Max Irons on dynasties and The White Queen – The Times

Max Irons is featured in The Times from Thursday 15 August 2013.

The full article is for Times subscribers only and can be found HERE.

However, the text of the article can be read on the photos below. Click to enlarge them to full size:

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Max Irons Promotes ‘The Host’

Max Irons stars in The Host, based on the novel by Stephenie Meyer.  The film is in U.S. cinemas on March 29, 2013.

Max Irons, co-star Jake Abel and author Stephenie Meyer were in Miami, Florida on February 18, 2013. for an advance screening of The Host and a Q&A session afterward.  See an album of photos from the event – HERE.

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Max, Jake and Stephenie were also in Coral Gables, Florida on February 19, 2013 at Books & Books for a fan meet-n-greet and autograph session.  See an album of photos from the event – HERE.

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Max and Jake were guests on “Despierta America”…

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Max and Jake were interviewed on Thursday 21 February 2013, on My Fox Atlanta. View the video:

View an album of more photos from the Promotional Tour: HERE.
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Max Irons and Saoirse Ronan on “Good Morning America” Wednesday 27 March 2013.

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http://www.comingsoon.net/news/movienews.php?id=101921

‘Beautiful Creatures’ – Banner, Posters & Trailer

This blog has the International Trailer for Beautiful Creatures

Max Irons – ‘The Host’ Trailer and Video Interviews

Max Irons: On the Set of ‘The Host’

See video of Max on the set of The HostHERE

Text from Dread Central:

MTV News visited the set of Andrew Niccol’s big-screen adaptation of Stephenie Meyer’s first adult novel, The Host, last month and brought back a behind-the-scenes peek at the film along with a few more details about what we can expect when it hits theatres on March 29, 2013.

The Host is the story of Melanie Stryder (Saoirse Ronan), one of the last humans to have avoided capture by an alien race called Souls. The Souls operate more like parasites in that they invade human bodies and erase their personalities. The film follows the unlikely partnership of Melanie and her parasite as they seek out the last of Melanie’s human relatives and her love, Jared (Max Irons). It also stars Jake Abel, William Hurt, and Diane Kruger.

For Ronan, whose character runs down corridors and jumps off tall precipices, her dual roles are a lot more physical than she expected, but she has relished the opportunity to flex those new action-type muscles. For his part, Irons is enjoying the struggle Jared has in wanting to be close to Melanie but knowing in the back of his mind that he can’t. Irons explained. “He wants to hold her, but the rational part of his mind is saying she needs to be killed.”

Author Meyer is involved in the production, and being on the cave sets was particularly magical for her. “It was so awesome. The cave set was enormous, it was vast, they’re just so cool, so much fun to walk on,” Meyer enthused. “It was kind of like someone built something out of your imagination just for you.”

Synopsis:
The Host is a riveting story about the survival of love and the human spirit in a time of war. Our world has been invaded by an unseen enemy. Humans become hosts for these invaders, their minds taken over while their bodies remain intact. Most of humanity has succumbed. When Melanie, one of the few remaining “wild” humans, is captured, she is certain it is her end. Wanderer, the invading “soul” who has been given Melanie’s body, was warned about the challenges of living inside a human: the overwhelming emotions, the glut of senses, the too-vivid memories. But there was one difficulty Wanderer didn’t expect: the former tenant of her body refusing to relinquish possession of her mind. When outside forces make Wanderer and Melanie unwilling allies, they set off on a dangerous and uncertain search for the man they both love.

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Max Irons in ‘The Host’ – First Images and More

People magazine has released some great images of Soairse Ronan and Max Irons from The Host!

Open Road Films has set a March 29, 2013 release date (Easter weekend) for The Host.

