‘The Borgias’ Season 3 Promos

The Borgias, Season 3 Premiere – Full Episode


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The Borgias season 3 promo – “Father, Son, Unholy Spirit”


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The Borgias season 3 short promo – “Give in to Sin”

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The Borgias season 3 promo – “Nothing is Sacred. Everything is a Game.”

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The Borgias : Season 3: Episode 1 Clip – We are at War


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The Borgias : Season 3: Episode 1 Clip – There is a Plot


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On the Season 3 Premiere of The Borgias:


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Watch ‘The Borgias’ Season 2 Premiere Full Episode

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Also watch on Xfinity TV

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‘The Borgias’ – Season 2 Promo Pics and Stills

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The Borgias returns to Showtime on Sunday 8 April 2012 for Season 2 with its first episode entitled “The Borgia Bull”.

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Jeremy Irons is back as bad guy on ‘The Borgias’
BY LUAINE LEE
McClatchy Newspapers

British performer Jeremy Irons didn’t enter acting to become an actor. He joined to become a gypsy, he says.

“I had this sort of romantic vision of the life I wanted. I always say to kids now, ‘Find out what makes you happy and try to make a life that gives that to you, whatever that may be doing.’ I wanted a job which allowed me to move from society to society, not to be stuck in a conventional rat race,” he says in the courtyard of a hotel here on a chilly winter’s day.

He considered three options: life in the circus, the carnival or the theater. “I went and looked at circuses and carnivals, and I looked the accommodations they gave to the staff, and I thought, ‘I think I’m too middle-class for that. I don’t think I could live in something that small. I think maybe I’ll look at the theater.’ So I went and joined a theater in Canterbury when I was 18.”

The actor, who has illuminated the screen in films like “Reversal of Fortune,” “The Iron Mask” and “Die Hard: with a Vengeance,” returns Sunday as the evil Rodrigo in Showtime’s “The Borgias.”

It doesn’t matter whether Irons is playing the consummate hero in “The Man in the Iron Mask” or the Machiavellian pope in “The Borgias.”

“I’ve always been interested in gray,” says Irons, who is dressed in ochre pants, a khaki jacket trimmed in leather, and a black scarf circling his neck.

“I think we all have shades of gray in us. Nothing is really black and white. Yes, I play some people who carry their ‘bad sides’ to extremes, but I think that’s what the storyteller should do. What happens if you hit the edge of acceptable behavior or go over it? Why is that edge there? ‘Lolita’ is a perfect example — a man who broke social mores and acted in a way that was unacceptable. But why is it unacceptable? You see what happens to both him and the girl by the end of the picture, and you realize that that is why we say the behavior is wrong, because it destroys people.”

When he first started out he was hammering flats and holding candelabra on stage as part of the “scenery.” For a time he was even a busker. “That means I would sit on the street corners and play music for money,” he says.

“Performing was something I felt comfortable with, and I loved the communication, between an audience and the storytellers, in the same way I loved the communication when I was singing a song well … and I enjoyed the process.”

He enjoyed the process so much that he became an arch perfectionist — a curse to those around him, he says, as he rolls a brown cigarette in a machine he takes from his pocket.

“I realized that I was caring so much about my work and trying to make it absolutely perfect that — you will have to forgive my language here — there is a very thin line between a perfectionist and a complete (expletive). And I think I was falling over that line,” he says.

“Perfection, you can’t seek it because it doesn’t exist. I was worrying about it so much and making it fairly difficult for people who were working with me to work with me. And I sort of realized that the most important thing is to have fun with what you are doing. … Learn your lines, learn your character and then have fun with it. So I sort of pulled back and thought there is no way that an actor can make something perfect, you have no control over the finished project. Try and make it fun for everyone.”

Dissatisfied with his achievements, he actually quit for a while. “I turned 50. I found I was doing film work which I was bored by, and I wanted something that would absorb me completely. And I think it had something to do with the fact that in my 30s and 40s I was playing leading roles and then in my late 40s and 50s I was playing guest characters, and smaller roles. You don’t feel the same when you show up for a month instead of being there the whole time,” he says, rescuing a tea bag from his cup.

“I found a ruin (castle) in Ireland, and I spent two years just working on that. I had a large crew, but I was running it. And then I began to run out of money because I was paying 40 wages a week, and so I started acting again here and there over the next three years so six years over all. It was the greatest project I have done. I came back a slightly different person and started off again.”

