Jeremy Irons Reads TS Eliot’s ‘The Waste Land’ BBC Radio 4

Complete audio of The Waste Land, read by Jeremy Irons and Eileen Atkins…

Click on the audio player below:

Source

Friday 30 March 2012

2:15 – 3:00 p.m. (GMT) on BBC Radio 4

Radio Times review by: Laurence Joyce

Thank heavens for Ezra Pound! Without his artistic intervention TS Eliot’s modernist poetic masterpiece would have been called He Do the Police in Different Voices instead of The Waste Land. This we learn in the introductory contributions from the Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, Jackie Kay, Matthew Hollis and Sean O’Brien that set Eliot’s complex and multi-layered work in its literary and historical context.

But it is the reading of the text itself by Jeremy Irons and Eileen Atkins that is most enlightening for anyone who has ever struggled to catch Eliot’s drift. Their measured delivery, never overdone, captures the poem’s bleak emotional landscape, breathing life into its panoramic sweep and mundane detail, with Atkins chillingly perfect in Death by Water.

 

About this programme

Eileen Atkins and Jeremy Irons read the poem by TS Eliot, featuring an introduction by the Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams, Jackie Kay, Matthew Hollis and Sean O’Brien. The author’s seminal work is arguably one of the most influential of the 20th century, and is split into five parts – The Burial of the Dead, A Game of Chess, The Fire Sermon, Death by Water and What the Thunder Said.

Cast and crew

Cast

Reader
Eileen Atkins
Reader
Jeremy Irons
Contributor
Rowan Williams
Contributor
Jackie Kay
Contributor
Matthew Hollis
Contributor
Sean O’Brien

Crew

Producer
Susan Roberts
Writer
TS Eliot

 

 

Watch ‘The Borgias’ Season 2 Premiere Full Episode

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Also watch on Xfinity TV

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‘The Borgias’ – Season 2 Promo Pics and Stills

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The Borgias returns to Showtime on Sunday 8 April 2012 for Season 2 with its first episode entitled “The Borgia Bull”.

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Jeremy Irons is back as bad guy on ‘The Borgias’
BY LUAINE LEE
McClatchy Newspapers

British performer Jeremy Irons didn’t enter acting to become an actor. He joined to become a gypsy, he says.

“I had this sort of romantic vision of the life I wanted. I always say to kids now, ‘Find out what makes you happy and try to make a life that gives that to you, whatever that may be doing.’ I wanted a job which allowed me to move from society to society, not to be stuck in a conventional rat race,” he says in the courtyard of a hotel here on a chilly winter’s day.

He considered three options: life in the circus, the carnival or the theater. “I went and looked at circuses and carnivals, and I looked the accommodations they gave to the staff, and I thought, ‘I think I’m too middle-class for that. I don’t think I could live in something that small. I think maybe I’ll look at the theater.’ So I went and joined a theater in Canterbury when I was 18.”

The actor, who has illuminated the screen in films like “Reversal of Fortune,” “The Iron Mask” and “Die Hard: with a Vengeance,” returns Sunday as the evil Rodrigo in Showtime’s “The Borgias.”

It doesn’t matter whether Irons is playing the consummate hero in “The Man in the Iron Mask” or the Machiavellian pope in “The Borgias.”

“I’ve always been interested in gray,” says Irons, who is dressed in ochre pants, a khaki jacket trimmed in leather, and a black scarf circling his neck.

“I think we all have shades of gray in us. Nothing is really black and white. Yes, I play some people who carry their ‘bad sides’ to extremes, but I think that’s what the storyteller should do. What happens if you hit the edge of acceptable behavior or go over it? Why is that edge there? ‘Lolita’ is a perfect example — a man who broke social mores and acted in a way that was unacceptable. But why is it unacceptable? You see what happens to both him and the girl by the end of the picture, and you realize that that is why we say the behavior is wrong, because it destroys people.”

When he first started out he was hammering flats and holding candelabra on stage as part of the “scenery.” For a time he was even a busker. “That means I would sit on the street corners and play music for money,” he says.

