Jeremy Irons at ‘Trashed’ Screening in Kingston

Jeremy Irons attended a screening of his film Trashed, at the Tiffin Boys School in Kingston Upon Thames, Surrey, UK, on Friday 18 October 2013.  He participated in a Q&A session, after the film.

The screening was organised and hosted by Zac Goldsmith, MP for Richmond Park and North Kingston.

Photo via @qcrescent on Twitter

Photo via @qcrescent on Twitter

Photo via @nicjnic on Twitter

Photo via @nicjnic on Twitter

Photo via @BlueFoxCAFH on Twittter

Photo via @BlueFoxCAFH on Twittter

Photo via @GreenUponThames on Twitter

Photo via @GreenUponThames on Twitter

Photo via @kewgreen on Twitter

Photo via @kewgreen on Twitter

Photo via @ChristineElmer on Twitter

Photo via @ChristineElmer on Twitter

Photo via @qcrescent on Twitter

Photo via @qcrescent on Twitter

Photo via @GreenUponThames on Twittter

Photo via @GreenUponThames on Twittter

Photo via @tabacaria on Twitter

Photo via @tabacaria on Twitter

Jeremy Irons to attend ‘Trashed’ screening in Kingston, Surrey

Jeremy Irons will be at the Tiffin Boys’ School in Kingston-on-Thames, Surrey,  on Friday 18 October 2013, at 7:30pm, for a special showing of Trashed

trashed 4 image

He will be taking questions from the audience after the film.

Address: Tiffin School, Queen Elizabeth Rd, Kingston-upon-Thames, Surrey KT2 6RL, United Kingdom

The event will be hosted by north Kingston and Richmond Park MP Zac Goldsmith.

The event is free but tickets will be allocated on a first come first served basis.

To reserve a seat, email zac@zacgoldsmith.com

Read the press release on Zac Goldsmith’s website.

Heal the Bay honors Jeremy Irons at Bring Back the Beach

Heal the Bay honored Jeremy Irons at their 2013 Bring Back the Beach gala, for his contribution to the short film The Majestic Plastic Bag.

Jeremy Irons at New York Times Energy for Tomorrow Conference

Jeremy Irons was a featured speaker at the New York Times Energy for Tomorrow Conference in New York City on Thursday, April 25, 2013.  He was interviewed by New York Times columnist Andrew Revkin about the film Trashed.

The New York Times Energy for Tomorrow conference featured Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s Food Waste Challenge announcement, where the Mayor talked for the first time about the City program with more than 100 restaurants to reduce organic waste sent to landfills; and a talk with Academy Award-winner Jeremy Irons on his documentary, “Trashed,” and the steps we can take in our daily lives to reduce waste.

You can watch the entire conference, broken up by panel, on demand at www.NYTEnergyforTomorrow.com.

Visit Andrew Revkin’s Dot Earth blog to see video of Jeremy at the conference and read more from Andrew Revkin.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Jeremy Irons on BBC News ‘Hard Talk’

Jeremy Irons was a guest on the BBC News programme Hard Talk. The programme first aired on BBC News on April 15, 2013.  Check HERE for iPlayer availability.

Jeremy Irons – Actor and Campaigner

Duration: 30 minutes

Stephen Sackur meets one of Britain’s most successful actors, Jeremy Irons. The Oscar winning performer is best known for his portrayal of troubled, brooding upper class men. He has just finished making a documentary about the potentially devastating impact of the mountains of toxic waste polluting our planet. He is an actor with very strong opinions.

hard talk 1 hard talk 2 hard talk 3 hard talk 4 hard talk 5 hard talk 6 hard talk 7 hard talk 8 hard talk 9 hard talk 10 hard talk 11 hard talk 12 hard talk 13

‘Trashed’ Screenings at Documentary Edge Festival NZ

Trashed will be screened as part of the Documentary Edge Festival in New Zealand.

documentary edge festival logo

Times and locations are as follows:

Sunday 14 April  6:45 pm at the Q Theatre in Auckland, New Zealand  BOOK TICKETS

Friday 19 April 1:15 pm at the Q Theatre in Auckland,New Zealand  BOOK TICKETS

Sunday 12 May 6:30 pm at the Reading Cinemas Courtenay in Wellington, New Zealand

Friday 17 May 1:45 pm at the Reading Cinemas Courtenay in Wellington, New Zealand

 

 

Jeremy Irons to Attend ‘Trashed’ Screening in Brussels, Belgium

Source

LOGO CE_Vertical_EN_quadri

The event:

What: 12.30 Joint press conference by European Commissioner for Environment, Janez Potočnik and Jeremy Irons, Narrator and Executive Producer the documentary film Trashed.

