Jeremy Irons Interview for CNN-IBN

While in Dubai for the Chivas Legends Dinner, Jeremy Irons was interviewed by CNN-IBN’s Sushant Mehta –

Click the link or photo below to watch the video:

Jeremy Irons talks about his journey as actor and a philanthropist Sushant Mehta, CNN-IBN | Dec 15, 2013

cnn ibn

Jeremy Irons in Jakarta to Promote ‘Trashed’

Jeremy Irons was in Jakarta, Indonesia on 11 November 2013 to promote his documentary Trashed, as part of the Erasmus Huis Film Festival.

He then went on to Bali to visit a posyandu (integrated health services post) under the care of the Kartika Soekarno Foundation (KSF).

Read the full story from the Jakarta Post – Jeremy Irons: From Trash to Treasure

Hot topic: Jeremy Irons’ celebrity status could also draw attention to an issue even closer to his heart: the welfare of Indonesian children. Courtesy of Rio Helmi

Hot topic: Jeremy Irons’ celebrity status could also draw attention to an issue even closer to his heart: the welfare of Indonesian children. Courtesy of Rio Helmi

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Jeremy Irons at the World Actors Forum

Jeremy Irons was in Dublin, Ireland at the Gate Theatre on Saturday 15 June 2013, to participate in the World Actors Forum. Trashed was screened at the WAF and, afterward, Jeremy was interviewed by Joseph O’Connor.

On the same day, Jeremy Irons was present at University College Dublin, to see Sinead Cusack receive an Honorary Doctorate Degree.

WAF 4

The World Actors Forum 2013 from ALONG CAME A SPIDER on Vimeo.

Photo via @IrishFilmmakers on Twitter

Photo via @IrishFilmmakers on Twitter

Photo via Conor Furlong on Instagram

Photo via Conor Furlong on Instagram

Photo via @SticksStonesIRL on Twitter

Photo via @SticksStonesIRL on Twitter

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Jeremy Irons on BBC News ‘Hard Talk’

Jeremy Irons was a guest on the BBC News programme Hard Talk. The programme first aired on BBC News on April 15, 2013.  Check HERE for iPlayer availability.

Jeremy Irons – Actor and Campaigner

Duration: 30 minutes

Stephen Sackur meets one of Britain’s most successful actors, Jeremy Irons. The Oscar winning performer is best known for his portrayal of troubled, brooding upper class men. He has just finished making a documentary about the potentially devastating impact of the mountains of toxic waste polluting our planet. He is an actor with very strong opinions.

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‘Trashed’ Screenings at Documentary Edge Festival NZ

Trashed will be screened as part of the Documentary Edge Festival in New Zealand.

documentary edge festival logo

Times and locations are as follows:

Sunday 14 April  6:45 pm at the Q Theatre in Auckland, New Zealand  BOOK TICKETS

Friday 19 April 1:15 pm at the Q Theatre in Auckland,New Zealand  BOOK TICKETS

Sunday 12 May 6:30 pm at the Reading Cinemas Courtenay in Wellington, New Zealand

Friday 17 May 1:45 pm at the Reading Cinemas Courtenay in Wellington, New Zealand

 

 

Jeremy Irons to Attend ‘Trashed’ Screening at BAM

Source

Jeremy Irons will be in attendance on Sunday, April 21 at the BAM screening of Trashed and will participate in a Q & A session after the screening.

Sunday, Apr 21, 2013
  • 7PM
LOCATION:
Peter Jay Sharp Building
BAM Rose Cinemas
RUN TIME: 98min
GENERAL ADMISSION: $20
BAM CINEMA CLUB MEMBERS: $15
STUDENTS/SENIORS:  $16 (Students 29 and under with a valid ID, Mon—Thu)
+  Q&A with Jeremy Irons

The narrator of  Trashed, Academy Award-winning actor Jeremy Irons, will participate in a Q&A after the screening.