Plot synopsis from IMDB.com

Earth has been inhabited by an intellegent alien species known as “Souls.” Although an incredibly peaceful race, Souls can only survive by being inserted into a host body, taking control of their minds. In an effort to discover the secret whereabouts of some of the last remaining human resistances, the Soul Wanderer has been inserted into the human being Melanie Stryder (Saoirse Ronan) , who was captured while attempting to locate her family. After insertion, Wanderer comes to realize an unsettling fact- Melanie has not faded away in consciousness, and in fact is putting up walls in her mind to prevent her family from being found. As time passes and Wanderer tries to break Melanie’s walls, she begins to feel sympathetic toward the humans Melanie loves so dearly- her brother Jamie and her partner, Jared Howe (Max Irons). Wanderer becomes torn between loyalty to her own race, trying to give information to the argumentative Seeker assigned to her, and her blossoming love for the humans in her memories. As Wanderer’s and Melanies trust builds, they embark on a journey through the desert to find the resistance, nearly dying in the process. Wanderer awakens to find herself captive in the den of the enemy, and realizes her problems have just begun: the humans want her dead, the doctor wants to experiment on her, she may have accidentally lead the Seekers here, and she has become hopelessly in love with Jared, the man who belongs to the human she occupies. What follows is an inspiring story of friendship, love, and loyalty in which the bonds of human brotherhood are tested, and an alien discovers that in all the planets in the universe she has experienced, humans are the only race she would give her life to save. .

Max Irons at INC Press Junket in NYC

[Scroll down for photo slideshow and gallery]

By
Sarah Leon via the Stylelist

Max Irons, Model/Actor, Thinks New York Is More Fashionable Than London

“I think New York is more stylish than London,” 26-year-old UK-native Max Irons said Thursday morning, “I think a lot of people [in London] don’t give a shit about what they wear, but when you’re looking out the window of a taxi in New York, there are stylish people everywhere.”

Appropriately, Irons, who is the son of award-winning actor Jeremy Irons, and I were sitting on the 50th floor of the The London Hotel in New York at the time, looking out at the tops of buildings, “It’s only in the past four or five years I’ve started to get in touch with what New York’s really about. I like it, it feels quite like London,” he explains, “Everything’s bigger and faster here, it’s kind of overwhelming. I remember when I was younger because my godmother is from New York, she’s a travel agent, she used to fly me here every summer.”

Irons was in town for a few days to promote his latest gig: the face of Macy’s private label line INC. “I’m happy with them, which is rare thing,” he insists, “I always feel kind of awkward when I look at pictures of myself. Watching videos of myself is really uncomfortable.” The actor/model is surprisingly modest considering he has already appeared in campaigns for Burberry and Mango. Though modeling was never something he set out to do, “When I first got spotted, it was a bit of a shock. I was at drama school and I had no money, so I did it.” Before becoming a model, Irons worked as a bartender at The Ark in Notting Hill, “I was the head barman. I was so bad, but I would go back if I had to. Hopefully I won’t need to.”

We’ll say he’s in the clear. Next, Irons will appear in “The Host,” Stephanie Meyers of “Twilight” fame’s new project. “I haven’t read the “Twilight” books,” he confesses, “But it’s everywhere so I feel like I know it. Edward, Bella, Jacob, etc. but… I haven’t read them. I am a big reader. I loved “The Host,” Stephanie’s a great writer and it’s science fiction which is up my alley.”

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Max Irons Talks About Crushing On Kate Moss, His Love Of Uggs, And More In Our Exclusive Interview – from MTV

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Max Irons Regrets Wearing ‘Psychedelic’ Undies – from People.com Stylewatch
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Interview: Actor Max Irons Dishes on His Modeling Career and His Upcoming Role in ‘The Host’ – from GuestofaGuest.com
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Max Irons Is the New Face of INC International Concepts Spring/Summer 2012 Fashion Campaign

Macy’s has snagged English actor Max Irons to be the new face of its INC men’s collection.

Click for a larger image of the press release:

Irons, who will play the leading male role of Jared in The Host, a film adaptation of Twilight author Stephenie Meyer’s science fiction novel, in 2013, will appear in the brand’s spring 2012 men’s campaign. It will be shot by Walter Chin and styled by Bill Mullen.