The launch will be followed by the projection of the film Trashed in the European Parliament.

When: Thursday 7th March 2013

Where: Berlaymont Press Room, in Brussels
———————————————————————————

The news:

The European Commission is publishing a Green Paper on plastic waste to launch a structured discussion about how to make plastic products more sustainable throughout their life cycle and reduce the impact of plastic waste on the environment. The current EU environmental legislation doesn’t specifically address the particular challenges posed by plastic waste. The Green Paper aims to collect facts and stakeholders’ views on the impacts of plastic waste and a way of mitigating them through a European strategy. The consultation consists of 26 questions and will last until end of May 2013. The result will feed into further policy action in 2014 as part of a broader waste policy review, which will look in particular at the existing targets for waste recovery and landfill as well as an ex-post evaluation of five directives covering various waste streams.

The background:

Once in the environment, particularly in the marine environment, plastic waste can persist for hundreds of years. Up to 10 million tons of litter, mostly plastic, end up in the world’s oceans and seas annually, turning them into the world’s biggest plastic dump. The presence of plastic residues, even in the most remote areas of world seas and shores shows that there is a price to pay for unhampered proliferation of plastic waste. Conventional plastic also contains a large number, and sometimes a large proportion of chemical additives which can be carcinogenic, provoke other toxic reactions or act as endocrine disruptors.

Jeremy Irons to be Honored by Heal the Bay

Source

heal the bay logo

Jeremy Irons Voices the Fight Against Plastic Pollution

On May 16, Heal the Bay honors three supporters who’ve lent their formidable voices to protecting the ocean from plastic pollution at our annual benefit gala Bring Back the Beach.

In 2010, Oscar-winner Jeremy Irons narrated our mockumentary “The Majestic Plastic Bag”, lending gravitas to the story of a single-use plastic bag as it migrates to the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. The film screened at the Sundance film festival and remains popular on the film festival circuit. To date, The Majestic Plastic Bag has been viewed more than 1.8 million times on Heal the Bay’s YouTube channel.

We honor Jeremy Irons, not merely for sharing his rich, haunting voice with us, but for his ongoing work to stop the proliferation of trash. In his new feature documentary “Trashed: No Place for Waste,” Irons takes a different journey, this one following the migration of rubbish, the tons of waste that goes unaccounted for each year. Irons serves as the film’s chief investigator as well as the executive producer.

Heal the Bay will also honor our longtime champion Mark Gold for his years of laser-like focus and tireless advocacy in support of clean water. Mark was Heal the Bay’s first employee and served with our organization for 25 years, leading and inspiring our work as our executive director and president. He continues to support us as a researcher, fundraiser and board member. We can count on Mark as a sounding board, resource and guiding force as we tackle future attacks on clean water.

Philanthropist Dr. Howard Murad will be honored on May 16 for raising awareness for environmental issues and causes. Employees from Dr. Murad’s skincare company Murad, Inc. have joined us on numerous beach cleanups, as well as solidly supporting our efforts in curtailing marine debris.

You’re invited to join our celebration of these eco warriors on May 16, 2013 at the Jonathan Beach Club.

‘Trashed’ DVD Release Date

Trashed will be released on DVD (Region 2) on April 22, 2013.

