Jeremy Irons in a Harold Pinter Celebration from BBC Four

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Jeremy contributes to CD by Jon Lord

Click here to go to the Jon Lord official website for more about “To Notice Such Things”.

‘Afterwards’ is the album’s final track. It features Jeremy Irons reading Thomas Hardy’s poem of the same title with Jon Lord on piano.

The album is dedicated to the memory of his late friend Sir John Mortimer and contains a six piece suite for solo flute, piano and string orchestra as well as three other compositions for the same forces.

1. To Notice Such Things

a. As I Walked Out One Evening
b. At Court
c. Turville Heath
d. The Stick Dance
e. The Winter of a Doormouse
f. Afterwards

2. Evening Song
3. For Example
4. Air on the Blue String
5. Afterwards (poem read by Jeremy Irons)

Go to JonLord.org to listen to samples from To Notice Such Things.

SAG Awards Coverage

Jeremy Irons did not win a SAG award tonight, but spoke during the opening moments of the telecast.

Golden Globes coverage

Contour by Getty Images Photo Gallery

The Getty Images website has recently added a number of Contour by Getty Images portraits of Jeremy.

Click on the thumbnails for larger images:

Jeremy Irons to star in “The Borgias” for Showtime

Jeremy Irons to star in “The Borgias” TV show
Sat Jan 9, 2010 5:08pm EST

LOS ANGELES, Jan 9 (Reuters Life!) – Scheming Italian renaissance family “The Borgias” will be the subject of a U.S. television series next year, with Oscar-winning British actor Jeremy Irons playing the starring role.

Robert Greenblatt, entertainment chief of Showtime, told TV reporters on Saturday the cable channel had ordered 10 episodes of “The Borgias” to be directed by Neil Jordan, who won a screenwriting Oscar for his 1992 film, “The Crying Game.”

“The Borgias” will air in spring 2011 and replace Showtime’s hit steamy English period drama “The Tudors,” whose fourth and final season starts in April.

The Borgia family, one of whose members became Pope Alexander VI in 1492, was notorious for murder, rape and corruption in 15th century Italy and has inspired a number of books, plays and films.

Irons, 61, won an Oscar for his role as socialite Claus von Bulow in the 1990 movie “Reversal of Fortune.” (Reporting by Jill Serjeant; Editing by Peter Cooney)

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THE WORLD’S MOST NOTORIOUS DYNASTY – THE BORGIAS – COMES TO SHOWTIME

Network Greenlights Epic Drama Series Starring Oscar(R) Winner Jeremy Irons and Executive Produced by Academy Award(R) Winning Director Neil Jordan and Veteran Film and Television Writer/Producer Michael Hirst

LOS ANGELES, CA, January 09, 2010 – Showtime Networks has ordered 10 episodes of a one-hour drama series based on the infamous Italian Renaissance family The Borgias, it was announced today by Robert Greenblatt, President of Entertainment, Showtime Networks Inc. Oscar(R)-winning actor Jeremy Irons will star in the epic drama series as Rodrigo Borgia, the cunning, manipulative patriarch of The Borgia family who ascends to the highest circles of power within Renaissance-era Italy. Additionally, Academy Award(R) winning director Neil Jordan (The Crying Game) will create and executive produce the series as well as direct the first two episodes. Veteran film and television writer/producer Michael Hirst, who created, wrote and executive produced SHOWTIME’s original series The Tudors, will serve as executive producer/writer.

“Having blazed a trail with the award-winning THE TUDORS, we wanted to continue to offer our audience a period drama as wicked, witty, and utterly compelling — and that’s what THE BORGIAS will be,” said Greenblatt. “I can guarantee you’ve never seen a family quite like this before, nor could you make up the outrageous twists and turns of their epic saga if your life depended on it. The directorial mastery of Neil Jordan along with Michael Hirst’s flair for bringing historical dramas vividly to life for a contemporary audience will make THE BORGIAS unlike anything else on television.”

