Jeremy Irons in Geneva to Promote ‘Night Train to Lisbon’

Jeremy Irons was in Geneva, Switzerland on Wednesday 2 October 2013, to promote his film Night Train to Lisbon.

Photo via @patoudoux on Twitter

Photo via @patoudoux on Twitter

Photo via @20Min_ch on Instagram

Photo via @20Min_ch on Instagram

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Photo via @rafaelwolf1703 on twitter

Photo via  via @DariusRochebin on Twitter

Photo via via @DariusRochebin on Twitter

Photo Copyright RTS/Laurent BLEUZE

Photo Copyright RTS/Laurent BLEUZE

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Jeremy Irons Interviewed by Backstage

Original article in German

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Follow Backstage on Twitter: @Baeckstage_ch

Google translated from German:

Jeremy Irons:. “I sing only for friends or at the pub”

On the day of the gala premiere of “Night Train to Lisbon” Oscar winner Jeremy Irons met at the Bellevue Hotel in Bern for an interview. His immense presence was already being felt from a distance. Irons sat on a chair in front of the open balcony doors and smoking a cigarette when I entered the room. Without being asked then, Irons grabbed a chair and placed it next to his and put the receiving device on his right. This rootedness and openness, he also presented in the conversation about the Bernese nightlife. Miscast in his “Night Train to Lisbon” and his role in the TV series “Borgia”

Backstage: What memories do you have of the filming here in Bern last year?

Jeremy Irons: Oh, very happy memories. But short. We were only here for two days. Still, it was wonderful to come to Bern. I knew the city was not before. I also love cities that are located along rivers. I love these big, high bridges here and the architecture of the shops. The arcades are perfect because you despite snow and rain can enjoy the shopping. Yes, I have happy memories of Bern, very happy. And to the people. These certain slowness in Bern and the pleasant pace fascinated me. It stands in stark contrast to London and New York, where everything has to happen very quickly. People there do not have much time for each other. In Bern, this is totally different. Here you have time to chat and that’s very nice.

Backstage: Do you have the novel “Night Train to Lisbon”known before the film?

Jeremy: No, I had only heard of the novel, when I was asked to do the film. Then I read the book and loved it. When I was with the book, suddenly people came up to me and said, “This is my favorite book.” That was very strange, because I’ve never heard of it before. It is a very interesting book. It provides the readers questions like “What are you doing with your life? Is that what you want to do? ‘. These are very important and good questions, I think. I thought that it will be a difficult book to be implemented, since a lot of philosophy is contained therein. But Bille (Director August, editor’s note) has created a very concentrated version, I think, captures the spirit of the book. What is your feeling? How did you find it?

Backstage: Yes, it is a shortened and condensed version, some characters such as Florence or Fatima are not treated, but that does not make a big difference. The essence of the book is there.

Jeremy: Yes, the essence of the book is there, I think so.

Backstage: Some critics have but perhaps struggling with the fact that Gregorius – the hero of the story, which you embody – decides after only 15 minutes of play, to put up in the night train to Lisbon …

Jeremy: Yes, there are some things for which there is not enough time in the film. That’s the problem, you understand me?

Backstage: Absolutely. The film is a different medium than the book.

Jeremy: Exactly, it is a different object. I think it is not in a manner fair to compare the two. But it is legitimate to ask whether the one reflects the essence of the other. It is as if you have a diamond and a picture of the diamond in front of him. There are two completely different subjects, but the painting can give you a feel for the diamond? If it is a good painting, they do so perhaps. Ok, maybe that’s not a good analogy, but you know what I mean, it’s a different medium.

Backstage: Are you an amateur philosopher?

Jeremy: I think so, but I do not spend much time talking about philosophy, but when I stumble across it, I love it. In this way, I’m a little like Gregorius. What fascinates him about Amadeu’s book is, indeed, that he found written down ideas that were lying somewhere in his head. If we come across a book that in a figurative sense speaks our language, share our unformed thoughts, we feel connected to the book. Someone else has solidified our meandering thoughts. And that makes us naturally clear that we share a common humanity. The same fears and concerns. I love historical biographies and read many biographies, I like it noted that other people have encountered in their lives to the same thoughts and problems as I did in mine.

Backstage: What similarities do you have with Gregorius?

Jeremy: We have very few similarities. Every time I drive to work, I get on a night train to Lisbon. I find new people. I love to learn more about other people, explore new places and live in different worlds. So I make my living. But what Gregorius and I have in common is that we are the same (laughs). But we think differently. Although I often think of very boring, like Gregorius.

