Jeremy Irons at the 2013 Hay Festival

Jeremy Irons read Four Quartets by TS Eliot on Saturday 1 June.  He introduced a screening of Trashed and also was a part of the Poetry of the Great War readings on Sunday 2 June.

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Click HERE for audio of Jeremy Irons, Sinead Cusack and Rupert Evans reading The Poetry of the Great War. The actors read Josephine Hart’s programme featuring the work of Owen, Yeats, Sassoon and many others. Introduced by Francine Stock.
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Jeremy Irons on his love for TS Eliot – from The Telegraph

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Here are some photos and feedback from the weekend (Click on the thumbnails for larger images):

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Jeremy Irons to Participate in Hay Festival

hay festival logo

Jeremy Irons reads The Four Quartets

Event 477 • Saturday 1 June 2013, 8.30pm • Venue: Barclays Pavilion

The actor reads TS Eliot’s great masterpiece comprising Burnt Norton, East Coker, The Dry Salvages and Little Gidding.

Price: £7.00

BOOK TICKETS HERE
 
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Jeremy Irons, Sinead Cusack, Emilia Fox

The Josephine Hart Poetry Hour; The Poetry Of The Great War

Event 424 • Sunday 2 June 2013, 2.30pm • Venue: Barclays Pavilion

Actors read Josephine’s programme featuring the work of Owen, Yeats, Sassoon and many others. Introduced by Francine Stock.

Price: £9.00

Click here for tickets and more information.

Click here for tickets and more information.

Jeremy Irons Attends Josephine Hart Memorial Service

Jeremy Irons was among the guests at Westminster Abbey, on Monday 24 October 2011, for Lady Saatchi aka Josephine Hart’s memorial service. The Irish-born British writer, theatrical producer and television presenter who was married to Maurice Saatchi sadly passed away at the age of 69 from ovarian cancer on 2 June, 2011.
(October 25, 2011 – Photos by Bauer Griffin)

 

Audio from John Milton: Simply Sublime

Audio recorded from a 31 May 2011 performance of John Milton – Simply Sublime at Donmar Warehouse in London, as part of Poetry Week.

Jeremy Irons (Satan), Emilia Fox (Eve), Felicity Kendal (Narrator) and Dan Stevens (Adam) perform excerpts from Paradise Lost. The event was sponsored by Josephine Hart.

[No copyright infringement intended.]

As the audio quality is low, this is best listened to through headphones with the volume turned up high……Click on the play arrow below to listen. Click on the volume/speaker icon at the left of the audio player to increase the volume in the audio player module. The recording is approximately 1 hour in length.

A first-hand account from an attendee:

“The Donmar Warehouse is quite a small theater.The five actors were sitting on chairs in a row. They read excerpts from Milton’s Paradise Lost, Books 1 and 9. Jeremy read the part of Satan. The other parts were of Adam and Eve and a Narrator. The fifth woman talked about Milton at the beginning (a bit more than 17 minutes).

Jeremy wore his usual kind of clothes: white shirt, grey vest, reddish scarf, grey trousers and boots (not his riding boots, shorter ones), no glasses.

At the evening performance, the theater was nearly full. The evening performance was video-recorded for Josephine Hart, who was not there. The lady who recorded it said that Hart might share it on her homepage, but there is no guarantee.”

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A photo of Jeremy in Covent Garden on Tuesday 31 May 2011 – the day of his Poetry Week performance. [Photo Copyright  petra eujane ]

 

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Sadly, on Thursday 2 June 2011, Josephine Hart lost her battle with cancer and passed away at the age of 67.  Read more in the London Evening Standard.

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As part of the CD compilation “Words That Burn” by Josephine Hart, there is a recording of Jeremy Irons, Felicity Kendal, Emilia Fox and Greg Wise reading extracts of John Milton’s ‘Paradise Lost’, similar to what was performed at Donmar Warehouse.

Jeremy also read the part of Satan in ‘Paradise Lost’ for a BBC Radio 4 production of the Josephine Hart Poetry Programme on 20 April 2008.  In that performance, extracts from John Milton’s great Christian epic ‘Paradise Lost’ are read by Jeremy Irons (Satan), Felicity Kendal (narrator), Greg Wise (Adam) and Emilia Fox (Eve).

