Jeremy Irons at the 2014 BAFTA Awards

Jeremy Irons was in attendance at the 2014 BAFTA Awards to present, along with Prince William, the BAFTA Fellowship Award to Dame Helen Mirren.

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Jeremy Irons at the 2014 Screen Actors Guild Awards

Jeremy Irons, nominated for Best Actor in a TV Miniseries or Movie, for his performance as King Henry IV in The Hollow Crown, was in attendance at the 2014 Screen Actors Guild Awards.

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Jeremy Irons Receives 2014 SAG Award Nomination for ‘The Hollow Crown’

Jeremy Irons has been nominated for a 2014 Screen Actors Guild Award for his role as King Henry IV in The Hollow Crown.

In a statement Jeremy Irons said:
“It was a real pleasure to play Henry IV on film surrounded by such a strong cast; and for Richard Eyre’s production to touch so many, reinforces Shakespeare’s relevance to today’s audience. For my performance to be included among those nominated by my peers in the Actors Guild is a great honour.”

The 20th Screen Actors Guild Awards presentation will be held on January 18, 2014 at the Shrine Auditorium & Exposition Center in Los Angeles. The awards will air live, in the USA, on TNT and TBS at 8:00pm EST.

Hollow Crown Review

Jeremy is nominated in the category of Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries.

Here are the nominees in his category:

Outstanding Performance by a Male Actor in a Television Movie or Miniseries

Matt Damon as Scott Thorson – “Behind the Candelabra”

Michael Douglas as Liberace – “Behind the Candelabra”

Jeremy Irons as King Henry IV – “The Hollow Crown”

Rob Lowe as John F. Kennedy – “Killing Kennedy”

Al Pacino as Phil Spector – “Phil Spector”

Jeremy Irons on BBC News ‘Hard Talk’

Jeremy Irons was a guest on the BBC News programme Hard Talk. The programme first aired on BBC News on April 15, 2013.  Check HERE for iPlayer availability.

Jeremy Irons – Actor and Campaigner

Duration: 30 minutes

Stephen Sackur meets one of Britain’s most successful actors, Jeremy Irons. The Oscar winning performer is best known for his portrayal of troubled, brooding upper class men. He has just finished making a documentary about the potentially devastating impact of the mountains of toxic waste polluting our planet. He is an actor with very strong opinions.

hard talk 1 hard talk 2 hard talk 3 hard talk 4 hard talk 5 hard talk 6 hard talk 7 hard talk 8 hard talk 9 hard talk 10 hard talk 11 hard talk 12 hard talk 13

Max Irons in ‘The White Queen’

Max Irons is set to star in The White Queen, a 10-part BBC adaptation of Philippa Gregory’s 2009 novel of the same name, from her bestselling novel series The Cousins’ War, which centers on the life of Elizabeth Woodville the wife of Edward IV. The drama was filmed in Bruges, Belgium in the fall and winter of 2012.

Max will portray King Edward IV. Rebecca Ferguson, James Frain, Janet McTeer, David Oakes, Juliet Aubrey, Eleanor Tomlinson, Frances Tomelty, Michael Maloney, Ben Lamb, Hugh Mitchell, Simon Ginty, Eve Ponsonby and Robert Pugh will also appear in the drama. The mini-series has also been picked up by the Starz! network in the U.S. for broadcast in 2013.

Read more from the BBC Media Centre.

the white queen poster

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Henry IV, Part 1 – Video

Follow the links below to watch The Hollow Crown: Henry IV, Part 1

Part 1 – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rgZYAUQ9Wno

Part 2 – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YSmPplAquJE&feature=relmfu

Part 3 – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nKm6QCifJ08&feature=relmfu

Part 4 – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g8k1Fg_Oquk&feature=relmfu

Part 5 – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yMRZkQlz8wY&feature=relmfu

Part 6 – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXaaG0GMh1E&feature=relmfu

Part 7 – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKqFmcEHAiQ&feature=relmfu

Part 8 – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nIQqtFnDnOw&feature=relmfu

Part 9 – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MRWk1NqEjPY&feature=relmfu

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Shakespeare Uncovered Episode 5 – Jeremy Irons on the Henrys

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From the BBC TV Blog – Henry IV & Henry V: Q&A with the Costume Designer

Jeremy Irons goes Henry IV into battle

Liverpool Echo 30 June 2012

After almost a decade, Jeremy Irons is returning to Shakespeare, as King Henry IV in a new BBC series. Acting’s good, he tells Kate Whiting, but what he really loves doing is tinkering with his boat.

