Jeremy Irons in ‘Cigar Aficionado’ Magazine

Jeremy Irons is featured in the March/April 2013 issue of Cigar Aficionado magazine.

This magazine is a must own for any Jeremy Irons fan. Be sure to buy a copy at your local news stand, book seller or cigar store.

Here are scans and photographs of the magazine. Click on the thumbnails to enlarge the images and read the text.

All images © Cigar Aficionado Magazine [Text by Marshall Fine - Portraits by Jim Wright] No copyright infringement intended.

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Emmys 2012: Jeremy Irons is the Original Mob Boss (Q&A)

From The Hollywood Reporter

The actor channels his innate “touch of melancholia” to create an addictive crime-family patriarch in Showtime’s epic drama “The Borgias.”

11:44 AM PDT 6/6/2012

by Marisa Guthrie

This story first appeared in the June 2012 Special Emmy Issue of The Hollywood Reporter.

A rainy April afternoon in New York finds Jeremy Irons, 63, chain-smoking hand-rolled cigarettes (he buys the tobacco at airport duty free shops) in his suite at the Upper East Side boutique Lowell Hotel. He is enjoying a moment away from his peripatetic work schedule: In addition to playing the lead on Showtime’s The Borgias, which shoots in Budapest, the British Oscar winner (Reversal of Fortune) also has completed work on Bille August’s Night Train to Lisbon, shot on location in Portugal, and is shooting Richard LaGravenese’s Beautiful Creatures in New Orleans. With his signature candor, Irons shares his take on the “bullshit” of fame, how a revealing dinner at the Vatican prepped him for his role as Renaissance Pope Rodrigo Borgia and the two American actors who have intimidated him.

The Hollywood Reporter: What drives you to keep working?

Jeremy Irons: It’s a bit of a drug. But it’s important that you have a very strong life with other passions that counter balances the work so that you know why you’re working. Fame and success are valueless. We have a culture where everybody wants to be famous. And you think, why? Because we’re being told that will bring happiness. And it’s all bullshit. Admittedly, it’s very nice wandering down the street and people saying, “Hi, love your work”; and going into a restaurant and people saying, “Oh, we’ll find you a table.” The whole world’s your village. But you have to put up with everybody wanting to know your business.

THR: How long do you see yourself playing Rodrigo Borgia?

Irons: I ask myself that every day. And I ask [creator and executive producer] Neil Jordan that every day. When they originally asked me to do it, they said, “Listen, it might run for four years.” And I gasped! But Neil is a filmmaker. So in a way, he’s educating himself to write for television. This makes the series a little slower than Showtime would like. But we’ve picked it up a bit, shorter scenes and more [snaps fingers] in season two.

THR: Do you like Borgia as a character?

Irons: You can’t play someone and not like him. You are inside him, and they are you. I like Borgia’s appetite; I like that he eats life, won’t take shit and that he has flaws. He’s not a good guy, he’s not a bad guy, he’s a guy. He’s power hungry; he doesn’t want to waste his time in this life. I share that with him. I’m not power hungry, just easily bored and want to make the most of the four score years and 10, if I’m lucky, while I’m on the planet.

THR: I read somewhere that when Borgias started shooting, you had dinner with an archbishop. What was that experience like?

Irons: Yes, it was at the Vatican. When he asked me in the door, he said, “You are now safe; no one can get you here; you are diplomatically immune.” I thought, “Well, that’s nice to know; I’ll put that address in my book.” We shared a bottle of wine in his kitchen, which was pretty spartan. And around 11 o’clock, we went to the roof to have a cigarette, and he pointed over the rooftops to a cell of lighted windows and said, “There’s Rodrigo Borgias’ modern counterpart; he’s still awake, doesn’t sleep much, sits and plays his piano.” Then we went downstairs, by which time [the archbishop’s] mistress had arrived.

THR: You’re allowed to have a mistress in the Vatican?

Irons: It would seem so.

THR: Who was this person?

Irons: It would be wrong to mention names. But all I can say is that nothing really has changed. We now think that the pope is next to God. Well, in those days the pope was head of the Church but behaved as any man would behave — or most men would behave.