Jeremy Irons and Max Irons to Participate in Poetry Week at Donmar Warehouse

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Donmar Warehouse
41 Earlham Street
Seven Dials
London WC2H 9LX

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Jeremy Irons will be a reader on Tuesday 31 May and Max Irons will be a reader on Thursday 2 June.

Following the success of her readings for the T.S. Eliot Festival in 2009, Josephine Hart makes a welcome return to the Donmar to produce and direct a week of poetry featuring a series of special readings with some of the country’s leading actors. She will devote each performance to the works of one or two poets, introducing and setting their poems in the context of their life. “The idea is simple,” Hart says, “an understanding of the life and philosophy of the poet illuminates the poetry and therefore makes the experience of reading or listening to each poem more intense.”

Readers  for Poetry Week:

Monday 30 May: Philip Larkin – Too clever to Live? – Charles Dance & Dan Stevens.

Tuesday 31 May: John Milton – Simply Sublime (2.30pm and 7.30pm) Emilia Fox, Jeremy Irons, Felicity Kendal, Dan Stevens.

Wednesday 1 June: Sylvia Plath – The Woman is Perfected – Harriet Walter.

Thursday 2 June: WWI Poetry – The Poetry is in the Pity (2.30pm and 7.30pm) Kenneth Cranham, Rupert Evans, Max Irons, Ruth Wilson.

Friday 3 June: T.S.Eliot – I Gotta Use Words – Harriet Walter & Edward Fox.

Book your tickets by calling (in the UK) 0844 871 7624.

Jeremy Irons Remembers DAMAGE

Interview: Jeremy Irons Remembers The Film Damage



April 7th, 2011 6:40 PM by Alyssa Caverley
from Reel Movie News

The book Damage celebrated its 20th anniversary in March and now actor Jeremy Irons, who starred in the 1992 film adaptation of the popular novel is talking about his experiences.

Damage is story of a man’s desperate obsession and scandalous love affair. He is a man who appears to have everything: wealth, a beautiful wife and children, and a prestigious political career in Parliament. But his life lacks passion, and his aching emptiness drives him to an all-consuming, and ultimately catastrophic, relationship with his son’s fiancée.

Irons and author Josephine Hart talk about the special anniversary and what it was like seeing the film play out on the big screen.

Check it out!

Read more: http://www.reelmovienews.com/2011/04/interview-jeremy-irons-remembers-his-film-damages/#ixzz1IwhsK7pU

Jeremy Irons to read for Auden: Truth Out of Time

Jeremy Irons to participate in Auden – Truth Out of Time – at the National Theatre

The author Josephine Hart is joined by special guests to present her selection of the work of WH Auden; an opportunity to hear the succinct, elegant and unforgettable words of one of Britain’s greatest poets.

With Eileen Atkins, Jeremy Irons and Damian Lewis.

Tickets £3.50/£2.50
Running Time: 45mins

Monday 17 May 2010 – 6:00 pm – at the Cottesloe Theatre

Programme from Josephine Hart Poetry – Robert Browning event

(Thank you to Duncan Lockhart for the following information.)

Here is the list of what was read at the Josephine Hart Poetry Hour at the British Library:

Words That Burn – How to read poetry and why.
Poems of eight great poets by Josephine Hart

Charles Dance, Rupert Evans and Jeremy Irons read Robert Browning

Porphyria’s Lover
My Last Duchess
The Patriot
The Lost Reader
Memorabialia
Home Thoughts From Abroad
How They Brought The Good
New From Ghents To Aix

Then 50 sec of audio of Robert Browning

Pippa Passes
Respectability
You’ll Love Me Yet
Love Among The Ruins
A Light Woman***
A Toccata At Gallupi’s
Andrea Del Sarto

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Jeremy Irons read “A Light Woman” at Browning poetry event:

A Light Woman

I.

So far as our story approaches the end,
Which do you pity the most of us three?—
My friend, or the mistress of my friend
With her wanton eyes, or me?

II.

My friend was already too good to lose,
And seemed in the way of improvement yet,
When she crossed his path with her hunting-noose
And over him drew her net.

III.

When I saw him tangled in her toils,
A shame, said I, if she adds just him
To her nine-and-ninety other spoils,
The hundredth for a whim!

IV.

And before my friend be wholly hers,
How easy to prove to him, I said,
An eagle’s the game her pride prefers,
Though she snaps at a wren instead!

V.

So, I gave her eyes my own eyes to take,
My hand sought hers as in earnest need,
And round she turned for my noble sake,
And gave me herself indeed.

