Jeremy Irons Attends ‘Made in Britain’ Season Launch

Jeremy Irons attended the launch of the 3rd annual ‘Made In Britain’ season featuring the films of producer Jeremy Thomas at the BFI Southbank on April 3, 2014 in London, England.  Read more about the BFI season HERE.

(Photos by David M. Benett/Getty Images)

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Max Irons in Harper’s Bazaar UK

Red Riding Hood star Max Irons talks to Bazaar’s Stephanie Rafanelli about wolves, nudity and his famous dad

Max Irons and I are playing The Guessing Game; in this case, over the identity of the lycanthrope killer in the 25-year-old actor’s debut feature Red Riding Hood, a gothic thriller adapted from the original fairy tale. So, who is the werewolf? Is it him, Red Riding Hood’s (Amanda Seyfried) betrothed; or the woodcutter she really loves? The suspiciously hairy wolfhunter (Gary Oldman). Or in an implausible twist, Julie Christie, the tales’ sagacious matriarch? “I cooould be the werewolf. I’m definitely a werewolf suspect!” he chuckles, his eyes widening at the mere thought of such a betrayal. “Okay. I’m the werewolf! Red Riding Hood’s the werewolf! Everybody’s the werewolf!”

Tranquil, post-11am roll-up, Irons stares hypnotically into the log fire at Blacks in Soho; his carved cheekbones and distant jade eyes, with the potential to slip into anguish or fervour, a clue to his genetic inheritance (he is the youngest son of thespian heavyweights Jeremy Irons and Sinead Cusack; and the grandson of Cyril Cusack, Julie Christie’s 1966 Fahrenheit 451 co-star). It is a heady cocktail that director Catherine Hardwicke, the woman responsible for Robert Pattison’s appearance in Twilight (spawning mass hormonal surges amongst the global pubescent population), clearly responded to. Especially as her reinvention of the fairy tale, one of the first in a spate of upcoming films, promises to be as rife with smouldering teen eroticism as the hitherto dominant Vampire genre. “I heard that Robert got chased down the street in Paris in his car, before the film even came out. Two black eyebrows rise, sardonically, to form a triangle in perfect symmetry. “I really don’t think it will come anything close to that.”

Though his name recalls a strident comic strip hero, by contrast, he is gently self-effacing (“American actors are all muscular, tanned, white teeth and they have this indestructible confidence. We British are all…Dare I say it? Pessimistic”). He is also somewhat apologetic both for the brands he is sporting (Dior boots, and a Prada Jacket – scruffed beyond recognition) as for his turns as a model, during his drama student years, in Mango (2007) and Burberry’s 2008 ad campaigns. “It was about 7am Saturday morning. I’m living in this basement bedsit with no fucking kitchen and barely a window. Smells of death. My phone goes off and someone says do you want to be shot by Mario Testino with Kate Moss. I didn’t have an agent so I said yup!” He fidgets uncomfortably. “That campaign has haunted me a bit. It has a smell of ‘you’ll do anything to be in front of the camera’.”

Like his father before him, Irons is wary of trading on his looks (the veteran actor rose to fame in The French Lieutenants’ Woman and Brideshead Revisited in 1981 thereafter avoiding being cast as the dashingly decadent love interest) or being hyped by the Hollywood machine. “Actors like Rebecca Hall and Andrew Garfield don’t play the celebrity game. You don’t even know who they go out with. Once you become the story off-screen, you are less likely to be the onscreen one.” But his brief track record already suggests that he is an actor of a similar mould. He received critical acclaim for Tom Stoppard’s Artist Descending A Staircase, and was nominated, alongside Hall, for the Ian Charleson Award in 2009 for his work in Wallenstein at Chichester Festival Theatre. (Hall and Irons became acquainted on tour with Sinead Cusack in Sam Mendes’ the Bridge Project that year: “After the last performance in Greece, everyone went skinny-dipping naked, drinking vodka including my mother I think”)

Puffy-eyed from jetlag from a recent “charm offensive” meeting agents in LA, Irons is on a four-day London stopover (which included presenting a BAFTA’s with Eva Green). A few weeks ago, he bumped into Meryl Streep at the Golden Globes. “I spent time with her when my dad was filming House of the Spirits, and her daughter Gracie and I shared the same tutor. She’d recognised me and came up to me. I was so, so touched.”