Pre-order your copy from Amazon.co.uk

trashed film logo 2

Product details:

Actors: Jeremy Irons
Directors: Candida Brady
Format: PAL, Widescreen
Region: Region 2 (This DVD may not be viewable outside Europe)
Number of discs: 1
Studio: Blenheim Films
DVD Release Date: 22 April 2013
Run Time: 97 minutes

Review
TRASHED- 5 stars – New York Daily News – Jeremy Irons takes us through a tour of the world s grotesque garbage consumption and failure to dispose of its trash, which inspires horrified reactions from both him and us. This is appalling , our Oscar-winning guide says, sitting on a debris-strewn beach in Lebanon. Seem bleak? It s supposed to, as director Candida Brady uses a thriller-ish tone to show the state of the planet. And if facts about 150 years of plastics, dioxins and dangerous castoffs don t jolt you, a visit to a hospital for malformed children will. Yet for all the poisonous truths in Trashed, there are also solid grass-roots solutions that, as presented, feel do-able and politically digestible. That helps, because everything Irons finds puts you off food. Crucial viewing for realists and alarmists both. –http://www.laweekly.com/movies/trashed-1494726/

This is appalling, says the actor Jeremy Irons, surveying a reeking mountain of consumer waste fouling a once glorious beach in Lebanon. That spoiled shoreline is only one of many revolting sights in Trashed, Candida Brady s down-and-dirty documentary about our inability to neutralize safely much of what we throw away. Taking us on a global tour of escalating rubbish and toxic disposal options, Ms. Brady rubs our faces in the poisonous consequences of littering the planet with substances that, like bedbugs and French mimes, are almost impossible to get rid of. But if we must talk trash, Mr. Irons assisted by a scientist or two and Vangelis’s doomy score is an inspired choice of guide. Soothing and sensitive, his liquid gaze alighting on oozing landfills and belching incinerators, he moves through the film with a tragic dignity that belies his whimsical neckwear and jaunty hats. Every sterile whale and plastic-choked turtle is a dagger in his heart (and will be in yours too), to say nothing of the farmers ruined by chemically contaminated livestock. By the time Mr. Irons visits a Vietnamese hospital for children with severe birth defects the legacy of Agent Orange that plastic water bottle in your hand will feel as dangerous as a Molotov cocktail. –www.nytimes.com

The world is in a heap of trouble — make that heaps: giant, toxic mountains of garbage that endanger our oceans, marine life, the atmosphere and humanity in general — without an end in sight. That is, unless citizens, industry and governments get deadly serious about such solutions as mass recycling, composting, plastics reduction and more. Such is the global crisis that’s vividly, relentlessly detailed in the vital documentary starring dulcet-voiced zero waste advocate, actor Jeremy Irons. Guided by writer-director Candida Brady, Irons (genial, studious) travels the globe visiting some of the most egregious, noxious examples of trash disposal and waste mismanagement; vast, open-air garbage dumps in Lebanon and Indonesia that infect its waterways and coastlines are particularly horrendous. It’s not a pretty picture, to say the least, with a stop in Vietnam to examine birth defects linked to wartime Agent Orange spraying proving a deeply grim offshoot of the film’s central thrust. Then there’s the garbage calamity’s most insidious culprit: non-recycled, non-biodegradable plastic. The movie, as have other eco-documentaries, chillingly examines how endless bits of the toxic material routinely flood our oceans, harm its inhabitants and find their way into the fish we eat. Scientists, doctors and academics weigh in as well, though flipside input from corporate interests and government policymakers would have added welcome dimension to this crucial discussion. –www.latimes.com/entertainment/movies/moviesnow/la-et-mn-trashed-capsule-20121214,0,7515915.story

Q. and A.: Jeremy Irons and ‘Trashed’ from The New York Times

Q. and A.: Jeremy Irons and ‘Trashed’
By JOANNA M. FOSTER
Read the original post HERE.

Green: Living

A new documentary about the ultimate fate of just about everything we lug home from the mall opens on Friday in limited release in the United States. “Trashed,” directed by Candida Brady and starring Jeremy Irons, delves into the less festive side of consumerism and waste disposal — overflowing landfills in England, a toxic trash incinerator in Iceland, a hospital for children with birth defects in Vietnam.

We sat down recently with Mr. Irons to talk trash. Following are excerpts, edited for brevity and clarity.

Q. “Trashed” opens with a powerful image from Lebanon of a mountain of trash stacked high next to the ocean. Can you describe what it was like sitting on that trash mountain?

A. It was appalling. I’ve never been so grateful to leave the “set” of a film. It is certainly something to look at, but what people who see the film don’t experience is the smell of dead animals and wafting chemicals that make you gag. There are flies and fleas everywhere, stray dogs tripping over rubbish and yapping furiously at the scavenging birds circling overhead.

