Jeremy Irons at the 2013 Open City Docs Festival

From Open City Docs Blog:

Open City Docs Fest 2013 finished on Sunday evening with an awards ceremony hosted by Jeremy Irons. After four days of events, including film screenings, workshops, panel discussions, master classes amongst others, festival goers congregated in the Cinema Tent to hear Irons give the verdict on the award nominees.

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As guests sipped on Aspall’s Cuvée Chevalier or Beefeater Gin cocktails, Irons explained that he and his fellow jurors had faced some tough decisions. Open City Docs Fest’s bold programming – covering a wide range of viewpoints and stories and exploring cinematic and political issues – had led to an extremely high standard of beautiful and thought-provoking films.
Jurors included:

Pulitzer Prize-winning author Anne Applebaum
BAFTA Award-winning director and producer Molly Dineen
Sundance Award-winning director Kim Longinotto
Emmy-winning director of digital documentary Highrise, Katerina Cizek
Producer of Into the Abyss, Andre Singer
Director Brian Hill (Secret History of Our Streets).

After detailing exactly what it was that separated the wheat from the chaff, and set an Open City Docs award-winning documentary apart from its rivals, Irons proclaimed Matthew’s Laws, directed by filmmaker Marc Schmidt the winner of the Grand Jury Award.

Award winners:

Grand Jury Award
Winner: Matthew’s Laws, directed by Marc Schmidt
Emerging International Filmmaker Award, sponsored by Aspall Cyder
Special mention: Wonder House, directed by Oonagh Kearney
Winner: Karaoke Girl, directed by Visra Vichit Vadakan
Emerging UK Filmmaker Award, sponsored by The British Council
Winner: Black Out, directed by Eva Weber
Best City Film Award, sponsored by Publica
Winner: The Venice Syndrome, directed Andreas Pichler
Best Short Documentary Award, awarded by the London Short Film Festival
Winner: The Whistle, directed by Grezgorz Zariczny
Special mention: FilmStripe, directed by John Blouin
MyStreet Awards, awarded by the Grand Jury
Winner: Richard, directed by Matt Hopkins
2nd prize: Niche in the Market, directed by Rod Main
3rd Prize: Blaenau, directed by Eira Wyn Jones

We at Open City Docs Fest would like to congratulate all the nominees and also give our thanks to our excellent juries.

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Photo via @thisisjukebox on Twitter

Photo via @thisisjukebox on Twitter

Jeremy Irons at The New School for Drama

Read original post HERE.

Jeremy Irons-97 with Karen Ludwig at the New School for Drama

 

When Academy Award winner Jeremy Irons auditioned for theater school in the 1960s, he wasn’t the shoo-in many would now suspect, given his subsequent accolades. “I just told the admissions panel, ‘Well, I think I might quite like the life of being an actor.’ That’s apparently not what they wanted to hear.” Of the four English schools he applied to, only the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School took the bite. Last Tuesday, New School for Drama students and faculty had a rare opportunity to hear such stories not often told, as Irons peppered anecdotes like this throughout his Q and A session with faculty member and actress Karen Ludwig.

In front of a tightly packed audience at the Drama Theatre, Irons and Ludwig’s hour-long conversation covered quite a range. From love scenes with Meryl Streep (an experience both share actors share: Irons’ A French Lieutenant’s Woman and Ludwig’s Manhattan) speculations on his true calling (“I always thought I’d end up an antique dealer”), and the makings of a good director (“He’s like a great chef; ingredients have to simmer”), the actor’s responses drew in many laughs and, more than once, applause. When asked why he initially pursued acting as a career, Irons said that he “loved the smell, the theatre house, and the idea that everyone involved was working their own life.”

With notable awards such as a “Best Actor” Oscar for Reversal of Fortune, two Golden Globes, and an Emmy, Irons’ work transcends both film and theater. He is commended for his virtuosity in portraying some of literature’s more difficult roles, such as Humbert Humbert from Lolita. Stay tuned via the connect portal for video of the Q and A session.

‘The Borgias’ Emmy Nominations

The Borgias has been nominated for six 2011 Primetime Emmy Awards and has already won two, at the Creative Arts Emmys. 

The 63rd Primetime Emmy Awards will be telecast live on Sunday 18 September 2011 at 8:00p.m. EST/ 5:00p.m. PST on FOX, in the United States.

 

  • Outstanding Art Direction For A Single-camera Series – 2011

The Borgias – Lucrezia’s Wedding Showtime

Showtime Presents in association with Take 5 Productions and Octagon Films

Francois Seguin, Production Designer; Jonathan McKinstry, Art Director; Judit Varga, Set Decorator

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  • Outstanding Cinematography For A Single-camera Series – 2011

The Borgias – The Poisoned Chalice/The Assassin Showtime

Showtime Presents in association with Take 5 Productions and Octagon Films

Paul Sarossy, Director of Photography

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  • Outstanding Costumes For A Series – 2011

* Winner 2011

The Borgias – Lucrezia’s Wedding Showtime

Showtime Presents in association with Take 5 Productions and Octagon Films

Gabriella Pescucci, Costume Designer; Uliva Pizzetti, Costume Supervisor

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  • Outstanding Directing For A Drama Series – 2011

The Borgias – The Poisoned Chalice/The Assassin Showtime

Showtime Presents in association with Take 5 Productions and Octagon Films

Neil Jordan, Directed by

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  • Outstanding Original Main Title Theme Music – 2011

*Winner 2011

The Borgias Showtime

Showtime Presents in association with Take 5 Productions and Octagon Films

Trevor Morris, Music by

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  • Outstanding Special Visual Effects For A Series – 2011

The Borgias – The Poisoned Chalice/The Assassin Showtime

Showtime Presents in association with Take 5 Productions and Octagon Films

Bob Munroe, Lead Visual Effects Supervisor; Doug Campbell, Visual Effects Supervisor; Bill Halliday, Visual Effects Producer; Juan Jesus Garcia, Visual Effects Art Director; Luke Groves, Visual Effects Technical Producer; Seth Martiniuk, Lead Visual Effects Compositor; Blair Tennessy, CGI Supervisor

SOURCE

 

Jeremy Irons Defends Alfred Stieglitz, Applauds Joan Allen

The Hollywood Exclusive: Jeremy Irons Defends Alfred Stieglitz, Applauds Joan Allen

by Marilyn Beck and Stacy Jenel Smith

Jeremy Irons, who plays the world-renowned photographer Alfred Stieglitz in Lifetime’s Sept. 19-debuting “Georgia O’Keeffe,” comes to the defense of the man with whom O’Keefe engaged in a turbulent 20-year relationship.

The Oscar, Emmy and Tony-award-winning actor declares, “Stieglitz was difficult, but forgivable. O’Keeffe loved him until the day he died. I do think creative people like she need a partner who excites them deeply, and that person does not have to be the easiest to live with. I wonder if she would have become a great artist without him. Sometimes we need a thorn to make us realize our greatness.”

Irons continues, “Granted, Stieglitz was difficult to live with. He had a record of picking talent for his art gallery and controlling them until it got so bad, they moved on. Georgia had to go to New Mexico to get away from him, but she never stopped loving him.”

Irons has nothing but kudos for his leading lady. “Joan Allen was born to play Georgia O’Keeffe,” he says. And, he adds, the story of O’Keeffe and Stieglitz was born to be made. He just can’t understand why it took so long to make it.

“It was shopped around for about seven or eight years as a motion picture and could never find a taker,” he reveals. And then, he notes, “It was offered to HBO and they turned it down. That was a shame. It was a big mistake. I must tell you, when I saw the completed film, I was thrilled.”

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