THE BORGIAS will be a complex, unvarnished portrait of one of history’s most intriguing and infamous dynastic families. The series begins as the family’s patriarch Rodrigo (Jeremy Irons), becomes Pope, propelling him, his two Machiavellian sons Cesare and Juan, and his scandalously beautiful daughter, Lucrezia, to become the most powerful and influential family of the Italian Renaissance. And all that power and influence eventually leads to their demise. As Machiavelli once said about his friends, the Borgias, “Politics have no relation to morals.”

Jeremy Irons is one of the most celebrated film, television and stage stars of the last thirty years. He has won the Academy Award (R) (Reversal of Fortune), a Tony Award(R) (The Real Thing), two Emmy Awards(R) (Elizabeth I, The Great War and the Shaping of the 20th Century), two Golden Globe(R) Awards (Elizabeth I, Reversal of Fortune) and a Screen Actors Guild Award(R) (Elizabeth I). His list of memorable films and television include; Brideshead Revisited, The Mission, Dead Ringers, Being Julia, The Merchant of Venice, Lolita, and Appaloosa. Last season he appeared on Broadway in Impression opposite Joan Allen. He is currently nominated for a Golden Globe and SAG Awards for his performance in Georgia O’Keefee.

The series will be produced as a Canadian-European Treaty co-production in a manner similar to the production of THE TUDORS. It will go into production this spring for a debut in early 2011.

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Photos of Jeremy and family at Sam’s exhibition premiere

Jeremy, Sinead, Max and Sam were all at Jacobson Space in London on 7 January 2010 for the Private Viewing of the new exhbition “Nowhere…do we go from here?”.

Click on the thumbnails for larger images:

Screen Caps of Max Irons in ‘Dorian Gray’

Max’s character’s name in the movie ‘Dorian Gray’ is Lucius. He’s on screen for only a few minutes and speaks one line.

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Photography: ‘Don’t make me sound teenaged,’ says Sam Irons – Times Online

Photographer Sam Irons is evidently a bit of a romantic, but then he pleads: “Don’t make me sound too teenaged.” The son of the actors Jeremy Irons and Sinéad Cusack is trying to explain his eerie, faintly threatening photographs, now showing at Jacobson Space in London alongside works by other emerging artists as well as such heavyweights as Andreas Gursky and Gerhard Richter.

A deserted French art fair, unpainted wooden booths free of art or the blank-walled back of a flashy New Mexico casino — empty of people, action or life of any kind, Irons’s images are stripped of narrative in an attempt to capture what he says is his experience of being in the world: “knowing but not knowing, belonging but not belonging, understanding but not understanding”, without the benefit of hindsight to really comprehend the significance of any given experience. Bumbling through life, essentially, as we all do.

Irons, 30, describes his overarching theme as “fairly teenagey existentialist angst”, which he feeds, to an extent, by heading off on road trips on his own, armed with his beloved Hasselblad camera, a tripod and a tent, to see what he can find. He admits that there is a certain romance to it (enhanced by his refusal to shoot with a digital camera, citing the superior tonality of film: “I’ve never seen a decent digital picture of a grey sky”).

“I went to Japan on my own and I had a really lonely, terrible time staying in a capsule hotel for an entire month — there’s an element of self-flagellation. I went out every day and shot, shot, shot and then I got home and found that my Hasselblad had a light leak the whole time. I got about a film and a half, which was a stab to the heart. But I still shoot on the same camera.”

The pictures have something of the stage set about them; perhaps not surprising when you consider his day job — a film location scout — and of course, his parentage. Didn’t he ever feel tempted to take to the boards in their wake? “I did a film when I was 9, but I just never got the bug,” he says. “I love actors, I love being around them, they’re great fun, if occasionally … exasperating, but I find it much easier on the other side of the lens. Growing up with two quite well-known parents you feel you’re being looked at a lot and I wanted to turn the tables.”

Nowhere … do we go from here? is at Jacobson Space, 6 Cork Street, London W1, until Jan 30

via Photography: ‘Don’t make me sound teenaged,’ says Sam Irons – Times Online.

Sam Irons exhibition at Jacobson Space

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