THR: Are you Catholic?

Irons: Not really. I was baptized Church of England. My children are Catholic; my wife is Catholic. But I’m not really a club member, never have been. I go to Mass because I enjoy times of reflection. But I’m not a regular at all.

THR: How pigeonholed have you felt as an actor?

Irons: You’re always pigeonholed a bit. I do play the occasional American character, but I’m thought of as an “English actor.” I’m tall, slim and do bring a certain thing. You can’t get away from that. I’m never going to be cast as a sort of Danny DeVito character.

THR: Well, you have done a few projects with comedic elements.

Irons: Glad you’ve noticed! I seem to be known as enigmatic: Is he good, is he bad? Can we trust him, or is he just evil?

THR: But certainly no one has accused you of being Mr. Sunshine.

Irons: No, but I can show you a few films where I was Mr. Sunshine — although there’s always a touch of melancholia. I try not to put my feet in the footsteps that I’ve been in before. All actors have a certain smell. You can say that’s a Jeremy Irons role, that’s an Al Pacino role, or that’s a De Niro role. My biggest competition for roles is maybe Alan Rickman, in a way, or Bill Hurt. It’s all about the work you’ve done that adds up to your aroma.

THR: You’ve worked opposite fellow Oscar winners Meryl Streep, Kevin Spacey and Helen Mirren. Do better actors make you better?

Irons: Yes. It’s like tennis; it ups your game if you have someone playing good tennis against you.

THR: Have you ever been intimidated by one of your co-stars?

Irons: De Niro used to intimidate me. He doesn’t give any quarter, but he’s mellowed now. And Al Pacino is quite intimidating.

THR: Any leading ladies?

Irons: Intimidated me? No.

Email: Marisa.Guthrie@thr.com; Twitter: @MarisaGuthrie

Jeremy Irons Joins ‘Beautiful Creatures’

From the Hollywood Reporter , Deadline.com and exclusive information from jeremyirons.net

Jeremy Irons has joined the cast of Beautiful Creatures, Alcon’s adaptation of the young adult novel by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl.

Jeremy Irons is the most recent in a flurry of casting announcements, joining Viola Davis (Amma), Emma Thompson (Mrs. Lincoln/Sarafine), Emmy Rossum (Ridley), Thomas Mann (Link) and relative newcomers Alden Ehrenreich (Ethan) and Alice Englert (Lena).

Ehrenreich and Englert are the centerpieces of the coming-of-age story about two star-crossed teens – one a local boy, the other a mysterious new girl – who uncover dark secrets about their families, their history and their town.

Jeremy will play the role of Macon Ravenwood, the mysterious and reclusive uncle of Englert’s character. Macon is an incubus who can see and steal the dreams of others.

Erwin Stoff (Water for ElephantsI Am Legend) will produce along with Kosove and Johnson (The Blind SideThe Book of Eli) and Molly Smith (Something Borrowed, P.S. I Love You.)

Filming begins in April 2012 in and around New Orleans.  Jeremy will likely be on set from approximately April 19 to June 23, after he finishes filming Night Train to Lisbon and before starting production on Season 3 of Showtime’s The Borgias.

Richard LaGravenese (P.S. I Love You) will direct from his adaptation.

Alcon, which has film rights to all three books in the series published by Little Brown Books, including Beautiful Darkness, and Beautiful Chaos, is looking at Beautiful Creatures to kick off a possible franchise at WB.  A fourth book, Beautiful Redemption, will be released October 23, 2012.

Alcon recently produced the hit Dolphin Tale, a 3-D family film starring Morgan Freeman, Harry Connick Jr., Ashley Judd and Kris Kristofferson.

Irons is repped by CAA and Ken McReddie Associates.

Jeremy Irons currently stars in Showtime’s period drama The Borgias, which returns for a second season on April 8, 2012. Film-wise, he was last seen in Margin Call and will next been seen in CBS Films’ The Words, which also stars Bradley Cooper. Other future films of Jeremy’s include BBC’s Henry IV: Parts 1 & 2 and Night Train to Lisbon.

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