Jeremy Irons Criticizes Slovak Police’s Behavior Against Activists

Jeremy Irons Criticizes Slovak Police’s Behavior Against Activists
By Peter Sedik
Epoch Times Staff Jun 22, 2009

TRENCIN, Slovakia—Jeremy Irons criticized action taken by the Slovak police against human rights activists during the visit of General Secretary of the Communist Party Hu on Thursday, June 18.

About one hour before Hu Jintao arrived in Slovakia last Thursday, human rights activists gathered in front of the Presidential Palace to unfold banners and peacefully appeal for freedom in China.

The pro-communists members of the Chinese delegation started to assault the demonstrators while the Slovak police watched passively and refused to intervene. The police even arrested six demonstrators.

It took multiple calls from Slovak citizens before the police would protect the peaceful demonstrators.

The British actor visited the Art Film Fest, one of the most reputable film festivals in Slovakia. He received the Actor’s Mission Award for his accomplishments. On Saturday Trencianske Teplice city fixed a bronze plaque with his name on the Bridge of Fame.

Jeremy Irons also attended the screening of the American documentary “The Power of the Powerless,” which he himself narrated. The film investigates why today many Czechs don’t want their communist past dug up. It has been 20 years since the Velvet Revolution, which led to a peaceful overthrow of the former Czechoslovakia’s communist regime.

Jeremy Irons Actor’s Mission Award Videos and Photos

British actor Jeremy Irons followed the tradition of Art Film Fest, one of the largest Slovak film festivals, by fixing a bronze plaque with his name on the Bridge of Fame on June 20.

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Photos of Jeremy at the Ballets Russes Press Night

Jeremy Irons attends English National Ballet’s centenery celebration

Chanel’s Lagerfeld puts the fashion back in ballet

By Katy Taylor and Terry Kirby Last updated at 11:06am on 17.06.09

It was a case of high fashion both on and off stage at Sadler’s Wells last night.

A glamorous first-night audience turned out for English National Ballet‘s centenery celebration of the legendary Ballet Russes, with some of the costumes designed by Karl Lagerfeld.

Among those in attendance were Lagerfeld’s muse Amanda Harlech, milliner Philip Treacy and Jasmine Guinness.

Also present were actors Damian Lewis and his wife Helen McCrory, Richard E Grant and Jeremy Irons.

“It was fabulous,” Lewis enthused, while the new Dr Who, actor Matt Smith, described it as ”wonderful”.

“They’re absolutely fabulous,” said Jo Wood, estranged wife of Rolling Stone Ronnie Wood. “If I had my time again I’d definitely be a ballet dancer.”

The performance was made up of four dances, including the Dying Swan. It also included the world premiere of Faun(e), a re-imagining of Nijinsky’s L’apres-midi d’un Faune, by internationally acclaimed choreographer David Dawson.

Lagerfeld’s designs for the principal dancers in The Dying Swan and another dance, Apollo, continue a tradition begun by Coco Chanel, whose Parisian fashion house he now heads.

Last night The Dying Swan was danced by Elena Glurdjidze, the senior principal dancer with the ENB, wearing a tutu designed by Lagerfeld using ostrich and a variety of other bird feathers. The four-minute dance was originally created for the legendary Anna Pavlova.

In Apollo, the principal dancers, real-life husband and wife Thomas Edur and Agnes Oaks, wore costumes based by Lagerfeld on classical Greek designs. Chanel herself was a close friend and benefactor of Sergei Diaghilev, who founded the Ballet Russes in 1909.

She created the original costumes for Apollo in 1929 and had an affair with its composer, Igor Stravinsky.

As well as Chanel and Nijinsky, Diaghilev collaborated with other major choreographers, composers, artists and dancers including Pavlova, Picasso, Debussy and Matisse.

Two of the original Ballet Russes dancers, Dame Alicia Markova and Anton Dolin, went on to become founders of the ENB.

The Ballet Russes season continues until Saturday.

Jeremy on jury for ICCL Film School Competition

Film on Irish transgender person wins rights award

GENEVIEVE CARBERY

Fri, Jun 12, 2009

A FILM telling the true story of an Irish transgender person was presented with a human rights film award in Dublin last night.

American actor and film-maker Rebecca Miller was among the well-known film world figures at the gala for the Irish Council for Civil Liberties’ (ICCL) Human Rights Film School competition.

Winning short film My Identity was directed by Vittoria Colonna. The documentary tells of the battle and discrimination faced by transgender person Lee and the impact which his identity had on his daughter Siobhán.