Backstage: Do you think that they were the right choice for Gregorius?

Jeremy: No, I do not think so. I think we do not see very similar. Gregorius I have a little older, balder and presented uncharismatic. And as an actor I think I have a certain charisma. This I had to suppress it for the role in some ways.

Backstage: Was that difficult?

Jeremy: Hmm, I think the one he needs a little bit of charisma, because it is also a love story and the audience has to be worth watching Gregorius. I hope that one of the reasons why I got the role, the one was that I feel very comfortable here, to play characters who do very little. So that viewers still see the change in him, even if I do not do great things. Through this production, I was reminded of how much can be achieved with small gestures. As an actor, you have to act sometimes less. Instead of playing a lot more you have to think about and somehow it adds also to the outside, as one is perceived. Years ago, I played in a series called “Brideshead Revisited” with. That figure was similar to Gregorius. Charles was a simple man who meets this wonderful aristocratic family and is absorbed by it. He was all the time the observer bringing the audience into the story, she let him feel the same. And so even Gregory does in this movie.

Backstage: You played so Gregorius, although it does not feel right for the character?

Jeremy: If I had a choice to make, I would not have chosen.

Backstage: Who you would cast in Gregorius?

Jeremy: Who I would choose? I do not know … maybe Rush… Anthony Hopkins, Geoffrey and William Hurt …

Backstage: How was it working with Bille August?

Jeremy: Wonderful. I’ve been using for Bille “House of Spirits” worked many years ago, so I knew him. And I liked it, liked the way he works. He is very accurate, fast and he is very polite. On his sets it’s going to always be very cheerful and so forth. He knows what he wants, unlike many directors who filmed everything going on it until the actors are tired and bored with the scenes. Bille has a good flavour, it matches the illustrations in small ways, so that it all fits together and works. You can trust him, so I enjoy working with him. For me there is a better director.

Backstage: And how was it working with the other actors?

Jeremy: Also wonderful because all the actors are very good. Unfortunately, I have not shot with the youngsters, but my God, we were very lucky, just think of Bruno Ganz. Or Martina Gedeck, an actress I’ve seen in “The Lives of Others” and that impressed me greatly. I met her in Budapest when I was there she made ​​a film with Istvan Szabo (The Door, editor’s note). We spent a little time and I really liked her. As they would then suggested for the part of Mariana, I found this fantastic. Charlotte Rampling, is also a good actress, with whom I had previously been worked. And Portuguese actor, whose name I can not remember just not the one who plays the hotel owner. I love him, we had a lot of fun on set. Lena Olin, another leading actress, with whom I played in “Casanova.” When you work with so many good actors, it is so easy to. It really adds to the enjoyment. They were very happy filming, which is rare, but this shoot was really nice.

Backstage: You could also visit very beautiful places …

Jeremy: Absolutely. I love Portugal, but I was the last time for the filming of “House of Spirits” there. But this time around. To a completely different part, in the historic centre of Lisbon, which is very crumbly, romantic and simply wonderful We can shoot for this very lucky, it is not always so nice.

Backstage: Gregory is a teacher at the Bern Kirchenfeld High School. If you were a teacher, what subject would you teach?

Jeremy: Well, I would probably teach drama as this is my job. Strangely, I wish in a way that we would teach all one afternoon a week something. They spend an afternoon, for example, about journalism, or tell about writing. So we could pass our enthusiasm for our work to the children. I think that teachers do a great job with everything they do and how they do it year after year. I think everyone has something in his life that he can pass on to students that to help children gain a better understanding of life. I think this should be something that we offer to the children on a regular basis.

Backstage: Your latest TV production is a series called “Borgias”. Do you think the episode is interesting shape for a performer, because the characters have more and longer time for deployment?

Jeremy: This is the joy, exactly. I have now shot 30 hours of “The Borgias”, which are about 15 films with the same character. The challenges to the rise in screenplays. It is important to ensure that the books are not simply be a repetition of the events in different ways, but the characters are expanded and share an inconsistency that makes it really interesting too. Because we are all just inconsistent and we behave in our being. Shakespeare, for example, was a poet who brought this issue to their best advantage. Characters in movies are usually more stable, less in books where there are more opportunities for inconsistencies. Inconsistency allows it to display an actor depths and the true reality. There is therefore a great privilege for me to play in this series. Alexander is also a very interesting one, an exceptionally broad man, a great administrator, a man of God, but also a man with enormous sensual appetites. Mix all of these facets together to be able to make me a lot of fun.

