Jeremy Irons Joins the Cast of ‘High Rise’

high rise

EXCLUSIVE: Jeremy Irons, Sienna Miller join Tom Hiddleston on RPC satire. Text Source

Jeremy Irons and Sienna Miller have joined Tom Hiddleston on Jeremy Thomas’ anticipated JG Ballard adaptation High-Rise from Sightseers and Kill List director Ben Wheatley.

Oscar-winner Irons, who will also shoot Zack Snyder’s Batman vs. Superman this year, will play a visionary architect while the in-demand Foxcatcher star Miller will play his devoted aide who strikes up a relationship with Hiddleston’s character Robert Laing.

Production is due to get underway in July in Belfast, Northern Ireland, on the project, which HanWay is shopping in Cannes.

The film centres on a new residential tower built on the eve of Margaret Thatcher’s rise to power, at the site of what will soon become the world’s financial hub. Designed as a luxurious solution to the problems of the city, it is a world apart.

Enter Robert Laing (Hiddleston), a young doctor seduced by the high-rise and its creator, the visionary architect Anthony Royal (Irons). Laing discovers a world of complex loyalties, and also strikes up a relationship with Royal’s devoted aide Charlotte (Miller).

But rot has set in beneath the flawless surface. Sensing discord amongst the tenants, Laing meets Wilder, a charismatic provocateur bent on inciting the situation. Wilder initiates Laing into the hidden life of the high-rise and Laing is shocked at what he sees. As the residents break into tribal factions, Laing finds himself in the middle of mounting violence. Violence that he also finds emerging in himself.

Additional casting is underway on the project scripted by Wheatley’s wife and regular collaborator Amy Jump. Backers include Film4, Northern Ireland Screen and the BFI, which has committed more than £1m to the project.

Thomas said: “I’m excited to adapt another Ballard book, whose books are full of so many ideas, and to be working with Ben and Amy, Tom, Jeremy and Sienna, and working with Ben and the cast in a movie like this is why I love producing films.”

Wheatley added: “I’ve been a fan of Sienna’s since seeing her heartbreaking role in Factory Girl. There’s a steely resilience in her performances, and I know she will be excellent in her central role in High-Rise.

“What can you say about Jeremy Irons? From Dead Ringers to Margin Call, Jeremy has been creating indelible performances. He’s one of our finest actors and it’s very exciting to work with him.”

Previous adaptations of Ballard’s work include RPC’S controversial drama Crash, directed by David Cronenberg, and Steven Spielberg’s epic, six-time Oscar nominee Empire of The Sun.

Jeremy Irons to read Last Post by Poet Laureate, Carol Ann Duffy at Westminster Abbey

Service marks lost WWI generation

Westminster Abbey is to hold a special Armistice Day service following the deaths this year of the three remaining World War I veterans living in the UK.

The Queen will lead the country in observing a two-minute silence at 1100 GMT for the “passing of a generation”.

Bill Stone died at 108 in January followed by both Henry Allingham, 113, and Harry Patch, 111, in July.

The monarch will lay a wreath on the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior and Mr Stone’s daughter will give a reading.

Gordon Brown will also attend along with former prime ministers John Major and Margaret Thatcher, although Tony Blair will be in the Middle East in his capacity as a special envoy.

Actor Jeremy Irons will read Last Post by the Poet Laureate, Carol Ann Duffy, during the service to recognise military and civilian contributions to the conflict.

 

The silence, to be observed around the UK at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, marks the moment four years of war ended with the signing of the Armistice Treaty by Germany and the Allies.

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/uk_news/8353405.stm

Published: 2009/11/11 01:06:04 GMT

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Last Post by Carol Ann Duffy

In all my dreams, before my helpless sight,

He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.

If poetry could tell it backwards, true, begin

that moment shrapnel scythed you to the stinking mud …

but you get up, amazed, watch bled bad blood

run upwards from the slime into its wounds;

see lines and lines of British boys rewind

back to their trenches, kiss the photographs from home –

mothers, sweethearts, sisters, younger brothers

not entering the story now

to die and die and die.

Dulce – No – Decorum – No – Pro patria mori.

You walk away.

You walk away; drop your gun (fixed bayonet)

like all your mates do too –

Harry, Tommy, Wilfred, Edward, Bert –

and light a cigarette.

There’s coffee in the square,

warm French bread

and all those thousands dead

are shaking dried mud from their hair

and queuing up for home. Freshly alive,

a lad plays Tipperary to the crowd, released

from History; the glistening, healthy horses fit for heroes, kings.

You lean against a wall,

your several million lives still possible

and crammed with love, work, children, talent, English beer, good food.

You see the poet tuck away his pocket-book and smile.

If poetry could truly tell it backwards,

then it would.