“I challenge anyone to watch the winning film and retain a shred of prejudice against transgendered people,” said jury member and film-maker Kirsten Sheridan.

She was joined on the jury by people from the film and human rights world including Rebecca Miller, director Jim Sheridan actors Jeremy Irons and Sinead Cusack and Senator David Norris.

My Identity was among six finalist films screened at the Light House Cinema last night. They ranged in topics from migration and war, to poverty and identity.

The short films were in animation and documentary formats. The competition helped to bring human rights to a wider audience, said ICCL director Mark Kelly.

Migration was the theme of two of the short animated films. Aimed at children, Team Spirit explored the issues faced by a boy from Darfur who is a refugee in Ireland. Pirogues examined the impact of borders on the lives of two couples.

The documentary Children of Manila told the story of three street children in the Philippine capital and revealed the hope that education can provide.

Irish-based documentary, 8 Things to Remember, explored the work of plane spotters at Shannon airport. Since 2003 they have been documenting landings by US military aircraft on their way to Iraq and Afghanistan.

A Life Inside the Frame is a stop-motion animated short exploring the struggle of an outsider to break free from societal constraints.

© 2009 The Irish Times

Art Film Fest to Welcome Romantic Lover and Sad Intellectual Jeremy Irons!

10 June 2009
Press Release

from artfilmfest.sk

He considered a career as a veterinarian, but failed the entrance exams. He cleaned houses and maintained streetside plants. And finally, he became one of the world’s best-known actors, awarded with the most prestigious prizes.

The illustrious Jeremy Irons has accepted our invitation to Art Film Fest, and on Saturday, 20 June, he will personally accept the Actor’s Mission Award and fix a brass plaque bearing his name to the Bridge of Fame in Trenčianske Teplice.

Through the years of his prolific acting career, this star of films such as Lolita, Die Hard: With a Vengeance, The Man in the Iron Mask, and Damage has performed alongside such renowned performers as Meryl Streep, Ben Kingsley, Liv Tyler, Juliette Binoche, Glenn Close, Melanie Griffith and Rachel Weisz. Irons has portrayed romantic lovers, torn intellectuals and even psychopaths.

In the film Lolita (1997) he flawlessly portrays Professor Humbert, who smoulders with devastating desire for his very young stepdaughter. This film adaptation of Vladimir Nabokov’s novel of the same name was directed by romantic drama specialist Adrian Lyne, who has films such as Fatal Attraction and 9 1/2 Weeks under his belt. Today, many readers of Lolita cannot imagine the mad, miserably enamoured professor as anyone other than Irons.

Jeremy Irons was born on 19 September, 1948 in the small town of Cowes, on the Isle of Wight, Great Britain. He received his acting education at Bristol’s Old Vic School, and after graduating he accepted an engagement with their travelling theatre troupe. His first step towards a stable acting career was performing in serials such as The Pallisers (1975) and Love for Lydia (1977). His breakthrough role could be considered the biographical film of the renowned dancer Nijinsky (1981), where Irons played famed choreographer Mikhail Fokine.

He drew considerable attention with his second film, The French Lieutenant’s Woman (1981), where he acted alongside Meryl Streep. Here he portrays two spiritually connected people – an intellectual and a lover, who fall in love with a mysterious woman. These roles were perfectly suited to Irons’ temperament, and he was their ideal performer, thanks in part to his elegant, even patrician features and striking eyes.

Irons also lent his mournful face to other roles of fated lovers. On the silver screen he has succumbed to the love of numerous ladies: Patricia Hodge in Betrayal (1982), Ornella Muti in Swann in Love (1984) and Juliette Binoche in Damage (1992).

The first significant acknowledgement of Irons’ work came in 1984. For his role in the Broadway production The Real Thing, where he performed with Glenn Close, he was granted the prestigious theatrical prize the Tony Award. Four years later, he received a Best Actor award from the New York Film Critics Circle Award for his double role as twin-brother gynaecologists in the picture Dead Ringers.
In 1990, he earned the most prestigious film award, an Oscar, as well as a Golden Globe for Best Actor for his role in the film Reversal of Fortune, based on true events, where he played an aristocrat accused of twice attempting to murder his wife.

Irons excelled in the picture The Mission (1986) with Robert De Niro, where he took the role of a Jesuit missionary who attempts to spread Christianity among Amazonian natives and puts stake in their defence.