“Performing was something I felt comfortable with, and I loved the communication, between an audience and the storytellers, in the same way I loved the communication when I was singing a song well … and I enjoyed the process.”

He enjoyed the process so much that he became an arch perfectionist — a curse to those around him, he says, as he rolls a brown cigarette in a machine he takes from his pocket.

“I realized that I was caring so much about my work and trying to make it absolutely perfect that — you will have to forgive my language here — there is a very thin line between a perfectionist and a complete (expletive). And I think I was falling over that line,” he says.

“Perfection, you can’t seek it because it doesn’t exist. I was worrying about it so much and making it fairly difficult for people who were working with me to work with me. And I sort of realized that the most important thing is to have fun with what you are doing. … Learn your lines, learn your character and then have fun with it. So I sort of pulled back and thought there is no way that an actor can make something perfect, you have no control over the finished project. Try and make it fun for everyone.”

Dissatisfied with his achievements, he actually quit for a while. “I turned 50. I found I was doing film work which I was bored by, and I wanted something that would absorb me completely. And I think it had something to do with the fact that in my 30s and 40s I was playing leading roles and then in my late 40s and 50s I was playing guest characters, and smaller roles. You don’t feel the same when you show up for a month instead of being there the whole time,” he says, rescuing a tea bag from his cup.

“I found a ruin (castle) in Ireland, and I spent two years just working on that. I had a large crew, but I was running it. And then I began to run out of money because I was paying 40 wages a week, and so I started acting again here and there over the next three years so six years over all. It was the greatest project I have done. I came back a slightly different person and started off again.”

He still owns the 15th century Kilcoe Castle and he and his wife of 34 years, actress Sinead Cusack, stay there when work permits. They have two grown sons. Sam is a photographer and Max, alas, is an actor. “My boys are 33 and 25, and you still ache for them if things go wrong,” he sighs.

© 2011 Belleville News-Democrat and news service sources. All Rights Reserved. http://www.bnd.com

Max Irons in ‘The Host’ – First Images and More

People magazine has released some great images of Soairse Ronan and Max Irons from The Host!

Open Road Films has set a March 29, 2013 release date (Easter weekend) for The Host.

Plot synopsis from IMDB.com

Earth has been inhabited by an intellegent alien species known as “Souls.” Although an incredibly peaceful race, Souls can only survive by being inserted into a host body, taking control of their minds. In an effort to discover the secret whereabouts of some of the last remaining human resistances, the Soul Wanderer has been inserted into the human being Melanie Stryder (Saoirse Ronan) , who was captured while attempting to locate her family. After insertion, Wanderer comes to realize an unsettling fact- Melanie has not faded away in consciousness, and in fact is putting up walls in her mind to prevent her family from being found. As time passes and Wanderer tries to break Melanie’s walls, she begins to feel sympathetic toward the humans Melanie loves so dearly- her brother Jamie and her partner, Jared Howe (Max Irons). Wanderer becomes torn between loyalty to her own race, trying to give information to the argumentative Seeker assigned to her, and her blossoming love for the humans in her memories. As Wanderer’s and Melanies trust builds, they embark on a journey through the desert to find the resistance, nearly dying in the process. Wanderer awakens to find herself captive in the den of the enemy, and realizes her problems have just begun: the humans want her dead, the doctor wants to experiment on her, she may have accidentally lead the Seekers here, and she has become hopelessly in love with Jared, the man who belongs to the human she occupies. What follows is an inspiring story of friendship, love, and loyalty in which the bonds of human brotherhood are tested, and an alien discovers that in all the planets in the universe she has experienced, humans are the only race she would give her life to save. .

