Max Irons – ‘The Host’ Trailer and Video Interviews

Max Irons: On the Set of ‘The Host’

See video of Max on the set of The HostHERE

Text from Dread Central:

MTV News visited the set of Andrew Niccol’s big-screen adaptation of Stephenie Meyer’s first adult novel, The Host, last month and brought back a behind-the-scenes peek at the film along with a few more details about what we can expect when it hits theatres on March 29, 2013.

The Host is the story of Melanie Stryder (Saoirse Ronan), one of the last humans to have avoided capture by an alien race called Souls. The Souls operate more like parasites in that they invade human bodies and erase their personalities. The film follows the unlikely partnership of Melanie and her parasite as they seek out the last of Melanie’s human relatives and her love, Jared (Max Irons). It also stars Jake Abel, William Hurt, and Diane Kruger.

For Ronan, whose character runs down corridors and jumps off tall precipices, her dual roles are a lot more physical than she expected, but she has relished the opportunity to flex those new action-type muscles. For his part, Irons is enjoying the struggle Jared has in wanting to be close to Melanie but knowing in the back of his mind that he can’t. Irons explained. “He wants to hold her, but the rational part of his mind is saying she needs to be killed.”

Author Meyer is involved in the production, and being on the cave sets was particularly magical for her. “It was so awesome. The cave set was enormous, it was vast, they’re just so cool, so much fun to walk on,” Meyer enthused. “It was kind of like someone built something out of your imagination just for you.”

Synopsis:
The Host is a riveting story about the survival of love and the human spirit in a time of war. Our world has been invaded by an unseen enemy. Humans become hosts for these invaders, their minds taken over while their bodies remain intact. Most of humanity has succumbed. When Melanie, one of the few remaining “wild” humans, is captured, she is certain it is her end. Wanderer, the invading “soul” who has been given Melanie’s body, was warned about the challenges of living inside a human: the overwhelming emotions, the glut of senses, the too-vivid memories. But there was one difficulty Wanderer didn’t expect: the former tenant of her body refusing to relinquish possession of her mind. When outside forces make Wanderer and Melanie unwilling allies, they set off on a dangerous and uncertain search for the man they both love.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Jeremy Irons Promotes ‘The Last Lions’

Jeremy Irons in the Lion’s Den from ABC News:

Jeremy is interviewed on New Mexico Style on KASA in Albuquerque, NM.

1st collector for Jeremy Irons on KOIN Studio 6
Follow my videos on vodpod

Jeremy is interviewed on Indy Style from WISH:

Jeremy is interviewed on DaybreakUSA:

Jeremy is interviewed on Hollywood Dailies on the Reelz Channel:

Jeremy is interviewed on Good Day LA on Friday 4 March 2011:

Photography: ‘Don’t make me sound teenaged,’ says Sam Irons – Times Online

Photographer Sam Irons is evidently a bit of a romantic, but then he pleads: “Don’t make me sound too teenaged.” The son of the actors Jeremy Irons and Sinéad Cusack is trying to explain his eerie, faintly threatening photographs, now showing at Jacobson Space in London alongside works by other emerging artists as well as such heavyweights as Andreas Gursky and Gerhard Richter.

A deserted French art fair, unpainted wooden booths free of art or the blank-walled back of a flashy New Mexico casino — empty of people, action or life of any kind, Irons’s images are stripped of narrative in an attempt to capture what he says is his experience of being in the world: “knowing but not knowing, belonging but not belonging, understanding but not understanding”, without the benefit of hindsight to really comprehend the significance of any given experience. Bumbling through life, essentially, as we all do.

Irons, 30, describes his overarching theme as “fairly teenagey existentialist angst”, which he feeds, to an extent, by heading off on road trips on his own, armed with his beloved Hasselblad camera, a tripod and a tent, to see what he can find. He admits that there is a certain romance to it (enhanced by his refusal to shoot with a digital camera, citing the superior tonality of film: “I’ve never seen a decent digital picture of a grey sky”).

“I went to Japan on my own and I had a really lonely, terrible time staying in a capsule hotel for an entire month — there’s an element of self-flagellation. I went out every day and shot, shot, shot and then I got home and found that my Hasselblad had a light leak the whole time. I got about a film and a half, which was a stab to the heart. But I still shoot on the same camera.”

The pictures have something of the stage set about them; perhaps not surprising when you consider his day job — a film location scout — and of course, his parentage. Didn’t he ever feel tempted to take to the boards in their wake? “I did a film when I was 9, but I just never got the bug,” he says. “I love actors, I love being around them, they’re great fun, if occasionally … exasperating, but I find it much easier on the other side of the lens. Growing up with two quite well-known parents you feel you’re being looked at a lot and I wanted to turn the tables.”

Nowhere … do we go from here? is at Jacobson Space, 6 Cork Street, London W1, until Jan 30

via Photography: ‘Don’t make me sound teenaged,’ says Sam Irons – Times Online.

Georgia O’Keeffe Reviews

Click the links to read reviews of Georgia O’Keeffe

New York Daily News

New York Times

Los Angeles Times

The Boston Globe

The Huffington Post

Fort Worth Star Telegram

Pittsburgh Post Gazette

San Francisco Examiner

Miami Herald

The Wall Street Journal

California Chronicle

The Bay Area Reporter

My San Antonio

Jeremy Irons defends Alfred Stieglitz, applauds Joan Allen

Jeremy Irons as Alfred Stieglitz in "Georgia O'Keeffe"

Jeremy Irons as Alfred Stieglitz in "Georgia O'Keeffe"

Share

Jeremy Irons Defends Alfred Stieglitz, Applauds Joan Allen

The Hollywood Exclusive: Jeremy Irons Defends Alfred Stieglitz, Applauds Joan Allen

by Marilyn Beck and Stacy Jenel Smith

Jeremy Irons, who plays the world-renowned photographer Alfred Stieglitz in Lifetime’s Sept. 19-debuting “Georgia O’Keeffe,” comes to the defense of the man with whom O’Keefe engaged in a turbulent 20-year relationship.

The Oscar, Emmy and Tony-award-winning actor declares, “Stieglitz was difficult, but forgivable. O’Keeffe loved him until the day he died. I do think creative people like she need a partner who excites them deeply, and that person does not have to be the easiest to live with. I wonder if she would have become a great artist without him. Sometimes we need a thorn to make us realize our greatness.”

Irons continues, “Granted, Stieglitz was difficult to live with. He had a record of picking talent for his art gallery and controlling them until it got so bad, they moved on. Georgia had to go to New Mexico to get away from him, but she never stopped loving him.”

Irons has nothing but kudos for his leading lady. “Joan Allen was born to play Georgia O’Keeffe,” he says. And, he adds, the story of O’Keeffe and Stieglitz was born to be made. He just can’t understand why it took so long to make it.

“It was shopped around for about seven or eight years as a motion picture and could never find a taker,” he reveals. And then, he notes, “It was offered to HBO and they turned it down. That was a shame. It was a big mistake. I must tell you, when I saw the completed film, I was thrilled.”

Share

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 3,769 other followers