Irons has also visited Prague, thanks to the filming of Kafka (1991), the fictitious picture inspired by the writer Franz Kafka, a Prague native. The film was directed by the famed Steven Soderbergh, who entrusted Irons with the lead role as Jewish bureaucrat Kafka. During his stay in Prague, Irons also acted in the film version of Václav Havel’s The Beggar’s Opera, shot by Jiří Menzel.
Irons remembers meeting Jiří Menzel for dinner and asking him if he could act in Menzel’s film. Menzel invited Irons to do so, so he came, and they dressed him and made him up. They filmed the scene in two hours and Irons was paid twenty-five dollars. It was a fantastic collaboration according to Irons, who recounted it during his 2005 stay in Bratislava, when he was a guest of the TOM 2004 awards ceremony. He also visited Bratislava in 1991, on his way from the Prague filming to Berlin. He spent one day in Slovakia, buying an accordion and pictures.

Irons’ wife is actress Sinéad Cusack. They acted together in Bernardo Bertolucci’s Stealing Beauty (1995), which was also the final film of popular French actor Jean Marais.
Irons’ name is also connected with Hollywood. He played the main villain, craving money and revenge, in Die Hard: With a Vengeance, alongside Bruce Willis. In The Man in the Iron Mask he portrayed Aramis, whose undergoes a religious conversion. His co-actors in that film included John Malkovich and Gérard Depardieu. In Ridley Scott’s epic Kingdom Heaven, he is reincarnated as Commander Tiberias. And he took the role of an evil wizard in the film adaptation of the role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons.

Irons’ hobbies include riding horses and motorcycles, skiing and gardening.

———————————————————————————————————–

Organizers: ART FILM, n.o., FORZA Production House Co-Organizers: the Town of Trenčianske Teplice, the Town of Trenčín, Health Spa Trenčianske Teplice
The Festival is made possible through the financial support of the Ministry of Culture of the Slovak Republic.

General Sponsors: AquaCity Poprad, zdravotná poisťovňa Dôvera
Main Sponsors: Omnia Holding, Tatra banka, Tauris, the Central European Foundation, Slovnaft Official Transport Provider: Lancia Logistics Sponsor: DHL Sponsors: Provimi Pet Food, Dr. Max, Enagro, Hotel Baske, AVI Studio Official Suppliers: Hubert, Parkhotel na Baračke, GS design, Segafredo Zanetti SR, Philips, Via France Slovak cinema is brought to you by Zlatý Bažant

Main Media Sponsors: Slovenská televízia, Pravda, Zoznam.sk, Boomerang, Žurnál Media Sponsors: televízia Markíza, FilmBox, Televízia Central, Rádio Okey, Rádio Hit FM, Markíza, Pardon, Cinemax, Kam do mesta, port.sk, kedykam.sk, superobed.sk, ISPA, SITA, Q-EX, Trenčianske Echo Partners: Hotel Praha, Hotel Flóra, Hotel Tatra, Slovak Film Institute, Italian Cultural Institute Bratislava, CzechTourism, Intersonic, Tatrafilm, Slovak Film and Television Academy, Esterle & Esterle, lampART, Celtima

Jeremy Irons attends Cherry Orchard afterparty

Jeremy Irons attended the Press Night performances of The Cherry Orchard and Winter’s Tale at the Old Vic, on Tuesday 9 June 2009.

An afterparty was held at The Buddha Bar in London.  Some of those in attendance included Kevin Spacey, Ethan Hawke, Sam Mendes, Sinead Cusack, Rebecca Hall, Andrea Corr, Ryan Shawhughes (wife of Ethan Hawke), Josh Hamilton, Peter Hall, Emma Hall, Alan Yentob, Tom Stoppard, Simon Russell Beale and  Fiona Shaw.

jeremy-irons-arrives-at-the-old-vic-for-the-bridge-project

Jeremy Irons and Simon Russell Beale - photo by Dave M. Bennett/Getty Images

Jeremy Irons and Simon Russell Beale - photo by Dave M. Bennett/Getty Images

Sinead Cusack and Jeremy Irons - photo by Dave M. Bennett/Getty Images

Sinead Cusack and Jeremy Irons - photo by Dave M. Bennett/Getty Images

Jeremy Irons and Ethan Hawke - photo by Dave M. Bennett/Getty Images

Jeremy Irons and Ethan Hawke - photo by Dave M. Bennett/Getty Images

Sam Mendes and Jeremy Irons - photo by Dave M. Bennett/Getty Images

Sam Mendes and Jeremy Irons - photo by Dave M. Bennett/Getty Images

cherryafterparty8

More new photos of Max modeling for Mango

Jeremy Irons attends celebration of Harold Pinter

from The Independent

Harold Pinter: a celebration, National Theatre, London
Some pauses to remember

judelawliawilliamsjeremyironspintertribute

Reviewed by Michael Coveney
Tuesday, 9 June 2009

Sunday night’s celebration of Harold Pinter, who died last Christmas, was a unique occasion which did something none of the fulsome obituaries quite managed: it reminded you how much actors love performing his stuff, what wonderful material he gave them, and how his work defined, to a very great extent, the acting styles of the last century.