Max Irons by Johan Sandberg for L’Officiel Hommes Italia

Source

‘Night Train to Lisbon’ – Stills and Press Release

Official website for the film

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Press release:

Jeremy Irons in Portugal

Some photos via Rui Rebelo on flickr

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Video of Jeremy at the press conference in Lisbon, Portugal from RTP.pt

More video of Jeremy at the press conference from Lux.pt

Video from the 15 April 2012 Press Conference from tvi24

Cinebox video interview with Jeremy Irons from http://www.tvi.iol.pt

Night train to Lisbon // Making of // Bille August, Jeremy Irons from Cineuropa on Vimeo.

 

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from Cinema.sapo.pt

The first major international film production with the name of the Portuguese capital in the title will debut early next year and will be distributed worldwide, was announced today by producer Ana Costa.

The filming of “Night Train to Lisbon ‘, directed by Danish Bille August , runs from Monday and lasted for the next eight weeks in the local Portuguese capital, in Caxias (Oeiras) and Palmela.

The total investment will be eight million, four million of which will be spent in Lisbon, a co-production between Portugal, Germany and Switzerland, in the capital took place over four days, the only footage of the work outside of Portugal.

The film, which is an adaptation of a novel by Swiss writer Pascal Mercier, will involve a team of 75 people, mostly Portuguese, to tell the story of a Latin teacher in Bern that in the years 1960, reaches Lisbon to find out more about Amadeu de Prado, medical writer and aristocratic Portuguese opposition to the dictatorial regime that was the rage in the country.

The main role is in charge of British actor Jeremy Irons , who returns to work in Portugal, as noted in today’s meeting with journalists, 19 years after having been in the country to run “The House of Spirits’ , also directed by August and based on the novel’s namesake Chilean author Isabel Allende.

Irons said that it is a “history of discovery, mystery and adventure.”

Actors Nicholas Breyner and Beatriz Batarda are some of the Portuguese who are also part of the cast, which also includes the representation of Melanie Laurent (France), Jack Huston and Tom Courtenay (UK), August Diehl (Germany) and Bruno Ganz ( Switzerland), among others.

Ana Costa, CineMate the producer, said: “Night Train to Lisbon” will be the movie that will have the largest financial support from the European fund Eurimages, whose value is not specified.

He also stressed the investment in the current context of crisis, the film will bring to Lisbon, where inject four million euros during the period of filming.

The city of Lisbon is among the sponsors of the work, such as the Institute of Cinema and Audiovisual (ICA). Since the Fund for Cinema and Audiovisual (FICA) gave no financial contribution, despite having signed a contract to that effect, fails to Ana Costa attributed to the fact that this institution be “frozen” since 2008.

This investment would make even more sense for the movie has already secured the display abroad, in charge of the German distributor K5. In Portugal this role will be assumed by ZON Audiovisuals.

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from c7nema

The British actor arrived today (18) to the Portuguese capital for the start of filming of his new album, “Night Train to Lisbon” (“Night Train to Lisbon ‘). Accompanied by director Bille August and the film makers, the press Irons presented the project, which will be filmed almost entirely in Lisbon in the next seven weeks. It is the second time the two worked together in Portugal: in 1993 they filmed in Alentejo “The House of the Spirits.” The shooting started last week with four days of filming in Bern, Switzerland.

Based on the novel by Pascal Mercier Swiss, “Night Train to Lisbon” chronicles the life of a quiet Latin teacher, Raimund Gregorius, who lives in Bern. Encased in a routine life, Gregorius takes the unexpected decision to enter a train to Lisbon without an apparent reason – after going to the station to deliver the jacket lost a young man who saved him from suicide.

He then found in his coat pockets a book by a Portuguese writer, Amadeo de Prado. Intrigued by the book and its author, decides to conduct a survey in Lisbon on the life of Amadeo de Prado, a physician active in the resistance anti-Salazar. At the same time, it will rebuild your own life from another perspective.

According to Irons, what is interesting in the character is just the fact that he has total control over your life and in an instant, after an unexpected act, adopt a measure that completely strip the usual way – until I realized that after this process became a different man.

The actor also had high praise for Portugal. Recalling his stay in another country, said the magic that is a different atmosphere here. “What I remember is I loved Portugal,” he said. Irons revealed that has not had much time to learn about the period of the dictatorship of Salazar, at which time it becomes part of history. He quipped that just came out of a project based on Henry IV, Shakespeare, and he had to learn a lot about him.