What really made my stomach turn was watching the steady stream of evil-looking runoff oozing from the bottom of the mountain of garbage straight into the sea. It looks and smells like poison, and there are still fishermen out there, although far fewer than there used to be.

What fish they do catch certainly aren’t eating what you or I would care to eat. It was all just horrific, but what’s happening there is what happens if you do nothing, and it’s an illustration of what we are all doing only they haven’t bothered to hide it.

Q. Has making “Trashed” led you to change any of your personal habits?

A.Yes. And I don’t consider myself an environmentalist or activist — I’m hardly an expert on green living. But what I’ve started doing since making the film is that I take packaging off at the point of purchase.

I consider myself quite capable of getting my tomatoes home safely without sitting on them, so why must they come packaged in plastic armor? And I think I can even get a pair of scissors home without chopping off my hand so I really don’t need that damned impenetrable plastic shell.

So I take it off and leave it on the counter and ask the person who sold it to me to deal with it themselves, because I didn’t want it in the first place. That way we push it back toward the manufacturers because the supermarkets will say: “Look, we can’t deal with all of this. Can you please provide less or take it back and reuse it?”

Q.How do you think waste compares with climate change as an issue? Shouldn’t trash be an even more obvious problem that no one can dispute?

A.It seems pretty obvious when you see a landfill or a the insides of a seabird bursting with plastic fragments. But so much of that is so removed from our everyday lives that it’s a bit like climate change and Bangladesh — out of sight, out of mind.

And just like there are those who dispute the scientific evidence behind climate change, there are those who argue there is no connection between environmental toxins and health. In the documentary we talk to villagers in France living near an incinerator who saw cancer rates spike in their community. They took the government to court over it and were told that there was no proof of any connection. Just like some of the effects of climate change, some of these health effects are still down the pipeline.

Finally, there’s also a lot of money in trash, as there is in the fossil fuel industry. In places like New York, it’s not just a lack of organization that results in so little being recycled, it’s also that there is a huge amount of money in trash disposal. The people who are getting rid of our waste at the moment have a fine industry and have no incentive to change that.

Q.What practical steps would you recommend to anyone who sees “Trashed” and wants to do something?

A.Find out in an intelligent way what happens to the waste that leaves your home, and decide whether this is something you approve of. You might be surprised to learn that, especially around New York, much of it is incinerated in areas with poor, disadvantaged communities. Are you O.K. with the poor getting your toxic ash?

If you’re not, become a little motivated and write to your Congressman to ask if they think this is acceptable.

I also would like to encourage people to actually buy something. If you don’t have a reusable shopping bag, please get one and get a second for a friend or family member. There are kinds that fold up as small as a Ping Pong ball and you can keep it in your purse or briefcase and never have to take a pointless plastic bag home again.

And although you might get a few dirty looks, see what happens if you start taking the packaging off at the point of purchase. Retailers are very sensitive to their customers — you have the power to let them know what you do and don’t like, and they will listen.

Q.What was the most surprising thing you learned while making the documentary?

A.I didn’t realize that all this nondegradable rubbish and consumerism is in large part thanks to World War II and the massive war production apparatus that needed to be developed for peaceful purposes after the days of making weapons had ended. I was born in 1948, so it’s really only in my lifetime that this throwaway society has emerged.

I do remember a time before plastic bags when there was just a lot less of everything. I’m still a bit shocked when I walk down Main Street and see all this stuff in the windows. Who buys it all? How could you ever find the time to wear or use it all?

Maybe I’m just getting old, and I know that buying things doesn’t make you happy. But I feel like there’s a new social mood, maybe because of the economic crisis, more of us are reflecting on what we really need and what we can do without.

Q.The Christmas shopping season is in full swing. What would you like to say to people as they head out to the mall or load up their Amazon shopping cart?

A.Don’t buy people something they don’t need, let alone don’t want. Send them a kind message. I know we’re all supposed to keep on buying to get the economy going, but most of us don’t need very much — and in my opinion there is nothing like a lovely pair of warm socks or a good bar of soap.

http://green.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/14/q-and-a-jeremy-irons-and-trashed/?partner=rss&emc=rss

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,366 other followers