He still owns the 15th century Kilcoe Castle and he and his wife of 34 years, actress Sinead Cusack, stay there when work permits. They have two grown sons. Sam is a photographer and Max, alas, is an actor. “My boys are 33 and 25, and you still ache for them if things go wrong,” he sighs.

© 2011 Belleville News-Democrat and news service sources. All Rights Reserved. http://www.bnd.com

‘The Borgias’ Season 2 Promo Video and Screencaps

View the original video HERE for full screen.

“The Borgias” Season 2 Promo, posted with vodpod

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The Borgias Behind the Scenes Season 1

From Balint Regius’s Gallery  - Photos taken in 2010 from behind the scenes of The Borgias season one.  The photos were taken on locations in Soponya, Komárom, Budapest and Etyek in Hungary.

Unfortunately, it seems, he did not get any photos of Jeremy.  David Oakes, Francois Arnaud and Colm Feore do appear in some of these photos, however.

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‘The Borgias’ Press Kit

All photos and text property of Showtime. No copyright infringement intended.

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Plum Role: History’s Ultimate Godfather – NY Times

Read the full original article at: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/27/arts/television/the-borgias-a-showtime-mini-series-starring-jeremy-irons.html

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March 25, 2011

Plum Role: History’s Ultimate Godfather

By CHARLES McGRATH

ALTHOUGH they lived in the 15th and 16th centuries, the Borgias, the subject of a new nine-part Showtime mini-series that begins next Sunday, were a family made for TV. The Borgias were rich, ruthless, scheming and corrupt, and so sexually voracious that, if you believe the rumors, they slept with everyone, including one another. Mario Puzo, who worked on a novel about them, called the Borgias the Corleones of the Renaissance. They also resemble “The Sopranos” a little. Imagine if Tony, instead of running a garbage hauling business, had bought himself the papacy.

“The Borgias,” which cost $45 million to make, was created, written and produced by the film director Neil Jordan, who also directed several episodes. It is Showtime’s latest entry in what is becoming a high-stakes game on cable TV now that it’s no longer enough merely to show Hollywood movies or the odd sporting event. If you want to sell cable subscriptions these days, you need not just original programming but a long-running, franchise-defining series like “The Tudors,” Showtime’s recent hit.

A bankable star doesn’t hurt either, and in the new series the Borgia paterfamilias, Rodrigo, who became Pope Alexander VI, is played by Jeremy Irons, not exactly typecast. To judge from his famous portrait by Cristofano dell’Altissimo, the historical Rodrigo, corpulent and hatchet nosed, looked as if he had been inflated with a tire pump. At the time of his death, or so the legend goes, he was so bloated and debauched that when his body was inserted into the coffin, someone had to jump on the lid to get it shut.

“When we first talked about the part, Jeremy was worried that he didn’t have that bulbous weight,” Mr. Jordan said recently, speaking by phone from his house in Ireland. “I told him that if we can get this guy properly situated, torn between God and politics, the weight wouldn’t matter.” He added: “I wanted someone who would understand the kind of history here. ‘The Borgias’ isn’t just a saga of poisoning and nubile women, like a Ken Russell movie. Well, we do have all that, but we also put this figure in historical context.”

Mr. Irons, still elegantly handsome at 62, doesn’t look much like Pope Alexander. He nevertheless has, both on screen and in person, a slightly detached, regal quality, a darting, glinting intelligence, and occasionally an air of weary melancholy, all very useful papal attributes. He also has a long history of playing characters who are morally ambiguous if not outright villainous: Humbert Humbert in “Lolita”; the deranged twin gynecologists in David Cronenberg’s “Dead Ringers”; the accused wife poisoner Claus von Bülow in “Reversal of Fortune” (for which he won an Academy Award); even Scar in “The Lion King.” And with that deep, rumbling voice, like an organ echoing in a cathedral, he sounds the way a Renaissance pope should sound: the sibilant S’s, the luxurious drawn-out vowels suggesting knowledge acquired outside the seminary.

Mr. Irons speaks this way in real life too, and in New York recently, draped over a chair in his suite at the Lowell hotel, he employed that same voice to say, “We don’t talk about my voice.” He doesn’t like to be made conscious of it, he explained, recalling a conversation he had years ago with the actor John Hurt. “You know all these young actors coming up, 18, 19, 20 — rather good, aren’t they?” Mr. Hurt said. “You know what I do? I go up and say, ‘You’re a great actor, with such a fantastic voice. Have you ever listened to it?’ ”

And then they’re finished, Mr. Hurt said gleefully.