And what a range of talent on view, from Colin Firth reprising his definitive performance as the lobotomised Aston in The Caretaker and David Bradley bringing the house down with that play’s hilarious speech about a tramp searching for a pair of shoes in a monastery in Luton, through to Eileen Atkins and Sheila Hancock as a pair of derelict old women discussing night buses in an early sketch that Hancock actually introduced in 1959.

This was like watching Peter Cook and Dudley Moore embalmed in their raincoats. The rhythm and London argot of Pinter’s writing caught the new satire wave, continued the spare, clipped style of Noël Coward to some extent, and allowed the British modern actor to develop laconic, brutal, and mostly post-Christian investigations into the psychology of modern manners and relationships.

Jude Law partnered the lustrous Indira Varma in the double adultery confession from The Lover, and Michael Sheen and Janie Dee played the edgily tense encounter from Betrayal in which her affair with his best friend is first acknowledged; that was being watched by Jeremy Irons, who appeared in the film, and Henry Woolf, Pinter’s oldest friend from schooldays, who arranged the love nest for Pinter and Joan Bakewell, the root of the 1978 play.

Irons wore a stunning pair of red shoes, Gina McKee a mauve dress, Penelope Wilton a much better black outfit than she has for Gertrude in Law’s Hamlet, and the actors sat in a big V, expertly marshalled by director Ian Rickson, beautifully lit by Peter Mumford and joined movingly at the end by students from LAMDA reciting Pinter’s Nobel Prize speech, as they did in the author’s presence last October.

Alan Rickman and Lindsay Duncan crossed swords over a languorous McKee in Old Times, while Douglas Hodge and Samuel West brought Pinter’s outstandingly evocative tributes to the actor-manager Anew McMaster and the cricketer Arthur Wellard to pulsating life. Kenneth Cranham did one of the great speeches from The Homecoming and Andy de la Tour got us delightfully lost in Bolsover Street from No Man’s Land.

Lia Williams, Susan Wooldridge, Roger Lloyd Pack, Harry Burton, Henry Goodman and Lloyd Hutchinson all had their moments. The programme was brilliantly compiled to include a good selection of poems, too, including several written for Pinter’s second wife, Antonia Fraser, and several angry ones, including “Cricket at Night”, done by Irons with great steel.

Lovely stuff indeed: a special treat.
____________________________________________________________________________________________
from The Guardian
by Michael Billington
8 June 2009

Stars celebrate the passion and poetry of Harold Pinter

A first-rate cast paid tribute to the great playwright last night with a series of readings and scenes at the National Theatre.

A great understanding of the heart’s affections … Harold Pinter.

The stars turned out in force last night for a celebration of the work of Harold Pinter, who died last December. Jude Law and Penelope Wilton rushed straight from a matinee of Hamlet to join the glittering onstage ensemble at the Olivier theatre – one that included Jeremy Irons, Colin Firth, Alan Rickman, Lindsay Duncan, Eileen Atkins, Janie Dee and a host of others for whom the memory of Pinter is strong and abiding.

The form of the evening, which was directed by Ian Rickson, had a crystalline, Pinteresque clarity. No eulogies, speeches or florid tributes: simply a focus on the work itself, revealing Pinter’s poetry and polemical vigour. If Pinter’s generosity came across, it was in some of his prose pieces. Douglas Hodge read three extracts from Pinter’s portrait of the great Irish actor, Anew McMaster, in which Pinter recalled playing Iago to McMaster’s Othello before a riotously drunken Saint Patrick’s Day audience. Sam West also reminded us of Pinter’s affectionate tribute to the great Somerset bowler, Arthur Wellard.

