one of the last RTs on the market. I use it to this day. Unfortunately, in the last 22 years I only put 87 thousand miles on it. I like it because it is so reliable, and because … it is not a computer. It’s so simple. If there is a problem, there’s a good chance it is the carburetor that I can adjust. Of course, it has no ABS, but I have never had a need of it. I evaluate the road on the basis of the abilities of the machine. Its wheels are a bit narrow, but still I love it.

MR: You have been in Hungary many times, you did hiking too. Do you have a favourite motorcycle route? And what would you recommend for the Hungarian bikers in Europe, that they shouldn’t miss?

I: Unfortunately, due to my work, I do not have much time to hike. But there is a section in the mountains, at the old capital city, Esztergom. I love that route. But I know there are a lot of good routes here. Once I headed east, but I found that area too flat. I could not yet get to the south. I know that there are a lot of good routes in Hungary, but you should not ask my advice. I love Slovenia. There are beautiful roads there, once I went down to the sea on little serpentine.

MR: Do you prefer travelling alone or with a passenger?

I: With a passenger, because I think the most interesting part of the ride, when you stop, talk, relax and explore. It is just the opposite of when you only drive and concentrate and go on. Of course, that also has its own beauty, but then you stop at one point. To smoke a cigarette, drink a cup of coffee while browsing around. And it’s very good to have someone there with you, with whom you can share the experience.

MR: What do you think of the Hungarian transport morals?

I: When driving in town, you musn’t forget that people can be tired, crapulent, or nervous because they are late, or they are simply old, and it can have thousands of other reasons why they may not notice the rider. Then the madness of young people on their scooters! However, I do not think that Hungary is more dangerous than any other country in the world. Every country has its own particularities. In Italy, for example, everyone is driving fast, but exactly for this reason, they concentrate more, even if they drive on the other side of the road sometimes. You can’t do anything about it, you need to get used to it. Budapest is not more dangerous than anywhere else, where you need to pay attention to a lot of people. For example, at each overtaking I try to see where comes an intersection, where one could suddenly turn on you without signalling.

MR: Is the Guggenheim motorcycle club still operating whom you are a founding member of?

I: It’s having a rest now, but we’d like to organize a trip in the memory of Dennis Hopper. Organizing is a problem though, since I have been very busy in the last 18 months. So, it’s on ice now. Where was the last tour? Spain, perhaps, 1.5 years ago, when the rest of them toured the Basque Country. Unfortunately, I could not be with them. So the heart of the club is still beating. Gently.

MR: When it comes to motorcycle clubs, what do you think of the classic motorcycle clubs? Do you attend some?

I: I do not like motor clubs. I mean, for me, riding is about to get a break from people. You may take your loved ones or a very small team with you, but big companies are not for me. There are enough people in my life, I do not like to ride with more than two or three, because with them you can still disappear. I do not like noisily letting the world know, I’m here.

MR: In 1995, your license was withdrawn for fast driving. Does speed still attract you?

I: I like to go fast, as fast as is safely possible. This is variable. I’m trying to remember also, where the cameras are and trying to drive safely. I believe that it is much safer to go a pace that is allowed by the motorcycle and the road, than to balance at the edge of the speed limit all the time. So much easier to concentrate and enjoy the journey, which is the point of the whole thing. You can’t feel this in a car. You have to concentrate on a motor, see where the rocks are, and the water flows, and what the road and other drivers let you do. Personally, I’m trying to slow down when I see a camera. And I do not compete. Some people go nuts, when they see that someone gain on them. There are many sides to this, but I think I am a careful and conscientious driver. But fast, too.

MR: One of your sons is following your path in acting, have you infected either of them with motorcycling?

I: No. I gave them the same advice that I got back then. Wait with the motor until you had driven a car for at least 10 years. My older son has been driving since he was 18, so he could even change now. It would make sense, too, since he lives in London. Interestingly, my younger son is not interested at all in riding. He drives, too, but only got the driver’s license at the age of 24 in America. He’s simply not attracted to the idea. Although when he was little, he drove a quad on our farm, he jumped with that everywhere. As I would not advise anyone to be an actor, I would not say to buy a motorcycle. Or buy, but be aware of the dangers. Because there are. Though nothing more than in the case of horse riding (which I also like very much). But the motor riding, just like horse riding and anything else that is exciting, carries potential risks. Therefore, be sure you are very good at them. So, you have to be careful with such an advice. One day the sign will come anyway that you are ready and you can go and buy your bike and start up on the thing.

MR: You live in a medieval castle that you restored. Do old engines attract you in the same way as old buildings?