Mr. Irons was a late bloomer. He grew up well to do, on the Isle of Wight in England and went to Sherborne, a midlevel boys’ boarding school, where he was a good athlete but such an indifferent student that the headmaster predicted he would wind up as a paratrooper. He tried being a social worker before becoming an actor and then had such trouble finding parts that for a while he supported himself as a home remodeler. His breakthrough didn’t come along until 1981, when he was cast as the earnest, proper Charles Ryder in the 11-part television adaptation of Evelyn Waugh’s “Brideshead Revisited.”

“We had just come through the ‘Look Back in Anger’ phase, and actors like Tom Courtenay and Albert Finney were sort of fashionable — what I call the kitchen-sink actors, actors with local accents,” he said. “It was ‘Brideshead’ that made it acceptable to have someone who was tall and English and spoke properly as a hero.”

Nevertheless he mostly sees his archetypal Englishness as a liability rather than a strength. “The American version of the Englishman is rather like the English version of the American — sort of one-dimensional and not very attractive,” he said. “I’ve tried not to capitalize on my Englishness. If I had the charm of David Niven or Hugh Grant, then maybe I would, but I don’t. I’m dirtier and more odd.”

The roles of characters who are strange or morally enigmatic have come to him, he went on, partly by accident, or because he has a reputation for playing them, and partly because he has sought them out. “Certainly they attract me,” he said. “I’m always interested in good and evil, who’s a good person, who’s a bad person, believing, really, that we’re all rather gray.”

No one is grayer than Rodrigo Borgia, who bought the papacy in a rigged election, had numerous mistresses and fathered four children yet was also a skilled diplomat and renowned patron of the arts. Mr. Jordan said he thought the whole family has suffered from bad press: “A lot of the history was written by Rodrigo’s successors, especially by Cardinal Giuliano della Rovere, who became Pope Julius II. There was no Gibbon or Niall Ferguson to write about the Borgias, and so they become a little demonized.”

He added that what he found interesting in writing the script was that once Rodrigo was put in the context of his family, he remained attractive no matter how evil he became. Oddly, the villain of “The Borgias” is Rodrigo’s rival, della Rovere (played by Colm Feore), a model of probity and holiness.

Mr. Irons said that in researching the part he made a list of all the qualities attributed to Rodrigo Borgia. “It was like a rainbow,” he said. “The list goes all the way from ‘generous man,’ ‘wonderful company,’ ‘a great organizer’ to ‘poisoner,’ ‘cruel’ and ‘despotic,’ all the worst adjectives you can think of. I thought: ‘That’s very interesting. Maybe it’s all true. Maybe from different vantage points all those adjectives could be seen to be the truth.’ Film is always a kind of patchwork anyway, and my hope is that Rodrigo will emerge as a man of many different colors and many different behaviors. He’s completely different when he’s being persuaded by his daughter or bullied by the mother of his children or negotiating with the Spanish ambassador. I never judge. That’s not my job. I just try to link all those attributes.”

Mr. Jordan said: “Jeremy does manage to humanize the monster, doesn’t he? I loved him as Claus von Bülow. You had absolutely no idea what that character was thinking.”

About playing the pope, a character who is always being deferred to while being lugged around on a throne or gliding through his palace in robes, Mr. Irons said, “It’s daft, really, but someone’s got to do it.” Then he became serious and went on, “I hope the Vatican doesn’t go down the obvious path of creating a great controversy over this, though I’m sure Showtime would love that.”

He added: “I think the great strength of Neil’s script is that because he’s a very bright man and a historian who reads very widely, he’s found something possibly nearer the truth about the Borgias, though God knows what the truth really is. I’m hoping that the audience will be totally confused about whether to root for this man. It’s a bit like von Bülow, you know. Did he do it or not?”

The enduring charm of the Borgias

The enduring charm of the Borgias

http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/tv/reviews/the-enduring-charm-of-the-borgias-2247598.html

One of history’s most notorious families is returning to TV – this time with a class cast. Sarah Hughes has a preview…

Monday 21, March 2011

When in Rome: Jeremy Irons stars in the costume drama 'The Borgias' When in Rome: Jeremy Irons stars in the costume drama ‘The Borgias’.

As The Tudors rollicks towards its final episodes, complete with extra wheezing from Jonathan Rhys Myers as the declining Henry VIII, fans of ludicrous yet oddly addictive historical dramas are feeling a slow-burning sense of loss. How will we spend our Saturday nights now that Rhys Meyers, his incredible cheekbones and his distinctly odd way of Declaiming. Each. Sentence. As. Though. He. Was. Learning. To. Read. For. The. First. Time. are no longer with us?