Growing up, Irons divided his time between Oxfordshire and his parents stage and film locations; though he was too young to witness his father’s favourite film.“I watched The Mission again on a plane to LA recently and I was in floods of tears. My older brother, Sam, was there, and they spent six months living with the villagers. I mean, Christ – what an amazing time.”

As a teenager his holidays were spent in Country Cork where, in 2000 his father bought and renovated Kilcoe Castle (“Err well it’s more like two towers joined together.”): “He’s become like a local.” He shakes his head.”He does this steeplechase where they stop on their horses at the pub every hour for a pint. Imagine what it’s like at the end of the day. Jumping over huge stone walls, going through rivers. They’re all pissed. It’s crazy.”

With such global adventures under his belt, has he inherited his father’s gung-ho spirit? “I’ve got my dad’s height and smoking habit. But I think I’ve got my mum’s looks and sensibilities.” He smiles warmly. “My dad’s very outspoken. He’ll say what he thinks. We’ve had some fruity political arguments across the kitchen table. They are both quite political, but mum more so. She’s very active [she is president of the Burma Campaign UK] and I seriously love that.” Iron’s half-brother Richard Boyd Barratt is also a political activist, like his biological mother Cusack, with whom he was re-united, around seven years ago, after she gave him up for adoption in 1968. “It wasn’t really that she‘gave him up for adoption.’ He was taken away by the Catholic Church; as was the way in those days, because she conceived out of wedlock.” Irons explains. “It was only in around 2004 when the Irish government ordered the Church to make the details of these adoptions available. I think within a week of that happening they’d been reunited. It’s amazing. And they’re so similar and they get on so well considering they missed 43 years of each other’s lives.”

Such is the rich heritage of Max Irons, filled with moving real life epics as well as thespian and cinema classics: a mighty well from which to draw inspiration in his future acting career (and from Irons’ fledgling projects, one senses there will be a future…). For now, he is adding the finishing touches to Runaways, a six part series for Sky One set in Seventies Soho. “The Italians and Irish gangsters are fighting for control of the sex district. I play this kid who ends up O-Ding nastily on a concoction of cocaine, amphetamines and vodka,” he winces. “But I get to wear flares and kind of woollen tanks tops [laughs]. I’ve got really shit hair though. I had to have a perm!.” He has two secret Hollywood projects in the fire (“If I told you, I’d have to kill you”), after which, Irons is keen to return to the stage. “Donmar. Royal Court. Okay. Put that in.” He leans forward and enunciates into the dictaphone. “I’ll do anything. Naked. Anything! Equus – I’ll do it.” And with that, he quickly pulls out a pack of tobacco, deftly crafts a cigarette (“I’m gagging for one”), before sauntering off into Dean Street. For sure, a roll-up is the only thing Irons need be desperate for right now.

Jeremy Irons signs petition against censorship in Belarus

Prominent arts figures across the country have united by signing a petition calling upon the President of Belarus to respect fundamental human rights and abolish repressive censorship laws. Signatories of the petition include Jeremy Irons.

Index and the Young Vic present “Belarus: Zone of Silence”
10 Nov 2010
Jude Law, Ian McKellen and Sam West take to the stage in support of Belarus Free Theatre

Main House, Young Vic Theatre 5 December 2010

“When people are being kidnapped and killed, then you have to take action to change things in your country”
(Natalia Koliada, co-founder of Belarus Free Theatre).

Index on Censorship presents the internationally acclaimed Belarus Free Theatre (Being Harold Pinter/ Generation Jeans, Soho) at the Young Vic performing the UK premiere of Discover Love with guest appearances by famous names including Jude Law, Ian McKellen and Sam West.

This double bill event, which includes their hard-hitting piece Numbers, takes place just two weeks before the Belarusian presidential election on 19 December. Under the oppressive rule of Alexander Lukashenko, Belarus is one of the world’s least free countries; ranked worse than Iran for press freedom and worse than Zimbabwe for human rights.

Belarus Free Theatre stages underground and uncensored performances to draw attention to the problems faced in Europe’s last dictatorship. Although banned in their home country where they perform in secrecy, this multi award-winning company has established a global reputation of artistic excellence. Their many supporters and patrons include Tom Stoppard, Mick Jagger and Václav Havel.