Backstage: Soon again you come out with a movie, “Beautiful Creatures.” What can we expect?

Jeremy: I was told that the movie to “Twilight” genre is one, but I have “Twilight” is not seen, so I can not say exactly. My son Max has (written by “Twilight” author Stephenie Meyer, editor’s note) is also a movie called “The Host”, which also belongs to this genre. In “Beautiful Creatures” I play the father figure Macon Ravenwood. He is described as incubus, but I’m honestly not quite sure what is meant by an incubus (An incubus is a kind of strange dream-eating demon, editor’s note). He is someone who has been, as it was required of him, as it’s just so many people. The story takes place in South Carolina in the United States. Macon is a man who lives alone and is happy here. A gentleman of great style, wit and knowledge. But the story is basically a love story between two young people.

Backstage: Christopher Lee confessed in an interview today that he’s releasing a heavy metal album.

Jeremy: Did he really?

Backstage: Yes. He is represented with his vocals on it. What about you? Can you imagine for a music album or sing for a musical such as “Les Miserables”?

Jeremy: I think my voice is not good enough for that (laughs). The actors in “Les Misérables” all have an excellent voice. But I used to sing a little when I was younger. In musical theater productions. But when I last sang? (Thinks). I made a recording of “My Fair Lady” with Kiri Te Kanawa, but now it was years ago. Today I sing only for friends or pub.

Backstage: Will we hear you sing today in Bern at a pub?

Jeremy: I’m afraid, but I have not enough time (laughs). Is there really a lot of good music in Bern Local?

Backstage: No, unfortunately there are not that many for himself singing, actually practically not a single good place to eat.

Jeremy: Are you serious?

Backstage: Bern is unfortunately no “Nightlife City” …

Jeremy: So not much of nightlife in Bern? I thought so. I remember when I came here for the first time and then someone asked if Bern is a party town. Having been told the following: “However, we all have a good time here. If it’s nice outside, we sit in front of the cafes and drink “and I was like,” Ok, understood “(laughs).

Bern, Switzerland Premiere of ‘Night Train to Lisbon’

Jeremy Irons was in Bern, Switzerland on Thursday 21 February 2013, for the Swiss premiere of Night Train to Lisbon.

Video of Jeremy being interviewed at the premiere from SRF

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PREESTRENO DE "NIGHT TRAIN TO LISBON" EN BERNA

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‘Night Train to Lisbon’ Premiere and Afterparty

BERLIN, GERMANY – FEBRUARY 13: Jeremy Irons attended the ‘Night Train To Lisbon’ Premiere – BMW at the 63rd Berlinale International Film Festival at Berlinale Palast on February 13, 2013 in Berlin, Germany. (Photos by Franziska Krug/Getty Images for BMW)

Also, Martina Gedeck and Jeremy Irons attended the ‘Night Train to Lisbon’ after show party during the 63rd Berlinale International Film Festival at the Technik Museum on February 13, 2013 in Berlin, Germany. (Photos by Luca Teuchmann/Getty Images for Moet & Chandon)

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13berlinale37 via webmatter on flickr

63rd Berlin Film Festival - Night Train to Lisbon

63rd Berlin Film Festival - Night Train to Lisbon

63rd Berlin Film Festival - Night Train to Lisbon

63rd Berlin Film Festival - Night Train to Lisbon

Berlin International Film Festival Premiere of the movie 'Nicht Train To Lisbon'

Berlin International Film Festival Premiere of the movie 'Nicht Train To Lisbon'

Berlin International Film Festival Premiere of the movie 'Nicht Train To Lisbon'

'Night Train To Lisbon' Premiere At The 63rd Berlinale International Film Festival

'Night Train To Lisbon' Premiere At The 63rd Berlinale International Film Festival

'Night Train To Lisbon' Premiere At The 63rd Berlinale International Film Festival

'Night Train To Lisbon' Premiere At The 63rd Berlinale International Film Festival

'Night Train To Lisbon' Premiere At The 63rd Berlinale International Film Festival

'Night Train To Lisbon' Premiere At The 63rd Berlinale International Film Festival

'Night Train To Lisbon' Berlinale Premiere

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‘Night Train to Lisbon’ Berlinale Photocall

Actor Jeremy Irons, actress Martina Gedeck, director Bille August, actress Melanie Laurent, actor Jack Huston, producer Peter Reichenbach, co-producer Ana Costa and producer Gunther Russ attends the ‘Night Train to Lisbon’ Photocall during the 63rd Berlinale International Film Festival at the Grand Hyatt Hotel on February 13, 2013 in Berlin, Germany.