A graduate of the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, Irons is the son of Academy Award-winning actor Jeremy Irons, and the grandson of Cyril Cusack. In addition to still images, the INC campaign will include a short video of the actor discussing his personal style and self-expression.

Max Irons in Harper’s Bazaar UK

Red Riding Hood star Max Irons talks to Bazaar’s Stephanie Rafanelli about wolves, nudity and his famous dad

Max Irons and I are playing The Guessing Game; in this case, over the identity of the lycanthrope killer in the 25-year-old actor’s debut feature Red Riding Hood, a gothic thriller adapted from the original fairy tale. So, who is the werewolf? Is it him, Red Riding Hood’s (Amanda Seyfried) betrothed; or the woodcutter she really loves? The suspiciously hairy wolfhunter (Gary Oldman). Or in an implausible twist, Julie Christie, the tales’ sagacious matriarch? “I cooould be the werewolf. I’m definitely a werewolf suspect!” he chuckles, his eyes widening at the mere thought of such a betrayal. “Okay. I’m the werewolf! Red Riding Hood’s the werewolf! Everybody’s the werewolf!”

Tranquil, post-11am roll-up, Irons stares hypnotically into the log fire at Blacks in Soho; his carved cheekbones and distant jade eyes, with the potential to slip into anguish or fervour, a clue to his genetic inheritance (he is the youngest son of thespian heavyweights Jeremy Irons and Sinead Cusack; and the grandson of Cyril Cusack, Julie Christie’s 1966 Fahrenheit 451 co-star). It is a heady cocktail that director Catherine Hardwicke, the woman responsible for Robert Pattison’s appearance in Twilight (spawning mass hormonal surges amongst the global pubescent population), clearly responded to. Especially as her reinvention of the fairy tale, one of the first in a spate of upcoming films, promises to be as rife with smouldering teen eroticism as the hitherto dominant Vampire genre. “I heard that Robert got chased down the street in Paris in his car, before the film even came out. Two black eyebrows rise, sardonically, to form a triangle in perfect symmetry. “I really don’t think it will come anything close to that.”

Though his name recalls a strident comic strip hero, by contrast, he is gently self-effacing (“American actors are all muscular, tanned, white teeth and they have this indestructible confidence. We British are all…Dare I say it? Pessimistic”). He is also somewhat apologetic both for the brands he is sporting (Dior boots, and a Prada Jacket – scruffed beyond recognition) as for his turns as a model, during his drama student years, in Mango (2007) and Burberry’s 2008 ad campaigns. “It was about 7am Saturday morning. I’m living in this basement bedsit with no fucking kitchen and barely a window. Smells of death. My phone goes off and someone says do you want to be shot by Mario Testino with Kate Moss. I didn’t have an agent so I said yup!” He fidgets uncomfortably. “That campaign has haunted me a bit. It has a smell of ‘you’ll do anything to be in front of the camera’.”

Like his father before him, Irons is wary of trading on his looks (the veteran actor rose to fame in The French Lieutenants’ Woman and Brideshead Revisited in 1981 thereafter avoiding being cast as the dashingly decadent love interest) or being hyped by the Hollywood machine. “Actors like Rebecca Hall and Andrew Garfield don’t play the celebrity game. You don’t even know who they go out with. Once you become the story off-screen, you are less likely to be the onscreen one.” But his brief track record already suggests that he is an actor of a similar mould. He received critical acclaim for Tom Stoppard’s Artist Descending A Staircase, and was nominated, alongside Hall, for the Ian Charleson Award in 2009 for his work in Wallenstein at Chichester Festival Theatre. (Hall and Irons became acquainted on tour with Sinead Cusack in Sam Mendes’ the Bridge Project that year: “After the last performance in Greece, everyone went skinny-dipping naked, drinking vodka including my mother I think”)

Puffy-eyed from jetlag from a recent “charm offensive” meeting agents in LA, Irons is on a four-day London stopover (which included presenting a BAFTA’s with Eva Green). A few weeks ago, he bumped into Meryl Streep at the Golden Globes. “I spent time with her when my dad was filming House of the Spirits, and her daughter Gracie and I shared the same tutor. She’d recognised me and came up to me. I was so, so touched.”