The last few months have been particularly difficult for BFT with the suspicious death of their close friend and partner, respected journalist Oleg Bebenin — a case that has received widespread international attention. Members of the company have also received death threats and been imprisoned.

This one-off event at the Young Vic is part of Index on Censorship’s campaign to highlight the appalling state of free expression in Belarus and a show of solidarity for BFT from the UK arts community. Prominent arts figures across the country have united by signing a petition calling upon the President of Belarus to respect fundamental human rights and abolish these repressive laws. Signatories include Jeremy Irons, Hanif Kureishi, Juliet Stevenson, Michael Sheen, Katie Mitchell, Neil Tennant, David Lan, Michael Attenborough, Dominic Cooke, Alistair Spalding, Stephen Daldry, Neil Bartlett, Paul Greengrass, Eve Best, Sean Holmes, Michael Morris, Dominic Dromgoole, Ramin Gray, Mark Rubinstein, Daniel Evans, Carrie Cracknell and Natalie Abrahami.

At the Young Vic, BFT will present Discover Love, the powerful and moving love story of Irina Krasovskaya and her husband Anatoli Krasovsky, a supporter of the Belarusian democratic forces who was abducted and disappeared in Belarus in 1999. Numbers is a startling piece using physicality, sound and projections to illustrate statistics detailing the bleak reality of Lukashenko’s oppressive regime.

For tickets and information http://www.youngvic.org 0207 922 2922

 

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Sam Irons’ No Lipstick Private View

Jacobson Space hosted a Private Viewing of its new exhibit ‘No Lipstick’, featuring photographs by Sam Irons.

Celebrities, including Tom Stoppard and Derek Jacobi, were in attendance.

7 September 2010

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Brief Encounter With…Max Irons – from Whatsonstage.com

Brief Encounter With … Max Irons
Date: 10 December 2009

Max Irons is currently making his London stage debut in Tom Stoppard’s Artist Descending a Staircase at the Old Red Lion in Islington.

Born to theatrical parents (Jeremy Irons and Sinead Cusack), 24-year-old Irons has already notched up film credits including Being Julia and Dorian Gray, and earlier this year he appeared on stage in Wallenstein at the Chichester Festival Theatre.

Artist Descending a Staircase, which was written in 1972 as a radio play, was first performed on stage at the King’s Head Theatre in 1988. The current production at the Old Red Lion, under the direction of Michael Gieleta, is its first major revival since then.

What made you decide to become an actor?
I always find that people have these massively romantic reasons for wanting to become an actor. I, unfortunately, don’t. I always wanted to do it, in school while growing up, from being in Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs playing a dwarf onto more serious things. Problem is, I have dyslexia, which is always a bit of a killer on stage. People would hand me a script and say “Read this and act!”, which was a mind-bending idea, and I would start sweating and shaking profusely. As I went on and did more serious things, I would have time to prepare. I did a Neil LaBute two hander, which I enjoyed massively, and I did other bits and pieces at school.

I considered going to drama school, but I wasn’t entirely sure, so I took a gap year and worked with a company in Nepal who taught kids living on the streets – they asked me to teach theatre, which I enjoyed immensely. After that I came home, and over a period of six months I prepared myself for drama school, did my auditions and got offered a place.

You come from an acting family. Was that an encouragement for you or a put off?
To be honest, it was a bit of a put off. It’s a difficult question because I can’t say with a clear conscience that my choice had nothing to do with them. What I mean by that is not that I saw them out there working, making money, having an enjoyable profession, but that I was exposed to theatre and film at an early age. When I saw told my parents that I wanted to be an actor, their first response was “Don’t”. They said “Just because we had a successful career doesn’t mean that the same will apply to you”. I now know, after being in the business for two years and facing rejection, just what they were talking about.

Many actors are going straight to television and film these days, and some are accused of fame-seeking. What’s your take on that?
The business is different to how it used to be. My Dad said “do rep”, and I had to explain to him that it’s hard to come by these days. Celebrity culture, seeking fame and fortune and all that, is definitely out there. To be honest, to be an actor for life requires for steely stuff. You have to have a lot of conviction. If you’re only looking for fame and fortune, you won’t survive.

You’ve done some modelling.
Unfortunately.

How did that come about?
Burberry was the first to approach me. I got a phone call on a Saturday morning from a man saying “we want to photograph you with Kate Moss, and we’ll pay you a bit”. And I thought, ‘well it’s a good experience to cross off your to do list’. And more recently, I worked with Mango, which is another great company. So I put a little bit of money in the bank for when times are bad, and God knows times are bad now.