The passion and humour of Pinter’s plays was also richly represented. We had David Bradley and Colin Firth doing speeches from The Caretaker: the one evoking the vagrant aggression of Davies, the other the desolate pathos of Aston. We had Eileen Atkins and Sheila Hancock in the sketch The Black and White, as two old women keeping death at bay. I was also constantly reminded of the erotic tension in Pinter’s work. Lia Williams in The Homecoming, the sinuous Gina McKee and the svelte Lindsay Duncan in Old Times, and Janie Dee and Michael Sheen in Betrayal, all reminded us of Pinter’s ability to raise the sexual temperature to boiling point.

But it wasn’t simply an evening of famous names – and here I must declare an interest. At the climax, nine students from the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art, who I directed last year, performed an abbreviated version of Pinter’s Nobel lecture. I am hardly objective, but their energy and attack was deeply moving in that it showed the baton of Pinter performance being passed from one generation to the next. But perhaps the last word should lie with the poetry. To hear three of Pinter’s love-poems to his wife, Antonia Fraser, was to find one’s eyes pricked with tears, and to be reminded of a great playwright’s understanding of the heart’s affections.

___________________________________________________________________________________________
from Whatsonstage.com Blogs
8 June 2009

by Michael Covemey

Sher pleasure with Pinter

I topped and tailed my weekend in the same place, with one or two of the same people.

On Friday night the National Theatre hosted the new exhibition of paintings and drawings by Antony Sher, and on Sunday the Olivier auditorium was packed for a remarkable celebration of Harold Pinter.

Alan Rickman joined the Sher throng on a break from rehearsing his Old Times scene with Lindsay Duncan for the Pinter tribute. And Sher’s cousin, playwright of the moment Ronald Harwood, mingled with fellow South African refugees Sue McGregor, Janet Suzman and Richard E Grant before returning for his old friend Harold’s special evening.

If a bomb had gone off at either event, the British theatre would have had to start all over again this morning. I doubt if so many distinguished folk have ever crowded into the National over one weekend before — and there had already been a big exodus to the Tony Awards in New York where Billy Elliot has won ten gongs, one less than Spring Awakening two years ago (and about ten too many, in my view).

The Sher show has a big new canvas called The Audience, in which you can have fun spotting a wide gallery of heroes and villains in Sher’s life, and a few big oils that are really oustanding. My favourite is that of Mark Rylance in his youth in Stratford, sitting on a sofa like an other-worldly Peter Pan, eyes staring, boots scuffed and discarded. It could be yours for £3000.

There are beautiful crayon drawings of Brian Cox as Titus (Brian turned up in the flesh for the Pinter party), Thelma Holt in New York and Rupert Graves. And there are separate pen and ink studies of Ian McKellen and Eric Porter in the NT’s 1992 Uncle Vanya in which Sher played Astrov alongside those two great classicists.

Gregory Doran, Sher’s partner, is drawn reading against an olive tree, while Sher’s former partner Jim Hooper was excitedly checking out his own representation with his brother Robin. I said hello Robin to Jim and hello Jim to Robin, and they’re not twins or even remotely similar looking, but it was Friday night and the wine was flowing, so nobody cared too much.

The Pinter performance was one of the best tribute shows I’ve ever seen — I do hope somebody filmed it — and was quite beautifully directed by Ian Rickson. Everyone in it was wonderful, even Jude Law who’s taken a bit of a battering for his angry but dull Hamlet.

Michael Sheen and Douglas Hodge were not outshone but certainly matched by David Bradley and Lia Williams, but Jeremy Irons upstaged everyone with his extraordinary red ruby shoes.Not a friend of Dorothy, after all, surely?

Sheila Hancock and Eileen Atkins played two old gals in a cafe like an embalmed Dud and Pete sketch, and the LAMDA students whom Michael Billington directed last October in a Pinter programme joined their professional precursors in a moving finale.

There were some good “starters for ten” questions to pose among ourselves, such as — what was Maggie Smith’s only connection with Pinter? She gave one of her finest early film performances in The Pumpkin Eater which Pinter scripted.

Maggie was accompanying her great friend Joan Plowright, sitting across the aisle from Peter Eyre. Howard Jacobson and Tony Harrison (with his partner actress Sian Thomas) joined other playwrights Hugh Whitemore and Stephen Poliakoff in toasting their great contemporary.

I sat in a critics’ row with Matt Wolf, Vanessa Thorpe (arts reporter on The Observer) and Benedict Nightingale, and our nearest neighbours included Lynsey Baxter, Michael Blakemore, radio producer Ned Chaillet, Timothy West and Prunella Scales (son Sam brought the great Somerset cricketer and Pinter friend Arthur Wellard to life, although Ben Nightingale thought that he was about to recall someone else altogether, the flat-faced old character actor Arthur Mullard).