‘Night Train to Lisbon’ – Stills and Press Release

Official website for the film

Scroll down for the gallery and click on the thumbnails for larger images. Click on Permalink (in the bottom right hand corner of the enlarged image) for the FULL SIZE image.

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Press release:

Jeremy Irons in Portugal

Some photos via Rui Rebelo on flickr

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Video of Jeremy at the press conference in Lisbon, Portugal from RTP.pt

More video of Jeremy at the press conference from Lux.pt

Video from the 15 April 2012 Press Conference from tvi24

Cinebox video interview with Jeremy Irons from http://www.tvi.iol.pt

Night train to Lisbon // Making of // Bille August, Jeremy Irons from Cineuropa on Vimeo.

 

[Scroll down for the gallery. Click on thumbnails for larger images.]

from Cinema.sapo.pt

The first major international film production with the name of the Portuguese capital in the title will debut early next year and will be distributed worldwide, was announced today by producer Ana Costa.

The filming of “Night Train to Lisbon ‘, directed by Danish Bille August , runs from Monday and lasted for the next eight weeks in the local Portuguese capital, in Caxias (Oeiras) and Palmela.

The total investment will be eight million, four million of which will be spent in Lisbon, a co-production between Portugal, Germany and Switzerland, in the capital took place over four days, the only footage of the work outside of Portugal.

The film, which is an adaptation of a novel by Swiss writer Pascal Mercier, will involve a team of 75 people, mostly Portuguese, to tell the story of a Latin teacher in Bern that in the years 1960, reaches Lisbon to find out more about Amadeu de Prado, medical writer and aristocratic Portuguese opposition to the dictatorial regime that was the rage in the country.

The main role is in charge of British actor Jeremy Irons , who returns to work in Portugal, as noted in today’s meeting with journalists, 19 years after having been in the country to run “The House of Spirits’ , also directed by August and based on the novel’s namesake Chilean author Isabel Allende.

Irons said that it is a “history of discovery, mystery and adventure.”

Actors Nicholas Breyner and Beatriz Batarda are some of the Portuguese who are also part of the cast, which also includes the representation of Melanie Laurent (France), Jack Huston and Tom Courtenay (UK), August Diehl (Germany) and Bruno Ganz ( Switzerland), among others.

Ana Costa, CineMate the producer, said: “Night Train to Lisbon” will be the movie that will have the largest financial support from the European fund Eurimages, whose value is not specified.

He also stressed the investment in the current context of crisis, the film will bring to Lisbon, where inject four million euros during the period of filming.

The city of Lisbon is among the sponsors of the work, such as the Institute of Cinema and Audiovisual (ICA). Since the Fund for Cinema and Audiovisual (FICA) gave no financial contribution, despite having signed a contract to that effect, fails to Ana Costa attributed to the fact that this institution be “frozen” since 2008.

This investment would make even more sense for the movie has already secured the display abroad, in charge of the German distributor K5. In Portugal this role will be assumed by ZON Audiovisuals.

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from c7nema

The British actor arrived today (18) to the Portuguese capital for the start of filming of his new album, “Night Train to Lisbon” (“Night Train to Lisbon ‘). Accompanied by director Bille August and the film makers, the press Irons presented the project, which will be filmed almost entirely in Lisbon in the next seven weeks. It is the second time the two worked together in Portugal: in 1993 they filmed in Alentejo “The House of the Spirits.” The shooting started last week with four days of filming in Bern, Switzerland.

Based on the novel by Pascal Mercier Swiss, “Night Train to Lisbon” chronicles the life of a quiet Latin teacher, Raimund Gregorius, who lives in Bern. Encased in a routine life, Gregorius takes the unexpected decision to enter a train to Lisbon without an apparent reason – after going to the station to deliver the jacket lost a young man who saved him from suicide.

He then found in his coat pockets a book by a Portuguese writer, Amadeo de Prado. Intrigued by the book and its author, decides to conduct a survey in Lisbon on the life of Amadeo de Prado, a physician active in the resistance anti-Salazar. At the same time, it will rebuild your own life from another perspective.