Growing up, Irons divided his time between Oxfordshire and his parents stage and film locations; though he was too young to witness his father’s favourite film.“I watched The Mission again on a plane to LA recently and I was in floods of tears. My older brother, Sam, was there, and they spent six months living with the villagers. I mean, Christ – what an amazing time.”

As a teenager his holidays were spent in Country Cork where, in 2000 his father bought and renovated Kilcoe Castle (“Err well it’s more like two towers joined together.”): “He’s become like a local.” He shakes his head.”He does this steeplechase where they stop on their horses at the pub every hour for a pint. Imagine what it’s like at the end of the day. Jumping over huge stone walls, going through rivers. They’re all pissed. It’s crazy.”

With such global adventures under his belt, has he inherited his father’s gung-ho spirit? “I’ve got my dad’s height and smoking habit. But I think I’ve got my mum’s looks and sensibilities.” He smiles warmly. “My dad’s very outspoken. He’ll say what he thinks. We’ve had some fruity political arguments across the kitchen table. They are both quite political, but mum more so. She’s very active [she is president of the Burma Campaign UK] and I seriously love that.” Iron’s half-brother Richard Boyd Barratt is also a political activist, like his biological mother Cusack, with whom he was re-united, around seven years ago, after she gave him up for adoption in 1968. “It wasn’t really that she‘gave him up for adoption.’ He was taken away by the Catholic Church; as was the way in those days, because she conceived out of wedlock.” Irons explains. “It was only in around 2004 when the Irish government ordered the Church to make the details of these adoptions available. I think within a week of that happening they’d been reunited. It’s amazing. And they’re so similar and they get on so well considering they missed 43 years of each other’s lives.”

Such is the rich heritage of Max Irons, filled with moving real life epics as well as thespian and cinema classics: a mighty well from which to draw inspiration in his future acting career (and from Irons’ fledgling projects, one senses there will be a future…). For now, he is adding the finishing touches to Runaways, a six part series for Sky One set in Seventies Soho. “The Italians and Irish gangsters are fighting for control of the sex district. I play this kid who ends up O-Ding nastily on a concoction of cocaine, amphetamines and vodka,” he winces. “But I get to wear flares and kind of woollen tanks tops [laughs]. I’ve got really shit hair though. I had to have a perm!.” He has two secret Hollywood projects in the fire (“If I told you, I’d have to kill you”), after which, Irons is keen to return to the stage. “Donmar. Royal Court. Okay. Put that in.” He leans forward and enunciates into the dictaphone. “I’ll do anything. Naked. Anything! Equus – I’ll do it.” And with that, he quickly pulls out a pack of tobacco, deftly crafts a cigarette (“I’m gagging for one”), before sauntering off into Dean Street. For sure, a roll-up is the only thing Irons need be desperate for right now.

Max Irons in BlackBook Magazine

Read the original article HERE.

Max Irons on Breaking Into Acting, His Famous Parents & Being Discovered by Mario Testino

by Ben Barna

April 8, 2011

When Max Irons turned 17, his parents issued him the following warning: a career in film is brutal, filled with paranoia, jealousy, and financial potholes. They were, he was told, the exceptions to the rule. “Don’t look at us and think it will necessarily be the same for you,” he says, recalling their sound advice. “99.9% of actors are unemployed, or are employed, but not as they’d like. Look at them more than you look at us.” Like any self-respecting teenager, Irons ignored their wisdom. “When they saw I was serious about acting,” he says, “they backed off.” 0digg

Irons’ mother and father, actors Jeremy Irons and Sinead Cusack, have appeared in more than 100 films combined. Now 25 years old and a professional actor, Irons grew up in the theater, with talk around the dinner table often centering on who was likely to win an Oscar that year. “It would be naive to say they had nothing to do with it,” Irons says of the relationship between his famous parents and his own acting ambitions. “I was exposed to it and developed an interest.”

