Jeremy Irons Reads ‘500 Words’ Competition Winning Story

SCROLL DOWN FOR AUDIO PLAYER and photo gallery Jeremy Irons was live on the Chris Evans Breakfast Show on BBC Radio 2, on the morning of 29 May 2015, to read the Gold Medal winning story in the Age 10-13 Category, in the annual ‘500 Words’ writing competition.¬† The ‘500 Words’ short-story writing competition had a record year in 2015, with over 120,000 children entering the competition.

Jeremy read the story It’s a Wide World, by Amabel Smith, age 10.

Video of Jeremy Irons reading “It’s a Wide World” by Amabel Smith

Kenneth Branagh and Jeremy Irons at St. James' Palace

Kenneth Branagh and Jeremy Irons at St. James’ Palace

Other celebrity readers, including Kenneth Branagh, Charles Dance and Eleanor Tomlinson, were on hand to read winning stories.¬† HRH The Duchess of Cornwall invited Chris Evans and the ‘500 Words’ finalists to broadcast live from St. James’ Palace and to attend a reception afterward. The broadcast also featured live music from The Vamps and Will Young.

500Words2015

Click below to listen to Jeremy Irons live on the Chris Evans Breakfast Show:

Listen to the entire Chris Evans Breakfast Show from 29 May HERE.

Read more about the event from BBC.com – Chris Evans announces 500 Words winners

You can read all the finalists, including the six winning stories, on the500 Words website.

500 Words 2015: The Movie

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Jeremy Irons and Max Irons to Participate in Poetry Week at Donmar Warehouse

Poetry Week 
with 
Josephine Hart

30 May – 3 June 2011

Donmar Warehouse
41 Earlham Street
Seven Dials
London WC2H 9LX

UK 

Jeremy Irons will be a reader on Tuesday 31 May and Max Irons will be a reader on Thursday 2 June.

Following the success of her readings for the T.S. Eliot Festival in 2009, Josephine Hart makes a welcome return to the Donmar to produce and direct a week of poetry featuring a series of special readings with some of the country‚Äôs leading actors. She will devote each performance to the works of one or two poets, introducing and setting their poems in the context of their life. ‚ÄúThe idea is simple,‚ÄĚ Hart says, ‚Äúan understanding of the life and philosophy of the poet illuminates the poetry and therefore makes the experience of reading or listening to each poem more intense.‚ÄĚ

Readers  for Poetry Week:

Monday 30 May: Philip Larkin – Too clever to Live? – Charles Dance & Dan Stevens.

Tuesday 31 May: John Milton – Simply Sublime (2.30pm and 7.30pm) Emilia Fox, Jeremy Irons, Felicity Kendal, Dan Stevens.

Wednesday 1 June: Sylvia Plath – The Woman is Perfected – Harriet Walter.

Thursday 2 June: WWI Poetry – The Poetry is in the Pity (2.30pm and 7.30pm) Kenneth Cranham, Rupert Evans, Max Irons, Ruth Wilson.

Friday 3 June: T.S.Eliot – I Gotta Use Words – Harriet Walter & Edward Fox.

Book your tickets by calling (in the UK) 0844 871 7624.

Programme from Josephine Hart Poetry – Robert Browning event

(Thank you to Duncan Lockhart for the following information.)

Here is the list of what was read at the Josephine Hart Poetry Hour at the British Library:

Words That Burn – How to read poetry and why.
Poems of eight great poets by Josephine Hart

Charles Dance, Rupert Evans and Jeremy Irons read Robert Browning

Porphyria’s Lover
My Last Duchess
The Patriot
The Lost Reader
Memorabialia
Home Thoughts From Abroad
How They Brought The Good
New From Ghents To Aix

Then 50 sec of audio of Robert Browning

Pippa Passes
Respectability
You’ll Love Me Yet
Love Among The Ruins
A Light Woman***
A Toccata At Gallupi’s
Andrea Del Sarto

_____________________________________________________________________________________

Jeremy Irons read “A Light Woman” at Browning poetry event:

A Light Woman

I.

So far as our story approaches the end,
Which do you pity the most of us three?—
My friend, or the mistress of my friend
With her wanton eyes, or me?

II.

My friend was already too good to lose,
And seemed in the way of improvement yet,
When she crossed his path with her hunting-noose
And over him drew her net.

III.

When I saw him tangled in her toils,
A shame, said I, if she adds just him
To her nine-and-ninety other spoils,
The hundredth for a whim!

IV.

And before my friend be wholly hers,
How easy to prove to him, I said,
An eagle’s the game her pride prefers,
Though she snaps at a wren instead!

V.

So, I gave her eyes my own eyes to take,
My hand sought hers as in earnest need,
And round she turned for my noble sake,
And gave me herself indeed.

VI.

The eagle am I, with my fame in the world,
The wren is he, with his maiden face.
—You look away and your lip is curled?
Patience, a moment’s space!

VII.

For see, my friend goes shaling and white;
He eyes me as the basilisk:
I have turned, it appears, his day to night,
Eclipsing his sun’s disk.

VIII.

And I did it, he thinks, as a very thief:
“Though I love her—that, he comprehends—
“One should master one’s passions, (love, in chief)
“And be loyal to one’s friends!”

IX.

And she,—she lies in my hand as tame
As a pear late basking over a wall;
Just a touch to try and off it came;
‘Tis mine,—can I let it fall?

X.

With no mind to eat it, that’s the worst!
Were it thrown in the road, would the case assist?
‘Twas quenching a dozen blue-flies’ thirst
When I gave its stalk a twist.

XI.

And I,—what I seem to my friend, you see:
What I soon shall seem to his love, you guess:
What I seem to myself, do you ask of me?
No hero, I confess.

XII.

‘Tis an awkward thing to play with souls,
And matter enough to save one’s own:
Yet think of my friend, and the burning coals
He played with for bits of stone!

XIII.

One likes to show the truth for the truth;
That the woman was light is very true:
But suppose she says,—Never mind that youth!
What wrong have I done to you?

XIV.

Well, any how, here the story stays,
So far at least as I understand;
And, Robert Browning, you writer of plays,
Here’s a subject made to your hand!

Robert Browning


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