According to Irons, what is interesting in the character is just the fact that he has total control over your life and in an instant, after an unexpected act, adopt a measure that completely strip the usual way – until I realized that after this process became a different man.

The actor also had high praise for Portugal. Recalling his stay in another country, said the magic that is a different atmosphere here. “What I remember is I loved Portugal,” he said. Irons revealed that has not had much time to learn about the period of the dictatorship of Salazar, at which time it becomes part of history. He quipped that just came out of a project based on Henry IV, Shakespeare, and he had to learn a lot about him.

Bille August has already revealed that he was attracted by the prospect of extraordinary events when they occur in the lives of ordinary people – questioning how much change is or is not within reach of each one. The director did not fail to emphasize the fact that the story was passed in Lisbon was an important factor in its decision to immediately accept the proposal of the German producer Studio Hamburg, without even reading the first version of the argument. August also said he was thrilled to return – and that the major effort will be trying to capture on film the magic and mystery of the capital Lisbon.

As in “The House of the Spirits”, August surrounds himself with a large international cast. In addition to Irons, Melanie Laurent, Lena Olin, Charlotte Rampling, Bruno Ganz, Jack Huston, Martina Gedek, August Diehl and Christopher Lee completes the main cast. On the Portuguese side, especially Nicholas and Beatrice Breyner Batarda.

The film and the difficulties of Portuguese cinema

“Night Train to Lisbon ‘will cost £ 7.7 million. In addition to producing German, Swiss and C-Films CineMate by the Portuguese side, co-produce the film. It will be launched in 2013, distributed by Zon Lusomundo in Portugal and abroad by German K5.

The co-producer of the Portuguese side, Ana Costa, stressed the importance of a project size international prestige for the dissemination of Lisbon in the world. “It’s the first time a work of this size takes its name from Lisbon in the title,” he said. About 90% of the film will be shot in Lisbon, with a few more scenes in Caxias and Palmela – beyond those already filmed in Bern. Costa estimates that around £ 3.5 million will be spent in the capital with the filming of the movie. This information reinforces the idea defended by a representative of Studio Hamburg, Russ Günther, that any funding of cinema in Portugal, particularly the state should see it, not as entertainment but as an economic activity generating resources for the country – and co-productions are good solutions for the continuation and funding of Portuguese cinema in times of crisis.

The other studio representative, Kerstin Ramcke, gave information about the project, which already takes six years. First came the difficulties of transposition of the book to film, since it is largely focused on philosophy. Then were the obstacles inherent in a large production, with the search for co-producers and sponsors. The filmmaker Bille August has given its OK for two years and Irons confirmed their participation after one year.

Mercier’s book, already translated into Portuguese, was a major bestseller in German in recent years.
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JEREMY IRONS PRAISES PORTUGUESE CUISINE, LANDSCAPES AND MUSIC

(TRAVPR.COM) USA – April 13th, 2012 – Actor Jeremy Irons, who is in Lisbon filming the movie “Night Train to Lisbon,” yesterday praised the quality of Portuguese cuisine, the “magic” of the Fado music and the beauty of the nation’s landscapes.

During a dinner aboard the Portuguese Navy’s historic tall ship Creoula, in the presence of Secretary of State for Tourism, Cecilia Meireles, Irons referred to Lisbon as a “unique place” in Europe, combining hills, small cobbled streets, preserved heritage and a unique luminosity.

During filming in Portugal, the cast has had the opportunity to enjoy a night of Fado music which left Jeremy Irons surprised with this truly Portuguese musical genre, and with the voices of a new generation of artist: “It was three quarters of an hour absolutely magical and unbelievable”.

Moreover, Irons pointed out his passion for Portuguese cuisine: “The fish you eat here (in Portugal) is just fantastic! I would live here just because of the fish”. He was surprised to hear that many internationally renowned restaurants, including ones in New York, only serve fish caught in Portugal.

Accompanied by the other stars from the movie (Bruno Ganz and Charlotte Rampling) Irons also referred to the beauty of the beaches on the Alentejo coast, one of the locations where the movie takes place. In addition, he is interested in the unique relationship between Portugal and the sea with more than 400 miles of coastline and where some of the most beautiful beaches in Europe are found.

Pascal Mercier’s novel “Night Train to Lisbon” is the basis of the film by Danish director Bille August, being shot take in Lisbon until May 2012.

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