I: I like looking at them. I really liked the exhibition that was organized by the Guggenheim Museum, but I’m not obsessed with technology. I think I like motorbikes, because they give me freedom. I am interested how reliable they are, how well they work, how nice they look, but I am not crazy obsessed with them. What I enjoy in bikes is what they do to my life.

Jeremy Irons in Vogue Magazine – September 2012

Jeremy Irons is featured in the September 2012 issue of Vogue.

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Jeremy Irons at 2012 Sarajevo Film Festival

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Some photos via @chrisdz and @vjosab on Twitter, @neshill and @m_juric on Instagram, Nikolina Vicelic ‏@NikolinaVicelic on Twitter, and Ranko Vucinic ‏@rankovucinic on Twitter and Sinisa Sunara / Cropix .

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Jeremy Irons Guest of the Sarajevo Film Festival

With a great pleasure the Sarajevo Film Festival announces arrival of one of the greatest actors of today, the Oscar winner, Jeremy Irons.

Jeremy Irons returns to Sarajevo in capacity of the curator of Katrin Cartlidge Foundation, which will award one young artist this year again.

Sarajevo audience had a chance to greet this big friend of the Sarajevo Film Festival, the actor with a fascinating international career, during the Sarajevo Film Festival in 2007 when he presided the Grand Jury of the 13th Sarajevo Film Festival’s Competition Programme.

British actor realized his roles in around seventy films, among which only some to single out, “Waterland”, “The Man in the Iron Mask”, “M. Butterfly”, “The Mission”, “Reversal of Fortune” for which he won Oscar and Golden Globe for the Best Actor in the Leading Role.

On the occasion of Jeremy Irons’ arrival to Sarajevo, on Saturday a special screening of the film TRASHED, directed by Candida Brady will take place in the Meeting Point Cinema, starting at 2.30 p.m. After the screening, a Q&A with the special guest, Jeremy Irons, will take place.
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Jeremy was also in Dubrovnik and attended a press conference there.

Oscar Winning ‘Die Hard’ Actor – ‘Trashed’ in Bishop’s Cleeve

From This Is Gloucestershire

Oscar winning Die Hard actor – Trashed in Bishop’s Cleeve

Saturday, May 26, 2012

Gloucestershire Echo

OSCAR winning actor Jeremy Irons left a Bishop’s Cleeve resident stunned when he pulled up on his motorbike outside her house.

The Die Hard film star is a keen environmentalist and visited the village to find out about its nearby toxic waste dump, Wingmoor Farm.

He was filmed speaking to Safety in Waste and Rubbish Disposal (SWARD ) campaigner, Barbara Farmer.

The documentary, Trashed, which features footage of the village and Cleeve Hill, has now been selected for a special screening at Cannes international film festival.

Barbara said: “It was quite surreal to have Jeremy Irons motorcycle up to my house and knock on my door. He spent a lot of time talking with me as the cameras rolled, finding out all about the blight of having thousands of tonnes of toxic incinerator chimney ash dumped on the edge of our villages in open conditions.

“He was astounded by the scale of the hazardous landfill so close to a residential area and in such a beauty spot.”

Blenheim Films came to visit Bishop’s Cleeve as part of a tour of worldwide locations that have been blighted by waste disposal.

The crew spent a day filming the area then came back to film the protest in September 2011 when SWARD held a protest to coincide with the Gloucestershire County Council Planning Committee’s site visit.

“I was astonished to get a text from the director telling me that she was sitting with Vangelis, who has written the music for the film, watching my clip,” Barbara said.

“So far we’ve only seen the trailer, which included a brief glimpse of Jeremy Irons with Cleeve Hill behind him. We can’t wait to see the finished film.”

SWARD is delighted that Trashed has been selected for Cannes.

Barbara said: “”It is very apt timing. Gloucestershire faces the awful prospect of a massive incinerator at Javelin Park. If this application is granted we will have to feed the burner 24 hours a day seven days a week with precious resources that can’t be replaced and at a terrible cost to our environment.

“Anyone who thinks burning rubbish is a safe and clean option should come to see the vast quantities of toxic ash that are dumped at Wingmoor.

“Trashed” shows why we have to simply stop producing waste and start realising that on a finite planet what we throw away comes back to haunt us.”

The trailer can be viewed at Trashedfilm.com

Jeremy Irons Joins ‘Beautiful Creatures’

From the Hollywood Reporter , Deadline.com and exclusive information from jeremyirons.net

Jeremy Irons has joined the cast of Beautiful Creatures, Alcon’s adaptation of the young adult novel by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl.

Jeremy Irons is the most recent in a flurry of casting announcements, joining Viola Davis (Amma), Emma Thompson (Mrs. Lincoln/Sarafine), Emmy Rossum (Ridley), Thomas Mann (Link) and relative newcomers Alden Ehrenreich (Ethan) and Alice Englert (Lena).