IN A snow-covered field just a stone’s throw from the M25, Jeremy Irons, Tom Hiddleston and a heavily disguised Simon Russell Beale are doing battle.

It’s a surreal sight, as Jeremy and Tom, in chain mail and red capes, charge back and forth on horses through a throng of armour-clad men, while Russell Beale, in a fat-suit and clasping a spear, runs comically away from just about everyone in his path.

On hills either side of the small valley are camps of ancient tents and, were it not for the camera crew in modern-day dress, you could almost imagine it was Medieval England. Even the sounds of the M25 have been muffled, much to director Richard Eyre’s relief, thanks to the snow.

But this is January, 2012, and the scene being filmed is the climax of Shakespeare’s Henry IV Part I, where the future Henry V, young Prince Hal, will defeat rebel leader Hotspur, ultimately taking his place in history.

Some time earlier, in the comfort of a heated modern tent, which doubles as wardrobe and canteen for the battling mob, Jeremy Irons, who’s playing the titular king, settles down to discuss his first Shakespeare play since the 2004 Merchant Of Venice film.

He looks every inch the lauded British thespian, dressed in a red woolly jumper, Middle Eastern scarf, cords and high black boots, with a backwards cap on his head – chic but cosy.

“Shakespeare is wonderful to come back to, you forget how fertile his language is,” says the 63-year-old, in those deep, familiar tones.

“You get used to working in film, where language is spare and often not well written and suddenly you get back to this language, his use of rhythm, the choice of words, the way he changes from one thought to another on a sixpence, which is glorious.

“It’s like driving an Aston Martin and you think, ‘Oh yes, this can do anything, once I get to know how to do it’. Once you’ve done some of those big roles, even though you might not have done it for a few years, you know the possibilities, you know what you’re looking for – which is to make it sound completely colloquial and understandable to an audience.”

Indeed, with their season of four Shakespeare history plays, entitled The Hollow Crown, it’s the BBC’s mission to appeal to as wide an audience as possible. As part of the Cultural Olympiad in the run-up to London 2012, the Shakespeare Unlocked season charts the rise and fall of three kings; self-indulgent Richard II (played by Ben Whishaw) who is overthrown by his cousin Bolingbroke, Henry IV, and finally his son Henry V.

The two parts of Henry IV tell of the king’s guilt over deposing his cousin and struggle to retain the crown, as his enemies rise up against him.

In recent years, Jeremy, who made his name in the 1981 ITV series Brideshead Revisited before starring in films such as Lolita, The Mission, The Lion King and the Oscar-winning Reversal Of Fortune, has returned to TV acting, with an acclaimed role in the US drama The Borgias. Next month, he’s off to Budapest to film the third series.

Television has become more appealing as film budgets dwindle, he says.

“Movies are really having a problem. The sort of pictures I make, what I call the £8m to £30m, are not made very easily now. The £200m are getting made and the £1m movies are getting made, but the ones in the middle are finding it very hard.

“I’ve been watching the series that are coming out of America and there’s such good writing happening. Mad Men, The Wire, Damages, this is really good drama, good writing.”

When he does get a break from his acting schedule, Jeremy has more than enough at home in Ireland to keep him busy.

“I love downtime because there are many other things I love doing,” he says simply. “I’ve always been a doer-upper of things. In the early days it was furniture, then it became houses. Now I have a boat and horses, which is very lucky.

“At one stage, during my 30s, I remember leaving the house thinking, ‘Why do I have to work, there’s so much I want to get done?’. Then I thought, ‘Careful, you have to work in order to support the life you want to live’.”

And with that, Jeremy is off to ride a horse – for work.

The Hollow Crown begins on BBC Two today. Jeremy Irons appears in Henry IV Parts 1 & 2 on Saturday, July 7 and Saturday, July 14

Read More http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/liverpool-entertainment/showbiz-news/2012/06/30/jeremy-irons-goes-henry-iv-into-battle-100252-31289207/#ixzz1zH4aizR8

The Hollow Crown – As good as TV Shakespeare can get?

From the Guardian.co.uk

The Hollow Crown: as good as TV Shakespeare can get?

The BBC’s new Shakespeare films, starting this weekend with Richard II, show that the Bard can play as well on TV as in the theatre

During TV conferences and festivals, at least one delegate always argues that Shakespeare, if he were around today, would be writing EastEnders or Holby City. This claim is based on the fact that theatre, at the time Shakespeare’s plays were written, was a mass audience form rather than the relatively elitist entertainment it has become; and also, more subtly, on the contention that the playwright’s fondness for parallel plots and cross-cutting to some extent anticipates screen narrative.