VI.

The eagle am I, with my fame in the world,
The wren is he, with his maiden face.
—You look away and your lip is curled?
Patience, a moment’s space!

VII.

For see, my friend goes shaling and white;
He eyes me as the basilisk:
I have turned, it appears, his day to night,
Eclipsing his sun’s disk.

VIII.

And I did it, he thinks, as a very thief:
“Though I love her—that, he comprehends—
“One should master one’s passions, (love, in chief)
“And be loyal to one’s friends!”

IX.

And she,—she lies in my hand as tame
As a pear late basking over a wall;
Just a touch to try and off it came;
‘Tis mine,—can I let it fall?

X.

With no mind to eat it, that’s the worst!
Were it thrown in the road, would the case assist?
‘Twas quenching a dozen blue-flies’ thirst
When I gave its stalk a twist.

XI.

And I,—what I seem to my friend, you see:
What I soon shall seem to his love, you guess:
What I seem to myself, do you ask of me?
No hero, I confess.

XII.

‘Tis an awkward thing to play with souls,
And matter enough to save one’s own:
Yet think of my friend, and the burning coals
He played with for bits of stone!

XIII.

One likes to show the truth for the truth;
That the woman was light is very true:
But suppose she says,—Never mind that youth!
What wrong have I done to you?

XIV.

Well, any how, here the story stays,
So far at least as I understand;
And, Robert Browning, you writer of plays,
Here’s a subject made to your hand!

Robert Browning


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Jeremy Irons at Hart Poetry Event

Hart’s Browning version

JOSEPHINE Hart last night hosted her famous Poetry Hour at the British Library celebrating Robert Browning.

Hart is pictured flanked by Rupert Evans (far left) and Jeremy Irons. Charles Dance read Browning’s poem about Italian artist Andrea Del Sarto.

Afterwards Sir Evelyn de Rothschild was introduced to Dance, and the financier was thrilled to relate how he owned an actual Del Sarto painting. Also present were Simon Gray’s widow Victoria, and Sandra Howard, whose novel A Matter of Loyalty is

coming out in paperback in the New Year. Will Michael take a step back into the shadows now that her writing is so successful? “He’s always said anyway that he’s going to stand down at the next election because he doesn’t believe in bed-blocking,” said Sandra modestly. From Tory leader to house husband.

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UPDATED – Jeremy Irons at TS Eliot poetry reading event

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TS Eliot widow exults in his poetry reading


more about “Jeremy Irons at Josephine Hart Poetry…“, posted with vodpod

 

hart poetry hour 6.30.09 1 hart poetry hour 6.30.09 2 hart poetry hour 6.30.09 3

01.07.09
by Geordie Greg

London Evening Standard

In a rare public appearance, TS Eliot‘s widow Valerie attended a reading of her husband’s poems last night at London University.

“It was marvellous to hear Tom’s poems and to have them read so well,” she said. It is 86 years since TS Eliot published The Waste Land, revolutionising English poetry and placing him as its greatest 20th century exponent.

The readers were Nobel Laureate Seamus Heaney, actor Jeremy Irons, The Wire’s star Dominic West and actress Anna Cartaret as part of the TS Eliot International Summer School. It is more than 44 years since Valerie Eliot was widowed and she has been the sole executor of his literary estate ever since, cleverly allowing Andrew Lloyd Webber to use her husband’s feline verse for the musical Cats which effectively bankrolled Faber & Faber as the music became a global hit.

The reading in the Brunei Gallery was organised by Josephine Hart, who has pioneered public poetry readings at the British Library and recorded CDs of verse read by Harold Pinter, Ralph Fiennes, Roger Moore, Edward Fox and many other great British actors, with a CD and book given to every secondary school, introducing pupils to the auditory power of poetry.

Mrs Eliot, 82, married the American-born poet in January 1957; he was 37 years older than her. She was the great love of his life, rejuvenating him after his disastrous first marriage to Vivien who was mentally ill.

Mrs Eliot edited the first volume of her husband’s letters and also the facsimile volume of The Waste Land with the manuscript showing how Ezra Pound cut it brilliantly by a third, ensuring its position as the most important poem in modern history.

She said she was moved and exhilarated by the readings which were fast, lively and produced a standing ovation from the audience.

“History before our eyes, an incredible connection,” said Heaney.

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