Ehrenreich and Englert are the centerpieces of the coming-of-age story about two star-crossed teens – one a local boy, the other a mysterious new girl – who uncover dark secrets about their families, their history and their town.

Jeremy will play the role of Macon Ravenwood, the mysterious and reclusive uncle of Englert’s character. Macon is an incubus who can see and steal the dreams of others.

Erwin Stoff (Water for ElephantsI Am Legend) will produce along with Kosove and Johnson (The Blind SideThe Book of Eli) and Molly Smith (Something Borrowed, P.S. I Love You.)

Filming begins in April 2012 in and around New Orleans.  Jeremy will likely be on set from approximately April 19 to June 23, after he finishes filming Night Train to Lisbon and before starting production on Season 3 of Showtime’s The Borgias.

Richard LaGravenese (P.S. I Love You) will direct from his adaptation.

Alcon, which has film rights to all three books in the series published by Little Brown Books, including Beautiful Darkness, and Beautiful Chaos, is looking at Beautiful Creatures to kick off a possible franchise at WB.  A fourth book, Beautiful Redemption, will be released October 23, 2012.

Alcon recently produced the hit Dolphin Tale, a 3-D family film starring Morgan Freeman, Harry Connick Jr., Ashley Judd and Kris Kristofferson.

Irons is repped by CAA and Ken McReddie Associates.

Jeremy Irons currently stars in Showtime’s period drama The Borgias, which returns for a second season on April 8, 2012. Film-wise, he was last seen in Margin Call and will next been seen in CBS Films’ The Words, which also stars Bradley Cooper. Other future films of Jeremy’s include BBC’s Henry IV: Parts 1 & 2 and Night Train to Lisbon.

Jeremy Irons in Iceland

Jeremy Irons Probes Pollution in Iceland

British actor Jeremy Irons traveled to Ísafjördur in the Icelandic West Fjords last weekend along with a crew from the production company Blenheim Films, which is making a documentary on pollution. Irons is the film’s narrator.

 

The outgoing editor of Iceland Review’s print edition, Bjarni Brynjólfsson, served as an assistant to the crew. He said the filmmakers learned of the dioxin pollution caused by the waste burning station Funi in Ísafjördur and wanted to include it in the documentary.

The project is international and covers problems caused by pollution all around the world. Brynjólfsson told Morgunbladid Irons had not wanted to give any interviews during his stay in Iceland.

 

Jeremy Irons Wall Street Journal Interview

The Wall Street Journal

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT
MARCH 25, 2011

Feeling Wrong for the Role, at First
By AMY CHOZICK

Read the original article here – Wall Street Journal Online

Thirty years after he played Charles Ryder in the British miniseries “Brideshead Revisited,” actor Jeremy Irons takes on another TV role that involves Catholicism, opulence and distrust: Rodrigo Borgia, the scheming patriarch and corrupt Pope Alexander VI in Showtime’s “The Borgias,” premiering April 3.

Watch a scene from Showtime’s new drama ‘The Borgias.’ The series stars Jeremy Irons as Pope Alexander VI. Courtesy Showtime.

Mr. Irons, 62, is perhaps best known for film roles including Claus von Bülow in “Reversal of Fortune,” for which he won an Oscar, and Humbert Humbert in “Lolita.” He also starred in TV miniseries like the 2009 Lifetime biopic “Georgia O’Keeffe” with Joan Allen and “Elizabeth I,” with Helen Mirren.

His deep, languid voice is currently in theaters as the narrator of wildlife documentary “The Last Lions.” (He voiced the villain Scar in “The Lion King.”) In “Margin Call,” an upcoming film about the financial crisis, Mr. Irons plays an embattled Wall Street CEO based on Lehman Brothers’ Richard Fuld.

Mr. Irons was reluctant to commit to an ongoing TV series, but the nine-episode cable run and the fact that Irish director Neil Jordan (“The Crying Game”) would write and direct “The Borgias,” convinced him.

The Wall Street Journal: Why is “The Borgias” being touted as a kind of medieval version of “The Godfather”?

Mr. Irons: There’s an element in common in that Don Corleone was an Italian in America. Rodrigo is a Spaniard in Rome. Yes, that element of the manipulator and the immigrant trying to find power and how to hold onto it and influence people as the head of the family. But those parallels don’t run very deep. I think it’s sort of a marketing idea Showtime had. [Mario] Puzo wrote a novel [“The Family”] about the Borgias, of course.

You’ve said you don’t think you’re right for the role of Rodrigo. Why not?