Luckily there is hope on the horizon, for Showtime, the channel that originally commissioned The Tudors, is clearly aware that some of us can never have too much frippery, flouncing and fornication on our television shows, provided that is that they come accompanied with suitably ripe dialogue and the weight of history on their side.

So it is that the US cable channel has headed to 15th-century Rome for its latest drama, a new take on one of history’s most notorious families, the ambitious, murderous Borgias. On paper this is a brilliant idea with the potential for much mayhem, blood, guts, poisoning and heaving of breasts – and Showtime’s extended trailer for the new show, which begins in the US on 3 April before coming to Sky Atlantic in July, certainly plays up to the family’s reputation with rousing music, close-ups of a sorrowful yet sinister Jeremy Irons, the suggestion of dark deeds afoot, and the snappy tagline: “The Original Crime Family”.

So far, so satisfying. However, any new version of the Borgias raises an old spectre: will it be as bad as the infamous 1981 BBC adaptation, which was reckoned to have killed costume drama at the BBC for the best part of a decade?

That 10-part series was infamous for the graphic (for its time) nudity and violence and for a particularly memorable scene where half-naked actors crawled across the floor picking up chestnuts with their mouths. By the time the Vatican issued an edict condemning the BBC’s The Borgias the only question asked by anyone with any taste was what on earth took them so long?

Thankfully, the new Borgias looks like it will actually be rather good. Jeremy Irons, who plays the power-crazed Cardinal Rodrigo Borgia later to become one of history’s most infamous Popes, has a whale of time. His Rodrigo, all hissing sibilants and subtle suggestions, wields his power quietly yet absolutely, more Godfather Part II-era Michael Corleone than Tony Soprano.

While Irons dominates, the rest of the cast, which includes Derek Jacobi and Colm Feore as Rodrigo’s rivals, Joanne Whalley as his principal mistress, Vanozza dei Cattanei, and a couple of brooding bruisers (François Arnaud and David Oakes) as his murderous sons Cesare and Juan Borgia, are no slouches and manage to sell some fairly baroque moments involving the campaign for the new Pope, which could easily teeter into Monty Python-esque parody.

That they don’t is also thanks to the involvement of the idiosyncratic Irish director Neil Jordan, who is the series’ co-creator and will direct the first two episodes. The Borgias is something of a pet project for Jordan who has been trying to make a film about the family, described as “The Godfather set in the Vatican” since 2000.

That said The Borgias is also the work of Michael Hirst, the man behind The Tudors and the scriptwriter for Elizabeth and Elizabeth: the Golden Age. Hirst, a man who never met a period of history he couldn’t joyfully sex up, is the sort of wilfully over-the-top writer whom you either love or despise.

Should historical drama be accurate? The only sane answer is yes but Hirst has so much fun proving the opposite that it’s hard not to get swept along. His involvement suggests that this Borgias might be more Rome than I, Claudius, more Tudors than Elizabeth R but it’s also the case that even if the series does turn out to be tosh, it will be lavishly shot, lovely to look at and completely addictive tosh.

TCA Press Event Photos and News

The Borgias will premiere on Showtime on Sunday, April 3, 2011, from 9:00 to 11:00 pm EST.  It will move to its regular time slot of 10:00 pm, the following week.

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From Elise Crane Derby via Twitter

Click on any of the thumbnails for a larger image:

Jeremy is not in this video, but Colm Feore, who plays Cardinal Della Rovere in “The Borgias”, speaks about working with Jeremy and he gives a lot of interesting details about the filming of the series.

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From Brittany’s TCA 2011 Blog:

The Borgias

Please stop calling Showtime’s The Borgias a sequel to its wildly successful The Tudors. According to Borgias star Jeremy Irons, the shows are alike “as much as Hamlet is the same as MacBeth.”

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Billed by Showtime as “the original crime family,” the series depicts the titular family as Rodrigo Borgia (Irons) “builds an empire through the corruption of the Catholic Church and orchestrates a relentless reign of power and flamboyant cruelty” once he begins Pope Alexander the Sixth. The same qualities are seen in his children as Juan (David Oakes) becomes head of the papal armies and Cesare (Francois Arnaud) is made a Cardinal, while Rodrigo plots to marry off daughter Lucrezia (Holliday Grainger) as a means of further improving the family’s political position. Sex, violence, and chaos abounds.

“The series is about power and God and how they interact,” creator, writer, director (of the first two episodes) and executive producer Neil Jordan said. Co-star Colm Feore added that it’s a “very difficult problem. Maybe they don’t work together.”