Are you keen now to mark your territory as a serious actor?
Well, ideally I still need to learn a lot. And the best place to do that is in theatre where you can do it night after night after night. To be honest, I enjoy theatre more than film, but then again, if an interesting part were to come along, I don’t think I would hesitate too much. Beggars can’t be choosers!

What attracted you to Artist Descending a Staircase?
I quite like intimate spaces, and the project seemed really interesting, so with that combination I couldn’t help myself. I worked in Chichester for a while, which I adored. It was in the round, but not nearly as intimate as the Red Lion.

Can you provide an overview of the play?
It’s about three artists who share a studio together and much of their lives together, and still in their 70s are exploring what modern interpretive art can offer. In the middle, there a three scenes when you see the same artists when they were in their 20s, which is where I come in. Mainly I would say it’s about the way these three personalities view the world artistically, but then there’s also a whodunnit element, as two characters pass away during the course of the play. I don’t want to give too much away.

Which character do you play?
I play Beecham, who is the mousiest of the three artists. I think he’s the best at keeping his mouth shut and his eyes open, and seeing the world truly for what it is – which is in stark contrast to many other artists.

What particular challenges are posed by the fact it was originally a radio play?
Well, in terms of staging, there’s a lot of trial and error. Tom’s an incredibly skilled writer, so there aren’t any holes to be plugged, so it’s basically a case of improvising and trying different ways of playing it. Our director Michael (Gieleta) has left a huge amount to us, which is really nice, but what’s also nice is that he’s got a very clear vision of how it should be done. He’s very good at sketching the picture in our heads, and then letting us fill in the gaps.

Why do you think it hasn’t been revived for so long?
I think primarily because it’s a radio play. Plus, a lot of the subject matter is quite hard to handle. I struggled with it at first, because it has a lot of references to various artistic schools of thought. If you don’t know what they’re talking about, it can be very tricky.

What have you got lined up next?
Well, ideally I’d like to do some Chekhov, who is probably my favourite writer. I also hear that David Hare might be doing a production of Ghosts, which is very exciting and another great play. There are various possibilities, but primarily I just want to keep working.

- Max Irons was speaking to Theo Bosanquet

Artist Descending a Staircase, which also stars Jeremy Child, Olivia Darnley, Ryan Gage, Edward Petherbridge, Alex Robertson and David Weston, continues at the Old Red Lion until 31 December 2010.

Reviews and Photo – Max Irons in Artist Descending a Staircase

Artist Descending a Staircase

Old Red Lion, London

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 Artist Descending A Staircase at the Old Red Lion, LondonTom Stoppard’s Artist Descending a Staircase at the Old Red Lion, London. Photograph: Donald Cooper

An elderly painter, Donner, lies dead at the bottom of a staircase while his two studio colleagues argue over the milk order and which one of them is the murderer. Nothing is quite what it seems in Tom Stoppard‘s jolly jape, a ridiculously enjoyable look at memory, love and the arbitrary patterns of life.

Even the deft structure of the play, with its 11 scenes moving initially backwards and then forwards in time, is a joke on Duchamps’s Nude Descending a Staircase. Providing you don’t take the curmudgeonly pronouncements on artistic endeavour to heart, there’s much to give pleasure in this 90-minute piece that is not so much a whodunit as a riff on “how do you see it?”.

The trio of artists in question are Donner, Martello and Beauchamp, three former artistic pranksters who in their youth throw in their lot with the surrealists, but whose real passion is for the beautiful Sophie. Although blind, she is rather more perceptive than the three of them put together. Even so, the unreliability of memory plays a part in the tragedy that unfolds and reverberates down the years. Michael Gieleta’s revival of the play, originally written for radio but transferred seamlessly to the stage, makes a virtue of the cramped space.

It seems odd not to cast a blind actor as Sophie, but that’s not to discredit Olivia Darnley’s performance. And Edward Petherbridge and Max Irons excel as the older and younger Donner, a man destined to see the truth too late.