Bille August has already revealed that he was attracted by the prospect of extraordinary events when they occur in the lives of ordinary people – questioning how much change is or is not within reach of each one. The director did not fail to emphasize the fact that the story was passed in Lisbon was an important factor in its decision to immediately accept the proposal of the German producer Studio Hamburg, without even reading the first version of the argument. August also said he was thrilled to return – and that the major effort will be trying to capture on film the magic and mystery of the capital Lisbon.

As in “The House of the Spirits”, August surrounds himself with a large international cast. In addition to Irons, Melanie Laurent, Lena Olin, Charlotte Rampling, Bruno Ganz, Jack Huston, Martina Gedek, August Diehl and Christopher Lee completes the main cast. On the Portuguese side, especially Nicholas and Beatrice Breyner Batarda.

The film and the difficulties of Portuguese cinema

“Night Train to Lisbon ‘will cost £ 7.7 million. In addition to producing German, Swiss and C-Films CineMate by the Portuguese side, co-produce the film. It will be launched in 2013, distributed by Zon Lusomundo in Portugal and abroad by German K5.

The co-producer of the Portuguese side, Ana Costa, stressed the importance of a project size international prestige for the dissemination of Lisbon in the world. “It’s the first time a work of this size takes its name from Lisbon in the title,” he said. About 90% of the film will be shot in Lisbon, with a few more scenes in Caxias and Palmela – beyond those already filmed in Bern. Costa estimates that around £ 3.5 million will be spent in the capital with the filming of the movie. This information reinforces the idea defended by a representative of Studio Hamburg, Russ Günther, that any funding of cinema in Portugal, particularly the state should see it, not as entertainment but as an economic activity generating resources for the country – and co-productions are good solutions for the continuation and funding of Portuguese cinema in times of crisis.

The other studio representative, Kerstin Ramcke, gave information about the project, which already takes six years. First came the difficulties of transposition of the book to film, since it is largely focused on philosophy. Then were the obstacles inherent in a large production, with the search for co-producers and sponsors. The filmmaker Bille August has given its OK for two years and Irons confirmed their participation after one year.

Mercier’s book, already translated into Portuguese, was a major bestseller in German in recent years.
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JEREMY IRONS PRAISES PORTUGUESE CUISINE, LANDSCAPES AND MUSIC

(TRAVPR.COM) USA – April 13th, 2012 – Actor Jeremy Irons, who is in Lisbon filming the movie “Night Train to Lisbon,” yesterday praised the quality of Portuguese cuisine, the “magic” of the Fado music and the beauty of the nation’s landscapes.

During a dinner aboard the Portuguese Navy’s historic tall ship Creoula, in the presence of Secretary of State for Tourism, Cecilia Meireles, Irons referred to Lisbon as a “unique place” in Europe, combining hills, small cobbled streets, preserved heritage and a unique luminosity.

During filming in Portugal, the cast has had the opportunity to enjoy a night of Fado music which left Jeremy Irons surprised with this truly Portuguese musical genre, and with the voices of a new generation of artist: “It was three quarters of an hour absolutely magical and unbelievable”.

Moreover, Irons pointed out his passion for Portuguese cuisine: “The fish you eat here (in Portugal) is just fantastic! I would live here just because of the fish”. He was surprised to hear that many internationally renowned restaurants, including ones in New York, only serve fish caught in Portugal.

Accompanied by the other stars from the movie (Bruno Ganz and Charlotte Rampling) Irons also referred to the beauty of the beaches on the Alentejo coast, one of the locations where the movie takes place. In addition, he is interested in the unique relationship between Portugal and the sea with more than 400 miles of coastline and where some of the most beautiful beaches in Europe are found.

Pascal Mercier’s novel “Night Train to Lisbon” is the basis of the film by Danish director Bille August, being shot take in Lisbon until May 2012.

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