Neil [Jordan] said “Do you want to play Rodrigo Borgia?” I got home and Googled him and I told him “Christ, you don’t want me. You need James Gandolfini.” I could think of four or five actors who would physically be right for the role. I said “I can’t play that guy.” I have an aesthetic quality that is expected from a pope, whereas this guy was a big, sweaty Spaniard with a big appetite—a lot of food, a lot of women.

So why did you change your mind?

Neil said “No, it’s all about power and how power corrupts you and how you manipulate it. No one knows what he really looked like.” So he convinced me.

Even though Rodrigo is an evil megalomaniac, there’s some humor in him. Did you bring that to it?

I think it’s all in Neil’s writing. There’s sort of a natural amusingness about the situation which one doesn’t have to play. You just do what you do and it brushes off on somebody and there’s a smile there.

Speaking of humor, why wasn’t the 1997 film version of “Lolita” you starred in funnier? The book is very funny.

That book is full of irony. I think we were so nervous about the subject when we were making it that we were walking on egg shells. We could have used a lot more irony. The Kubrick version had more irony but it missed a lot of other things.

In addition to “The Borgias,” you’ve recently done a couple of episodes of “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit.” How did that come about?

Well, “SVU” is a different kettle of fish. I was in Budapest finishing “The Borgias” and they asked and I said I don’t know the show. They sent me an episode with Robin Williams and one with Isabelle Huppert. I said “This is good, it’s fine. It is what it is.” For an actor it feels a little like you’ve just finished reading Proust and you think “I’m going to read a Dick Francis novel and it will take me a day and be great.”

“The Tudors” did very well for Showtime but it got criticism for being soft porn in costumes. Will “The Borgias” have as much sex and nudity?

No. There are a lot of channels doing that. I think we can do better than that. This adaptation, for example, and there have been loads, doesn’t fall into the trap of writing all these stories about incest. In those days whole families used to sleep in the same bed. It’s better to get inside characters, who they are and why they do what they do than to make it sensationalist.

You seem to regularly go from film to TV to theater. Which do you prefer?

It’s just the material. They all have good things about them and they all have bad things about them. Theater is great because you can really stay in one place and work on the character in depth over a long period. It doesn’t pay as much as movies, but is often better written. The problem with TV is people are watching soccer at the same time. I’m really lucky to hop around. I’m a jobbing actor.

How is developing a character for TV different from one for film?

The huge luxury is time. A two-hour movie—and, if you’re lucky, it’s two hours—you can tell a story but it’s hard to develop the inconsistencies of a character and have time to bring all those inconsistencies together.

Are you Catholic?

My wife is. My children are. I don’t belong to clubs.

It may shock a lot of Catholics to see a Pope who behaves like Rodrigo Borgia.

Well, the medieval mind would’ve had no problem with a pope who has a mistress. Why do you expect him to be a God? He’s not a God. He’s a man, with all the weaknesses and failures. [Today] we expect our leaders to be squeaky clean and when they turn out to be normal people with normal desires, we say this person shouldn’t be our leader. Man is just doing his best.

Have you discussed a second season with Showtime?

We have a little. Neil has talked to me about some ideas. It’s hard to get the Pope out of the Vatican. I’m very grateful Showtime was hands-off when we were shooting. They left us alone. I hope that will continue because I don’t think you can make movies or TV series by committee.

Printed in The Wall Street Journal, page D5

Copyright 2011 Dow Jones & Company, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Jeremy Irons to Narrate ‘The Final Coronation’

Oscar winner joins choir in Warwick

07 March 2011 – from the Stratford Observer

OSCAR-WINNING actor Jeremy Irons joins Armonico Consort in Warwick on March 26.
The star of stage and screen will be at St Mary’s Church to launch the choir’s tenth anniversary year, which aims to raise a further £100,000 for their Big Mouth Appeal – creating children’s choirs and training teachers as choir leaders.
In a programme called ‘The Final Coronation’ narrated by the actor, the award-winning choir will recreate elements of the ceremony from 1963 when the pope was last ‘crowned’, singing music performed at every coronation for 400 years by Palestrina and Orlando di Lasso.
Irons  is a familiar with the area having trod the boards at the RSC in Stratford on numerous occasions. He is also a well-known face on the big and small screen. He won an Oscar for his portrayal of Claus von Bülow lies in the 1990 film Reversal of Fortune. He is best known to television viewers for playing Charles Ryder in the classic adaptation of Brideshead Revisited.
Tickets are available from the Ticket Factory on 0844 581 0750 or via www.armonico.org.uk

Jeremy Irons at BAM for Diary of a Madman

Critics night at “The Diary Of A Madman” at BAM starring Geoffrey Rush with Jeremy Irons at Brooklyn Academy of Music on February 16, 2011 in New York City.

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