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Review from The Independent

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Artist Descending a Staircase
Venue: Old Red Lion
Where: Inner London
Date Reviewed: 8 December 2009
WOS Rating: starstarstar
When Tom Stoppard wrote his 1972 BBC play Artist Descending a Staircase, it “had to be” for radio, he says. He subsequently backed down, adding stage directions for a 1988 production mounted at the King’s Head Theatre. And 20 years later, the play returns to Islington, this time for a month’s run at the Old Red Lion. The question is: does it actually work in the theatre?

A murder mystery turned commentary on modern art, it opens with the sound of artist Donner (Stoppard veteran Edward Petherbridge) falling down the stairs of his attic studio – as it turns out, to his death. The incident has been caught on tape by his friend Beauchamp (Jeremy Child), himself an audio-artist, who subsequently points the finger at a third friend, Martello (David Weston) who shares the studio with the other two. Did Donner fall or was he pushed – and if so, by whom and for what reason?

These are the questions that push the play forward, or rather back, as scene by scene, Stoppard rewinds the tape to 1914 when, as adolescents, the three friends find their glorified gap year – a walking trip through France – rudely interrupted by the start of WW1. Both they and the narrative are forced to turn round again but at the centre of their life and art remains beautiful blind girl Sophie (played by a spirited and sensitive Olivia Darnley). And in typically Stoppardian fashion, the play goes on to combine an intellectual discussion of the nature of art with bittersweet observations on love.

Alex Robertson, Ryan Gage and Max Irons are believably cast as the older men’s younger selves, with Irons and Petherbridge in particular projecting the same lyrical melancholy of Donner’s unrequited love, unshaken despite the passing of years. Nevermind his few lines – the younger actor makes even the removal of a scarf completely heartbreaking. But while the veterans have much opportunity for joshing – especially during anecdotes of the great and good of 20th-century art – they are at times a little loose in their banter, dulling some of the writer’s sharper witticisms. The scene jumps also make for some clunky lighting and sound cues, a problem a radio production surely would not face.

Artist Descending a Staircase is not Stoppard’s most sophisticated play, nor is this a perfect production. But just as it contains seeds of his later greatness, it also heralds some exciting new talent in Irons and Darnley. The baton has been passed – and movingly so.

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Max Irons in Artist Descending a Staircase – his London debut!

Tuesday, December 1 at 7:30 PM
Artist Descending A Staircase : Tom Stoppard
at Old Red Lion Theatre, England – London

Henry Filloux-Bennett & Stephen Makin, The Cherub Company, Loaded Hog Productions and Nick Rogers present

Tom Stoppard’s Artist Descending A Staircase 1972. Martello, Beauchamp and Donner – three contemporary artists who have lived and worked together for 60 years. But this afternoon Donner has been found dead at the bottom of the stairs. Was it professional jealously that led to his demise, or a love triangle that spanned six decades? Six actors play the three artists as the search for artistic truth and criminal motive carries us from 1972 to 1914 and back again. Tom Stoppard is one of the most accomplished and acclaimed playwrights working today. His other plays include Rock ‘n’ Roll, Arcadia, The Real Inspector Hound, The Real Thing and Rozencrantz And Guildenstern Are Dead. Cast includes: Jeremy Child (Seperate Lies, Wimbledon, Balmoral), Olivia Darnley (Hayfever – West End, Midsummer Nights Dream – Regent’s Park), Ryan Gage (Hamlet – BBC and RSC, Loves Labour Lost and Midsummer Nights Dream – both RSC), Max Irons (Wallenstein – Chichester, making his London debut), Edward Petherbridge (who created the role of Guildenstern in Stoppard’s Rozencrantz And Guildenstern Are Dead), Alex Robertson (Orestes – Shared Experience), David Weston (King Lear – RSC world tour). Directed by Michael Gieleta
Designed by Nicky Bunch

£13.00-£15.00

 


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Jeremy Irons recited the poem ‘Afterwards’ at service for John Mortimer

Actors, politicians and royalty pay respects to Sir John Mortimer

Celebration of Rumpole creator’s life at Southwark Cathedral one year after lawyer and playwright’s death

Memorial Service for Sir John Mortimer

Detail from the order of service at the memorial service for Sir John Mortimer at Southwark Cathedral.
For a man who did not believe in God, only a cathedral was big enough to accommodate Sir John Mortimer’s many friends and admirers for a memorial service today.

Actually, the event at Southwark Cathedral in London was billed as a celebration of the life of the lawyer, author, playwright, entertainer and wit, who died last January at the age of 85, and that turned out to be more appropriate than a service. The thing about the Church of England is that you don’t have to be religious to get your day in church.