Yet with all the sin, debauchery and cruelty perpetuated by the Borgias, are they going to repel some viewers who find them too objectionable? It’s possible, but no one seemed particularly bothered. Asked that question, Irons replied, “It’s for us to judge them, and wonder how much has changed [since then].” He added that the fact that people are afraid of skeletons in closets may have something to do with ‘why we have such boring people as leaders” – because they don’t want their misdeeds inevitably exposed by their candidacy.

On top of that, The Borgias faces another hurdle. With religion involved, controversy sometimes follows. Jordan doesn’t expect a backlash, however, saying that “these events are so well-documented and [Rodrigo] did try and protect the institution [of the Catholic Church]. I don’t think the Church will be unhappy.” Yet there’s only so far history can take the fictional Borgias. Asked how much research the actors did, Fiore said that it doesn’t matter as much as we might think, since “you’re only going to be doing the bit selected for the story.” Arnaud concurred: “It’s not about history so much anymore as it is about what we’re telling you.” In other words (mine, not theirs), die-hard history buffs should expect some dramatic license.

If there’s one thing in common between The Borgias and The Tudors, it’s that once again there’s no shortage of salacious content, with plenty of nudity and implied sex acts in the clip reel alone. However, unlike how it became a marketing point for The Tudors, it “just happened to be part of the story” of The Borgias, Jordan said. Yet that’s where the similarities end.

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Memorable quotes from The Borgias TCA panel discussion:

1. I read something about Pope John the Pope John Paul, is it, the Polish Pope. And it was from a Catholic theologian who said he wrote, actually, ‘Habet duos testiculos et bene pendentes.’ He said, ‘This man is well hung. That’s why he deserved to be Pope.’ Now, certain things the Vatican will not reveal to all of us, but there is a chair, apparently, a Porphyry Chair, with a large circular hole in it to so these examinations can be made. Now, many people will deny that, but I’ve read I read reputable historians who says it happens, okay? Perhaps no longer, but then it did.” – Neil Jordan, “The Borgias” (Showtime)

2. “I think (Rodrigo Borgia) is a pretty good guy just doing the best he can. I mean, power corrupts, you know. It was a time quite unlike the time we live in today. There were murders in Rome every night, poisonings most weekends. There was incest here and sodomy there. You know, it was a good old rolling, rollicking society. And if you’ve got to try and run that, which the Pope attempts to do, then, of course, you’ve got to play by some of the games, by some of the rules that society follows. I didn’t judge him at all. I just tried to hang on by the…hang onto the position and do what he wanted too. I think it’s up to the audience to say what is good, what is wrong, what is right, and then think how much… wonder how much has changed as you look at present day Italy or present day almost anywhere of power. I think there are huge parallels about what people get up to in order to hang on to power and in order to get their way. I don’t think anything has changed, and perhaps those thoughts will go through our minds when we judge these people. I played him. I thought I was quite a good guy. But George W. Bush probably thought he was quite a good guy, too. Stalin probably liked himself.” – Jeremy Irons, “The Borgias” (Showtime)

3. “As a director, (’The Borgias’) is a nightmare because (the actors) all come with the books about their character. ‘Hang on, I didn’t do that. Look, it says here he did this. It says here he did that.’ Stop, please.” – Neil Jordan, “The Borgias” (Showtime)
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From Ray Richmond, who is contributing to Deadline Hollywood’s TCA coverage:

There’s no mystery where Showtime is taking its marketing orders from in promoting its forthcoming historical costume drama series The Borgias that premieres April 3. The tagline hypes it as “the original crime family,” documenting life in the Italian Renaissance of the late 1400s and the corrupt rule of Rodrigo Borgia, who would become Pope in 1492. As he described during a TCA session this afternoon, the man playing the Borgia patriarch, Jeremy Irons, saw the notorious Rodrigo as “a pretty good guy doing the best he can.”

Irons continued, “It was an interesting time. There were murders every night. Poisonings most weekends. Incest here, sodomy there. It was a good old rolling, rollicking society. If you’re going to run that as a Pope tends to do, you’re going to have to play by some set of rules. I don’t judge him at all. I think it’s up to the audience to say what is good, what is wrong, what’s right. There are huge parallels today to how things were back then as far as what people get up to and what they do to get their way. I don’t think anything has changed really. I played him as someone who thought he was a pretty good guy. I’m sure George W. Bush thought he was a good guy, too. Stalin probably liked himself.”

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The Borgias – First Official Photos

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