It was a marvellous evening and one of the best performances was that of BBC arts supremo Alan Yentob roaming the stalls bar in the interval to see if he could find anyone as important as himself to talk to.
___________________________________________________________________________________________
from The First Post
8 June 2009

Theatreland remembers Harold Pinter
Actors, writers and family gather at the National Theatre to celebrate the life of the great playwright
By Nigel Horne
FIRST POSTED JUNE 8, 2009

While Broadway was at the Tonys, many of London’s best-known stage actors spent their Sunday night off paying tribute to Harold Pinter, who died on Christmas Eve, at a memorial celebration at the National Theatre. Hundreds of actors, directors and fellow writers piled into the Olivier Theatre for an evening of readings from his plays, poetry and prose.

“It was amazing. Everyone was there,” said The First Post’s spy. “It was sad to think of him gone but it was also a very funny night, because many of the readings were so hilarious.” Among those who had the house in stitches were Douglas Hodge reading from Mac, Pinter’s memoir of his touring days in the 1950s with the Irish actor-manager Anew McMaster, and Penelope Wilton reading from the monoloque Tess.

Almost every London actor seemed to be involved: among the highlights were Jeremy Irons and Indira Varma reading from Apart From That, David Bradley from The Caretaker and Janie Dee and Michael Sheen from Betrayal.

Lindsay Duncan, Jude Law, Alan Rickman, Gina McKee and Kenneth Cranham were also in the line-up, while students from LAMDA read from Pinter’s 2005 Nobel Prize acceptance speech – a lecture he had to record in London because he was too ill to attend the ceremony in Stockholm.

“I think Harold would have been thrilled, and pleased to see us, all these actors he has kicked around with over the years,” said Lindsay Duncan on the eve of the event. “He was a mighty figure, a universal, unique writer; his work won’t ever go away.”

The audience included directors Peter Hall and Trevor Nunn, and fellow playwrights Stephen Poliakoff and Tom Stoppard.

Pinter’s widow, Lady Antonia Fraser, attended the celebration along with members of her family. She sat quietly at the back of the auditorium, reflecting on the 33 years she spent with the writer of such modern stage classics as The Birthday Party, The Caretaker and The Homecoming.

Fraser let it be known almost immediately after Pinter’s death that she was putting her historical books on hold while she worked on a memoir of her life with him. It has now been announced that the book, Must You Go? My Life with Harold Pinter, will be published next January.

Alan Samson of publishers Weidenfeld & Nicholson described Fraser and Pinter’s relationship as “modern literature’s most celebrated and enduring marriage”.

Fraser, 76, said she was basing the memoir partly on her diaries, which she has kept since 1968, when she was still with her first husband, Sir Hugh Fraser, and partly on personal recollections.

She has stressed that the book will not be the complete life of Harold Pinter, but a love story – “and as with many love stories, the beginning and the end, the first light and the twilight, are dealt with more fully than the high noon in between, described more impressionistically.”
FIRST POSTED JUNE 8, 2009
More People stories

http://www.thefirstpost.co.uk/48520,news,theatreland-remembers-harold-pinter-at-national-theatre-celebration

Max Irons in Hola magazine – Great new photos!

Max Irons in Hola Magazine - photo by Francesco Carrozzini

Max Irons in Hola Magazine - photo by Francesco Carrozzini

from http://www.hola.com – Translated from Spanish

Actor Max Irons, son of actor Jeremy Irons, makes the jump to the world of fashion

Handsome, and above all, one of the young actors of the moment. Max Irons, son of film star Jeremy Irons, has managed to make the most of his attractive face and not only decided to conquer the big screen, but also the world of fashion.

During the autumn-winter 2009-2010, will face Max HE homini Emerito, male line of signature Mango (for its part, Scarlett Johansson is responsible for women’s proposals show the company as you were informed a few days). The young British actor, 23, traveled in May to Barcelona to pose for these advertisements against a target of Italian photographer Francesco Carrozzini (also went to the Mango fashion show for next season).

However, it is not the first time participating in an advertising campaign. In fact, some seasons ago, was the face of Burberry house.

Photo by Francesco Carrozzini

Photo by Francesco Carrozzini

Photo by Francesco Carrozzini

Photo by Francesco Carrozzini

Photo by Francesco Carrozzini

Photo by Francesco Carrozzini

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