It made for a good house as the performer in him would undoubtedly have acknowledged and, if God was not entirely absent from the proceedings, the biblical readings, prayers, psalms and hymns were outnumbered by readings from the canon of Mortimer himself, declaimed in the most actorly of ways by the likes of Edward Fox, Derek Jacobi and Patricia Hodge. Topping up the bill were Joss Ackland, with a concessionary reading from Ecclesiastes and Jeremy Irons reciting the Thomas Hardy poem Afterwards.

Mortimer was well-known for his defences of artistic free speech as a barrister in court, admired as the playwright of semi-autobiographical works such as A Voyage Round My Father, even more famous as the creator of Rumpole of the Bailey on television and then in novels and latterly celebrated as a raconteur in an indefatigable one-man show – albeit one in which he was invariably accompanied by glamorous women actors. He would have loved the show in the cathedral.

Among the audience – a more appropriate term than congregation – were Mortimer’s widow Penny and children, including daughters Emily and Rosie, both of whom are expecting babies around the anniversary of his death in the new year, the Duchess of Cornwall, and such figures as Tom Stoppard and Peter Hall, Melvyn Bragg, Anna Ford and Peter O’Toole. The former Tory leader Michael Howard came to pay his respects to the old socialist and fellow barrister and there was even a retired bishop, Lord Harries, formerly of the Oxford diocese, in the pews. Lord Kinnock, another old friend and holiday companion, gave the address and Lord Mandelson materialised beside the royal party.

As the service started, wintry sunlight flooded the cathedral, which soon echoed also with music evocative of Mortimer’s lifelong south Oxfordshire home, around the village of Turville Heath. As for the cathedral itself, even that was appropriate, Canon Andrew Nunn said, as it sits just south of the Thames, out of the grasp of the censorious authorities of the City of London and hence surrounded historically by theatres and pleasure grounds, the louche haunt of lawyers and writers out on a spree and the whores who serviced them, known as Winchester geese after the bishop whose writ once ran across the area.

“Please make sure your mobile telephones are turned off and please save any applause for the end of the service,” Nunn added as the performance began. As if to get his retaliation in first he added: “Jesus had more to say about lawyers than any other group in society. He could not stand them, though he may have had a bit more time for Sir John Mortimer.”

Kinnock told the audience that Mortimer had always been a devout unbeliever: “He was in his own words an atheist certainly, but an atheist for Jesus – he liked to say a character without contradictions is like an egg without salt.”

He praised him as a valorous champion for liberty, an opponent of bigotry and a “splendid fulminator”, a friend and admirer of women even though in his own words he had a face like a bag of spanners, and a doting father, including of the son, Ross, who he discovered in his 80s he had conceived 40 years earlier with the actor Wendy Craig.

“He was a day-star of his age,” said Kinnock. “He illuminated our lives, he lit up our times. Rejoice in him and be thankful. The defence rests but his soul goes strolling on.”

Afterwards, the cathedral rang with applause as the service ended, before the more favoured of them filed out to a marquee and to what Mortimer himself described as the unwavering attraction of cold champagne.

 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/culture/2009/nov/17/sir-john-mortimer-memorial-service
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Afterwards

When the Present has latched its postern behind my tremulous stay,
And the May month flaps its glad green leaves like wings,
Delicate-filmed as new-spun silk, will the neighbours say,
‘He was a man who used to notice such things’?

If it be in the dusk when, like an eyelid’s soundless blink,
The dewfall-hawk comes crossing the shades to alight
Upon the wind-warped upland thorn, a gazer may think,
‘To him this must have been a familiar sight.’

If I pass during some nocturnal blackness, mothy and warm,
When the hedgehog travels furtively over the lawn,
One may say, ‘He strove that such innocent creatures should come to no harm,
But he could do little for them; and now he is gone.’

If, when hearing that I have been stilled at last, they stand at the door,
Watching the full-starred heavens that winter sees
Will this thought rise on those who will meet my face no more,
‘He was one who had an eye for such mysteries’?

And will any say when my bell of quittance is heard in the gloom
And a crossing breeze cuts a pause in its outrollings,
Till they rise again, as they were a new bell’s boom,
‘He hears it not now, but used to notice such things’?

Thomas Hardy
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