And yet, despite these affinities, Will has always tested the will of TV producers. The BBC TV Shakespeare – a late 1970s attempt to film all 37 plays as an educational tool – became a headline calamity, helping to establish Clive James’s reputation as a critic through his pitiless Observer reviews of shaking scenery and stagey acting. The original production of Much Ado About Nothing (starring Penelope Keith and Michael York) was never transmitted because, according to the minutes of BBC management meetings I have seen, it was considered such a failure.

The original producer, the late Cedric Messina, left the project and Jonathan Miller came in as an emergency replacement. Miller steadied the shipwreck – with productions including John Cleese as a brilliant Petruchio in The Taming of the Shrew – and it’s good to have a permanent record of, for example, Derek Jacobi’s Hamlet. But, in general, the experience cemented the view that Shakespeare is a weapon to be deployed on television only when particular performances called to be immortalised – Laurence Olivier’s King Lear and Ian McKellen’s and Judi Dench’s Macbeths on ITV, Patrick Stewart’s Macbeth by the BBC – or when there is a special occasion, such as BBC licence fee renegotiation or, this summer, as part of the Cultural Olympiad alongside the London Games.

Bringing together four of the Shakesperean English history plays under a group of high-class stage directors, The Hollow Crown begins this weekend on BBC2 and marks a significant advance in the medium’s fight with this writer.

The troubled BBC Complete Shakespeare taught several lessons – that not all of the works merit the attention of the audience; that studio recordings create an uneasy limbo between theatre and TV; that the pace and fluidity of made-for-TV dramas can make stage plays seem slow and staid; and that it is vital to have an overall producer who understands both Shakespeare and film.

The Hollow Crown brings a full set of ticks to this checklist. Present from the start, rather than parachuted in as Jonathan Miller was, Sam Mendes has executive produced the series, while also presiding over another English cultural icon: the new James Bond movies.

And this BBC TV Shakespeare is sensibly restricted to a discrete and particular 9% or so of the collected works. The linked sequence of Richard II (directed by Rupert Goold), Henry IV Parts 1 and 2 (filmed by Sir Richard Eyre) and Henry V (under Thea Sharrock’s direction) tell a sequential story, with recurring characters and so have a structural similarity with the four-part family drama, a staple of TV fiction. In this sense, The Hollow Crown can be seen as a relative of The Tudors, though with significantly better dialogue.

Mendes and his directors have also assimilated the wisdom of TV property shows: what matters in filming Shakspeare is location, location, location. Instead of a studio mediaeval England formed from hardboard, we get actual castles, taverns and forests.

The two productions that I have so far seen – Richard II and the first part of Henry IV – also convincingly show that, rather than being a triumph over limitations, filmed Shakespeare has some advantages over theatrical versions. In the often-bewildering opening scene of Richard II, which begins with a list of characters and their achievements, Goold’s camera can simply close in on the noble being mentioned, easily establishing characters in a way that, in the theatre, would require much fumbling with a programme in the dark.

And, in Henry IV, Eyre employs every trick of cinematic fluidity to match the quick flow of modern screen drama: cross-cutting and dissolving between the three main locations (the court, the rebels, Falstaff’s dens) and turning soliloquies into their natural screen equivalent of voice-overs.

Another benefit of television is the available cast: because it isn’t asking for a three-month run or global tour to make the budget back, The Hollow Crown simultaneously retains a group of actors that even the most famous theatres could only accumulate over several seasons. Theatre-goers have long anticipated Simon Russell Beale’s eventual Falstaff but he gives it here first: cloud-bearded and earthy, a portrait of ambition and intelligence chiselled away by appetite. And, if SRB does play Falstaff in the theatre, it is highly unlikely, for budgetary and logistical reasons, to be in a company that also includes Julie Walters, Lindsay Duncan, David Suchet and David Morrissey.

There remains a basic flaw in the theory that because Shakepeare was a populist writer in his time, he should naturally suit TV now: the mainstream television audience, often made suspicious of classic theatre by education and school theatre outings, would take much persuasion to tune in to these dramas. But, despite that caveat, The Hollow Crown feels as good as TV Shakespeare is going to get.

Radio Times – Kings of Cool

Thank you to scarletthammer on Tumblr for the scans.

Radio Times 30 June -6 July 2012

Kings of Cool – Classic Shakespeare with Britain’s biggest stars

Click on the images for full size:

Telegraph Review – At home with the histories

From artyprettykipple on Tumblr

Click on the image for full size and to read the text:

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