Acting became more than a pastime for Irons when, after a stint at a UK boarding school marked by “smoking, drinking, and girls,” he traveled to Nepal, where he spent six months teaching the craft to street kids. When he returned home, he was accepted to the prestigious Guildhall School of Music & Drama in London, all but guaranteeing himself an agent upon graduation. In Hollywood, however, a young actor also needs looks, and it was Mario Testino who confirmed Irons’ heartthrob potential. The famed fashion photographer stopped Irons on the street and offered him work, a twist of fate that led to his starring in a Burberry campaign opposite Kate Moss.

But it was director Catherine Hardwicke—a connoisseur of smoldering Brits—who gave Irons his true break when the Twilight director cast him in Red Riding Hood, her CGI-enhanced retelling of the classic folktale. As the blacksmith Henry, Irons is one part of a love triangle that features a woodcutter (Shiloh Fernandez) and the title character, played by Amanda Seyfried. As a result, before anyone has even seen his performance, Irons has been busy in meetings with studio bigwigs. Is he ready for his close-up? “You can’t get hypnotized by someone offering you a lot of money or saying they’ll make you famous,” he says. “None of the photo shoots, parties, and flattery means anything. You have to remind yourself that what you do is act, and that’s all that matters.”

Was acting something you wanted to do from a young age?
I’d always tried to get into plays, but I was dyslexic as a kid and so it was kind of difficult, because they’d give you a script and say, Get on stage and do an audition. For a dyslexic kid that’s impossible, it’s a minefield of problems. It took a bit of time before I had the courage to say, Let me go and learn this. And I suppose I was about 15 when I started getting roles, and we have this thing at my school that’s a festival, and I did a play and I just thought, This is as much fun as you can legally have. And then I applied to drama school, which is quite a competitive business in England, and I managed to get it, and it boosted my confidence a little bit. It was a gradual thing, there was no epiphany moment.

Did you grow up watching your parents, and did that have an influence on your decisions?
You know, it’s a funny one, because it’s a double-edged sword. My parents were always gone, and I was always at boarding school, so I didn’t really see what they did actively. I didn’t naturally gravitate toward watching their work, because when I was young it felt weird.

I also read something about Mario Testino plucking you off the street?
I was nineteen and I was coming back from the DVD store with my girlfriend. We always used to have fights at the store, and I was on one side of the street, and she was on the other, and we were yelling at each other when this big, black SUV pulls up and this guy got out and he said, “Hello, I’m Mario.” And I said, “Hello,” and he said, “I’m a photographer and I’d quite like for you to come in for a meeting,” and I said, “Okay, thank you very much,” and he got back in his car and drove off. I thought it was weird, and my girlfriend came across the street and I told her it was a photographer called Mario who looked a bit like Tom Stoppard, and she said, “That’s Mario Testino.” Then I went into meet him and he put me in this Vogue thing, and a couple of months later I did Burberry.

Now that you’re in the movie business, how do you view all the duties that come along with it? Are they secondary?
It’s very interesting and nice that you say that because it kind of is. You have to catch yourself, especially when you find yourself fussing over what to wear to a Vanity Fair shoot, when actually what you do for a living is act. None of the photo shoots and none of the parties and none of the flattery that you receive in interviews mean anything. It’s just hot air and part of a system that’s bigger than you.

Are there any steps you’re going to take to make sure you have a lasting career?
You’ve got to be careful and not being hypnotized by someone offering you a lot of money or saying they’re going to make you very famous. I think also there’s an attitude around Hollywood at the moment of young, disposable talent that kind of turns up, gets shot up with arguably more money than they deserve, and then burn out quickly. And that’s not what you want. Fortunately, I’ve got agents and people around me that are all on the same page.

But essentially the decision is yours to make.
It is, yeah. I got a script to read the other day which was another fairly tale, and I would have been kind of right, but you can’t do it because you’ve just done one, and if you do another one, you’ll be known as that guy. So even though it was a different studio and offered a bit of money, you have to say no sometimes. You have to think in those terms.

Photography by Rene Dupont.

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