———————————————————————————————–

There will also be a School-Time Screening of Trashed on Earth Day for Schools Only
Grades 9—12   Jeremy WILL NOT be present on Monday.
Mon, Apr 22, 2013
  • 10:30AM
  • 11:15AM
LOCATION:
Peter Jay Sharp Building
BAM Rose Cinemas
RUN TIME: 2hrs 15mins (includes post-show Q&A)
+  All screenings are followed by discussion/Q&A. Post-screening guest to be announced.
If you are an educator you may make reservations HERE.

7 Questions with Jeremy Irons – ‘Trashed’

Read the original article HERE.

7 Questions With Jeremy Irons – Trashed

By on December 16th, 2012

 

In the Candida Brady directed documentary, Trashed, actor Jeremy Irons turns civilian as he ventures across the globe in search of solutions to the ecological crisis, while uniquely casting himself as a protagonist. And Irons also ponders during this exclusive interview when phoning from a set in Budapest, what the ultimate responsibility of an actor’s voice should be in the real world. Here’s Jeremy Irons, talking Trashed.

1. Do you recall when you first became alarmed about the harmful and destructive problem of waste on the planet, and decided to do something about it?

It didn’t happen quite like that. I wanted to make a documentary about an important subject. A subject which I thought should be brought to people’s attention. And Candida Brady, the director of Trashed, imparted some information to me. So I thought, this is an amazing subject. This is something we have to get on the screen, to make people aware of the situation. So it was really from her that I got the idea. You know, I always think of myself, I’m an actor and a storyteller. I normally tell fictional stories. But I see no reason why it isn’t a logical progression, to tell real stories. And I think the story of Trashed is worth telling.

2. And what led you to be part of this film as not only the narrator, but the very unusual position of protagonist in a documentary?

Well, I narrate many documentaries. But now to be there in a way, as an audience member, somebody who knows nothing about the situation. Although I did of course know a little bit about it. But I wanted to ask the questions that the audience would have asked, had they had a chance. And I felt it was very important to be meshed into it, in that way.

3. And how would you compare and contrast your very different roles as actor and activist?

Well, inquiry is needed in both. If I’m playing a character in a drama, I have to inquire about the world he lives in. And the sort of person he is, and what he’s done with his life. So I have to discover all of that. And the great advantage I have as an actor, is that I’m known. And therefore people will listen to me and watch me. And I feel in a way, that’s a responsibility.  I have a voice. I should use it. And not just with drama.

4. Jeremy, talk about the most horrific part of Trashed, the deformed children even decades later in post-war Vietnam.

As far as all those deformed fetuses in the bottles there, which was very upsetting, it was important to show that. And war I think, is something we have to fight against. You know, it’s hard to see the upside of any war. It may seem like a good idea at the beginning, but by the time you finish you think really, we shouldn’t have done that.

5. How does it feel to make that major switchup personally, from celebrity to just another civilian venturing out into the world among people, to talk about environmental issues. Rather than say, people venturing into theaters to see you?

I love it. I’ve always believed that to be an artist, an interesting artist, you have to be involved in life. You have to care about life. It’s an enormous privilege, doing the work I do. It brings me into people’s lives, sometimes into people’s hearts. And not to use that intimacy that I have with my audience, to tell them something that I believe is important, would seem a terrible thing. And an abuse of my position.

6. And how do you feel your activism concerning the environment has changed you?

When I see how people are amazed by this film, it gives me some of the joy maybe a teacher gets, when he sees people being really affected. And of course it’s the people in the audience who will get things changed. These big changes that we have to make to the way we behave and the way we live, they take time. And they build on themselves. And I see our film as being part of that process.

7. What about the challenge of opposing the huge corporations, and their stranglehold on the government?

 I think it’s an enormous shame, that governments have seem to lost the voice of the people. And who don’t want to be controlled by vast, amoral corporations. We cannot live in that way. And I think our governments have to fight corporations on our behalf. For instance, plastic makes money for a lot of people. But nobody has discovered a way to get rid of it. Our governments should be our guardians. We elect them to look after us. And not just to make people rich.

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